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Prepping - sleepers awake

Posted on 02/23/2013 5:53:35 AM PST by JoeProBono

prepping present participle of prep (Verb) Verb

Prepare (something); make ready. Prepare oneself for an event.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: preppers; prepping
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King Oscar: In Olive Oil Two Layer Sardines, 3.75 oz

Buy from Walmart


1 posted on 02/23/2013 5:53:38 AM PST by JoeProBono
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To: JoeProBono

Be prepared.

They are...


2 posted on 02/23/2013 5:55:34 AM PST by Old Sarge (We are officially over the precipice, we just havent struck the ground yet...)
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To: Old Sarge


3 posted on 02/23/2013 6:01:36 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: JoeProBono

For stocking up I’ve been contemplating Corned Beef Hash and Beef stew. (I’ve got some but I want to get more) Are these considered good items for stockpiling canned goods?


4 posted on 02/23/2013 6:05:10 AM PST by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: Mad Dawgg

Just keep in mind that ALL canned foods have an inordinately amount of salt.


5 posted on 02/23/2013 6:10:31 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: Mad Dawgg

Read the label


6 posted on 02/23/2013 6:10:50 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: knarf

inordinate ... not inordinately.


7 posted on 02/23/2013 6:13:41 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: Mad Dawgg

Those are good, so are canned ready to eat soups.


8 posted on 02/23/2013 6:14:09 AM PST by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: JoeProBono

Now THAT does not surprise me...


9 posted on 02/23/2013 6:14:24 AM PST by Old Sarge (We are officially over the precipice, we just havent struck the ground yet...)
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To: knarf

Preserving food with salt is an ancient human practice that dates back before written records. Beef jerky, pickles, and smoked salmon are all examples of common foods that are preserved using salt. But are salty foods really safer to eat?
Salt as a Preservative

Salt preserves food in the following ways:

Salt dries food. Salt draws water out of food and dehydrates it. All living things require water and cannot grow in the absence of water. Salt is used to preserve beef jerky by keeping it dry, and it prevents butter from spoiling by drawing water out, leaving just the fat.
Salt kills microbes. High salt is toxic to most microbes because of the effect of osmolarity, or water pressure. In very high salt solutions, many microbes will rupture due to the difference in pressure between the outside and inside of the organism. High salt can also be toxic to internal processes of microbes, affecting DNA and enzymes. Solutions high in sugar also have the same effects on microbes, which is why it is used as a preservative of foods such as jams and jellies.

Misconceptions about Salt Preservation

Many people believe that saltier foods are more resistant to microbial growth. As a result, they are more willing to consume questionable foods if they have higher salt contents.

Here are the facts. Most bacteria, with the exception of halophiles (salt-loving bacteria), cannot grow in conditions where salt is greater than 10%. Molds can withstand even higher salt levels. To get 10% salt, you would need to dissolve 180 g salt in 1800 g water, which is approximately equivalent to 1 cup of salt dissolved in 7.5 cups of water.

How salty is 10% salt? Have you ever accidentally swallowed water when swimming in the ocean? Seawater is 3.5% salt. Imagine drinking seawater that is 3 times saltier.
Which foods have enough salt (>10%) to stop bacteria growth?

Here is a sample list of foods which many people would consider “salty.” The percentage of salt is calculated by dividing the total weight of the food by the weight of salt.

1 serving McDonald’s French fries (medium): 266 mg/117 g = 0.2% salt
1 serving Doritos, Nacho Cheese flavor: 310 mg/50 g = 0.6% salt
1 serving Campbell’s chicken noodle soup (condensed): 890 mg/126 g = 0.7% salt
1 serving Hormel’s Spam: 767 mg/56 g = 1.4% salt

Note that none of these are even close to the 10% salt cutoff for preventing bacterial growth. Traditionally salt-preserved foods are either dried, such as beef jerky, or require refrigeration after opening, such as pickles or cured ham.

What about brines and condiments?

Brines and condiments are known to have high salt content, but do they meet the 10% salt requirement to inhibit bacterial growth?

1 packet ketchup: 67 mg/6 g = 1.1% salt
1 packet mustard: 57 mg/5 g = 1.1% salt
1 packet soy sauce: 493 mg/8 g = 6.1% salt
Poultry brine: 180,000 mg/7560 g = 2.3% salt

So, even soy sauce is not salty enough to prevent bacterial growth. Why can it be kept unrefrigerated? Since soy sauce does not have other essential ingredients necessary for microbial growth, such as proteins or carbohydrates, there is little risk to leaving it out on your countertop.

What about traditionally salt-preserved foods?

1 dill pickle: 1181 mg/135 g = 0.9% salt
1 piece beef jerky: 443 mg/20 g = 2.2% salt
1 serving ham: 1.2% salt

Even traditionally salt-preserved foods do not meet the 10% salt requirement to stop microbial growth. But additional features about these foods, such as dehydration (beef jerky) or addition of acid (pickles) or preservatives (ham), help prevent spoilage. In addition, many salt-preserved foods require refrigeration after opening in order to slow microbial growth.
Do higher salt levels prevent spoilage better than lower salt levels?

For most edible foods, the answer is no, unless you want to risk getting sodium poisoning. Most foods listed above have salt levels less than ~2% (with the exception of soy sauce). But did you know that bacteria grow best in conditions saltier than most foods we consume? Science labs where bacteria is routinely grown for experiments use a solution called “LB,” or Luria Broth, for optimal growth of bacteria. What is the salt concentration of LB? It is 1%, or roughly the saltiness of a dill pickle.


10 posted on 02/23/2013 6:14:53 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: freekitty

.


11 posted on 02/23/2013 6:17:30 AM PST by Ditter
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To: JoeProBono

I’m stockpiled for my family and now I need to tweak some things. My next project is to fix some Navy beans using the Hickory Smoke Flavored Spam instead of smoked ham hocks. If this works I’ll consider it a major coup.


12 posted on 02/23/2013 6:17:46 AM PST by Starstruck (I need a 30 round magazine because liberal whine gives me a buzz.)
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To: Mad Dawgg
That is a good place to start.

As you do more research you will probably want to do some home canning.

Remember to get the food you like "NOT" what someone else tells you is good.

13 posted on 02/23/2013 6:19:20 AM PST by knife6375 (US Navy Veteran)
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To: Mad Dawgg

“...stocking up I’ve been contemplating Corned Beef Hash and Beef stew.”

The beauty of things like that is they are pre-cooked. Of course they taste better when heated - but a good way to conserve fuel for things that MUST be cooked.


14 posted on 02/23/2013 6:19:53 AM PST by Psalm 73 ("Gentlemen, you can't fight in here - this is the War Room".)
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To: Starstruck


15 posted on 02/23/2013 6:20:42 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: JoeProBono
More than what I expected, but thanx for the information.

All I know is; too much salt ain't good for you.

16 posted on 02/23/2013 6:25:13 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: Psalm 73


17 posted on 02/23/2013 6:25:33 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: knarf


18 posted on 02/23/2013 6:27:53 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: knarf

I’ve noticed though that over the last few years many of the canned goods I buy (Hash and stew and such) have had their fat content AND their salt content cut a good bit.


19 posted on 02/23/2013 6:28:20 AM PST by Mad Dawgg (If you're going to deny my 1st Amendment rights then I must proceed to the 2nd one...)
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To: JoeProBono
Thanks Joe. Many good suggestions.
20 posted on 02/23/2013 6:29:36 AM PST by no-to-illegals (Please God, Protect and Bless Our Men and Women in Uniform with Victory. Amen.)
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To: JoeProBono

Been thinking about ordering some things from Mountain Home, Wise, or another Co.
Any experience or recommendations?
Most of the dehydrated items I see reconstitute to 4 servings or more. Just my wife and I.

You need pumpernickel, onion and mustard to go w/ the sardines. :)


21 posted on 02/23/2013 6:30:53 AM PST by Vinnie (A)
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To: Mad Dawgg
"For stocking up I’ve been contemplating Corned Beef Hash and Beef stew. (I’ve got some but I want to get more) Are these considered good items for stockpiling canned goods?"

Corned beef hash and beef stew were staples of MREs for years. They're pre-cooked so they can be eaten cold if you have no heat source.

22 posted on 02/23/2013 6:32:57 AM PST by Joe 6-pack (Qui me amat, amat et canem meum.)
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To: Vinnie
I buy ‘long lived food’ at Walmart by reading the dates on the label.
23 posted on 02/23/2013 6:49:30 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: knarf

If the time comes you need to rely on your canned foods, “too much salt” will be the least of your problems.


24 posted on 02/23/2013 6:52:28 AM PST by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: JoeProBono

It is SOP if the wife or I are at the market to always pick up a couple cans of SPAM, Corned Beef Hash, or Vienna Sausage. A few extra bucks spent now will be very wise investment when TSHTF.


25 posted on 02/23/2013 6:54:48 AM PST by Microbubba
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To: Microbubba
.... pick up a couple cans of SPAM, Corned Beef Hash,...

We do the same.
My biggest downfall is water. Only have some cases of bottled water.
Tried the milk jug thing, but the jugs disintegrate in a yr. or two.

26 posted on 02/23/2013 7:02:29 AM PST by Vinnie (A)
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To: Mad Dawgg

Every time I go to the grocery store, I pick up an extra can or two or three of some items. Most have ‘use by’ dates that are well in to 2015 and even 2016.

I rewrite the expiration month/year with a marker so they are readily identifiable, and I rotate by date.

Some cannned items to consider: Chicken, Tuna, Salmon, Ham/Spam, even Vienna Sausages, and, of course, veggies and soups.

Note that ‘cans’ typically have a lot of water/oil, whereas foil packs tend to be mostly meat product. Foil packs don’t seem to have quite as long a shelf life, but they don’t have to be drained.

Canned/foil pack meats are ‘ready to eat’.

Add packages of pasta. Just be sure to repack them into air tight and vermint-free containers. The ramen noodle packs are very cheap (about 25-cents) and they cook very quickly in a small amount of water.


27 posted on 02/23/2013 7:03:11 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: Microbubba


28 posted on 02/23/2013 7:04:14 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: TomGuy


29 posted on 02/23/2013 7:08:33 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: TomGuy

vermint = critter (mouse, insects, etc.)


30 posted on 02/23/2013 7:11:30 AM PST by TomGuy
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To: Microbubba
Don't forget a water supply (critical need) and foods for barter. Ramen noodles or the instant meals in a cup are light, cheap, easy to store, and last forever. When the SHTF, the neighbors who haven't planned are going to be hungry, and hungry people (especially with kids) will do desperate things. If they know you are a prepper, they WILL show up at your door. Be wary of charity (as they will tend keep coming back if they have the "entitlement mentality"). If you run into this situation, consider if they may have something you need or skill you could make use of. For example, I have a doctor acquaintance who has already stated my house will be his first stop when the SHTF. A doctor can come in very useful in the aftermath...

Plan now, build relationships now, so you know who you can trust. We've tentatively ID'd the ones to approach and work with, and the ones to avoid/turn away. If you have an Obama or Co-exist bumper sticker/yard sign, you're on your own!

Prepare...NOW! Network...NOW! After the curtains falls (and it will happen very fast), it will be too late...

31 posted on 02/23/2013 7:23:41 AM PST by Dubh_Ghlase (Therefore, send not to know For whom the bell tolls, It tolls for thee.)
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To: JoeProBono

For such a time as this . . . http://patburt.com/


32 posted on 02/23/2013 7:25:34 AM PST by Maudeen (Proverbs 3:5-6)
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To: Vinnie

NO to Wise Foods. They are bland and are not packaged properly for long term storage in spite of their claims. Mountain House meals are quite tasty and do have a long shelf life


33 posted on 02/23/2013 7:30:31 AM PST by ChocChipCookie
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To: Starstruck

That actually works well. Also works with split pea, lentils and black-eyed peas.


34 posted on 02/23/2013 7:52:36 AM PST by fuente
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To: Starstruck

That actually works well. Also works with split pea, lentils and black-eyed peas.


35 posted on 02/23/2013 7:52:47 AM PST by fuente
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To: Starstruck

That actually works well. Also works with split pea, lentils and black-eyed peas.


36 posted on 02/23/2013 7:52:58 AM PST by fuente
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To: JoeProBono

I’m trying out a can of “Mountain House freeze-dried Spaghetti and meat with sauce”. I figure that if THAT is halfway digestible then the Chicken and Terriyaki and such can’t be too bad.


37 posted on 02/23/2013 8:12:18 AM PST by TalBlack (Evil doesn't have a day job.)
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To: JoeProBono

38 posted on 02/23/2013 8:20:22 AM PST by Daffynition (The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted. — D.H.)
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To: Mad Dawgg

Stockpile what you currently eat and enjoy. You don’t want to be stuck eating cases of something you can’t stand. Have the family eat it a couple times before committing it to your preps.


39 posted on 02/23/2013 8:23:21 AM PST by bgill
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To: Vinnie

Really, don’t bother with the long term storage stuff at all. Do some “copy canning” until you have 3 months worth of what you already buy, then store rice, pasta, and dry beans.


40 posted on 02/23/2013 8:27:06 AM PST by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: TomGuy
Note that ‘cans’ typically have a lot of water/oil, whereas foil packs tend to be mostly meat product. Foil packs don’t seem to have quite as long a shelf life, but they don’t have to be drained.

Consider the "drain" as part of your water. It's a good thing. I keep a large container in the freezer that gets added to when I drain canned vegetables. Hey, it's free (already paid for) vegetable broth for a future soup.

41 posted on 02/23/2013 8:32:10 AM PST by bgill
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To: ChocChipCookie

Thanks for the tip.


42 posted on 02/23/2013 8:33:58 AM PST by Vinnie (A)
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To: Mad Dawgg

Every time I do my weekly grocery shopping I buy 6 cans of stew. I have many totes full. However, I also have a couple of hundred pounds of rice and a few more of pasta in long term storage. My plan is to use the stew to flavor the rice or pasta. You have to take a look at the caloric content of your food. A can of stew has surprisingly few calories, so I think you’ll need to supplement with rice or pasta to stretch it out. However, if heat or water are not available to cook, you can eat the stew straight out of the can. I’m sure others will have a different opionion but that’s mine and that’s my plan.


43 posted on 02/23/2013 8:57:49 AM PST by suthener
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To: suthener


44 posted on 02/23/2013 9:17:50 AM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: JoeProBono; All

I’ve been considering vacuum packing individual servings of bulk products such as rice and beans. wouldn’t this be a better way to preserve them, or would that affect their shelf life?


45 posted on 02/23/2013 10:02:50 AM PST by Sparky21555
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To: Microbubba

Vienna sausage does not hold up al that well past the “best by” date; won’t kill you but texture and taste go way south.


46 posted on 02/23/2013 10:04:19 AM PST by norton
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To: Vinnie
Tried the milk jug thing, but the jugs disintegrate in a yr. or two.

I tried those also, but for our Earthquake Prep Kit....but when Northridge hammered us, the tubs fell over and the jugs split, ruining all the paper goods stored alongside.

Lesson learned.

47 posted on 02/23/2013 10:10:22 AM PST by ErnBatavia (Piffle....)
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To: ChocChipCookie

Wholeheartedly agree!! Skip the Wise vegan foods.


48 posted on 02/23/2013 10:12:57 AM PST by SgtHooper (The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list.)
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To: MrB

Do not agree. Do both. Have at least 9-12 monhts of storage, with your home-canned/cooked stuff for the first 3 months, MREs for the next 3 months and freeze-dried/dehydrated stuffs for the last 3-6 months. The last two can be flipped as well, with the MREs as a last resort.


49 posted on 02/23/2013 10:17:21 AM PST by SgtHooper (The last thing I want to do is hurt you. But it's still on the list.)
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To: suthener
However, if heat or water are not available to cook, you can eat the stew straight out of the can.

Kelly Kettles for $85 are wonderful, burn wood, twigs, leaves, trash, or anything, and can boil a liter (about a quart) of water in three minutes from striking a match - I used flint and steel and it was under three minutes from starting to fill the "kettle" with water and then striking the flint until the water was boiling vigorously. Plus you can cook over them. (I hope there is no objection to a commercial link - I have no financial connection to the company, I just use and like their product.)

http://www.kellykettleusa.com/

50 posted on 02/23/2013 10:18:32 AM PST by Pollster1
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