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The Scattering - an epic story of Ireland's Great Famine
The Scattering Project ^ | March 1, 2002 | patrick monaghan

Posted on 02/27/2013 6:57:58 PM PST by Felis demulcta mitis

The Scattering is based on the book "Because They Never Do" by Patrick Erin Monaghan. This upcoming film will tell the untold, haunting love story of a young Irish couple who endure the horrors of the Great Irish Famine.

This Part 1 of a 5 part series to bring to bring to life the true story of the Great Irish Famine through the eyes of a young couple - Michael and Mary.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=c4IwVV7gufU


TOPICS: Books/Literature; History; Music/Entertainment
KEYWORDS: famine; fartyshadesofgreen; godsgravesglyphs; helixmakemineadouble; ireland; scattering

1 posted on 02/27/2013 6:58:11 PM PST by Felis demulcta mitis
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

My father’s grandfather was brought from County Kerry to New Orleans on a famine ship in 1850 by his father and step mother. He was eight years old. When I first saw the lazy beds in Ireland, which had not been cultivated since 1850, I cried. I don’t know if I can watch this series.


2 posted on 02/27/2013 7:09:50 PM PST by Mercat (Never laugh at live dragons)
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To: Mercat

Slattery, County Cork. Thanks for making it here, great grandpa!


3 posted on 02/27/2013 7:28:45 PM PST by Chainmail (A simple rule of life: if you can be blamed, you're responsible.)
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To: Mercat

My Great-great-grandfather Andrew was born in Ireland in 1840, died in the US.

I’m guessing he came to the New World before his tenth birthday.


4 posted on 02/27/2013 7:38:42 PM PST by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: DuncanWaring
Still, a bit more than half the people in this country of Irish descent never had an ancestor arrive pursuant to the famine ~ they came earlier, or they came later.

Which is a different sort of problem ~ but I think Irish independence solved that part.

The famine refugees were more likely from Germany and Scandinavia ~ which doesn't mean they weren't really Irish but they probably weren't.

Here's a recipe handed down. Take some meat ~ if you have meat. Chop it up. Chop a potato into slices. Put in a pan. Bring it to a boil. Wait until the slices are transluscent ~ about 2 or 3 minutes. Toss in the meat. Stir. Wait until brown or gray.

Serve hot. Feeds a small family.

No meat? Slice the potato thinner.

5 posted on 02/27/2013 7:56:48 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: Mercat

The video is just part of a powerpoint presentation my dad, patrick, and I created several years ago. All part one really does is show facts about how the Irish lived during those times.

As for the two names mentioned, Michael and Mary, they were my great great .... grandparents who came to America around the same time as your father’s grandfather.


6 posted on 02/27/2013 7:59:18 PM PST by Felis demulcta mitis
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

And guess what?

The British banned the Irish from owning guns.


7 posted on 02/27/2013 8:01:36 PM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: 2banana

and British rule helped create the famine


8 posted on 02/27/2013 8:05:39 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: muawiyah

“No meat? Slice the potato thinner.”

I lived in Northern Ireland 78 - 81, and I am quite familiar with Irish history. I also had an experience that to this day sticks with me...

I went into my local butcher shop, the butcher knew me from numerous other visits...a week earlier I had him set aside a piece of beef loin so that it would age...then I came in to have it cut into four, very nice, thick Porterhouse steaks...

He asked me as he was cutting them...’Mr ____, is it expected that one of these steaks is to fead one person?’ I replied, ‘Yes’. He then said, ‘Over here one of those would feed a whole family.’

This is a long time after the famine, but the idea is still there in that culture. Food is precious. Then and now. The next war, here in this country, Revolutionary War II, will be touched off by a contrived crisis that cuts off supply of all of our daily needs.


9 posted on 02/27/2013 8:19:51 PM PST by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders.)
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

Blessings...I wish you to see my post No 9...I know much of the history, but not as well as you know it. I know that there was no need for the famine...the English were responsible for the people of Ireland and their well being. They failed...in many evil ways. I could say more...


10 posted on 02/27/2013 8:24:59 PM PST by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders.)
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To: muawiyah

“Still, a bit more than half the people in this country of Irish descent never had an ancestor arrive pursuant to the famine ~ they came earlier, or they came later.”

I can attest to that. My Irish ancestors headed for North America due to Oliver Cromwell. They were landed Irish gentry near Cork and he took their land. Must have been around 1650, details are scarce. I can find the family name, which is rare, on old landmarks on the Delmarva peninsula.


11 posted on 02/27/2013 8:32:18 PM PST by Pelham (Marco Rubio. for Amnesty, Spanish, and Karl Rove.)
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To: silverleaf

mark this to read later


12 posted on 02/27/2013 8:47:37 PM PST by silverleaf (Age Takes a Toll: Please Have Exact Change)
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To: Felis demulcta mitis
Thank the Brits for all of this....yaaa...thank 'em all right.

Same same happen to my ancestors in Scotland....thank the Brits.
13 posted on 02/27/2013 8:53:06 PM PST by Tainan (Cogito, ergo conservatus sum -- "The Taliban is inside the building")
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

http://www.irishholocaust.org/home

One of many sources on the subject of the Irish Famine...

A famine not by a potato blight, but human caused...

Food was removed from Ireland, and the Irish people were starved...


14 posted on 02/27/2013 9:00:57 PM PST by elteemike (Light travels faster than sound...That's why so many people appear bright until you hear them speak!)
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

Great-grandfather and his parents and siblings, Protestant Irish, emigrated from County Cavan to Newfoundland during the Famine. A cholera epidemic (the “Irish Disease”) hit the ship during the voyage. Everyone in the family died, except my great-grandfather and his father. It was all recorded in the family Bible they carried on the voyage that we still have.


15 posted on 02/27/2013 9:28:06 PM PST by kaehurowing
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To: muawiyah

Black 48!


16 posted on 02/27/2013 9:54:44 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

The famine hit especially hard in southern and western Ireland. On a trip there four years ago, my wife and I observed many “famine houses,” deserted stone homes that dotted the countryside. One time we arrived at a b&b in Doolin wondering why we hadn’t seen a famine house yet. Then I opened the curtains in the room. Right across the street from the b&b was a famine house.


17 posted on 02/28/2013 2:40:51 AM PST by driftless2
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

Phytophthora infestans, aka Late blight.

Decimated my tomatoes last year, my potatoes, which were only about ten feet away, were happy as clams!


18 posted on 02/28/2013 2:46:39 AM PST by djf (I don't want to be safe. I want to be FREE!)
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To: Pelham
You might enjoy Cromwell In Ireland by RTE. It's very well done but sadly cut up into 10 minute segments on YouTube.
19 posted on 02/28/2013 4:32:51 AM PST by Oratam
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To: driftless2

Which is your favorite: O’Connor’s, McGann’s, or McDermott’s?


20 posted on 02/28/2013 4:39:16 AM PST by Oratam
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

Half my Irish family came in the 1850s. The other part came in the 1880s.

They were from County Mayo and County Galway (respectively): County Mayo was especially hard hit by the blight and famine. I don’t know for sure, but I’m guessing the County Mayo part of the family was escaping the famine.


21 posted on 02/28/2013 4:59:56 AM PST by Betis70 ("Leading from Behind" gets your Ambassador killed)
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To: Pelham
Forgot to mention it but there were SEVERAL famines in the 1800s. The first one occurs roughly between 1810 to 1813. That overlaps an exciting period in the Napoleonic Wars. It usually isn't mentioned as part of European history since it only hit the European Arctic, parts of Western Russia, and Central Asia ~ with a huge chunk of Siberia and China.

Virtually all the Sa'ami in the Sapma moved West and South out of the Kola peninsula. Siberia was denuded of animals all the way to the Pacific. That's one of the reasons the fur hunters traveled all the way around Siberia on the Arctic passage (in season) to get furs in Alaska. They also found they needed to buy vegetables for human consumption from the Spanish in the San Francisco Bay region.

Every now and then someone will mention a famine in the late 1700s ~ but it's not well documented so no one knows where it hit.

22 posted on 02/28/2013 5:05:14 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: Betis70

I should clarify, the County Mayo part of the family show up in the 1850 census, which is why I suspect they were escaping the famine.


23 posted on 02/28/2013 5:10:05 AM PST by Betis70 ("Leading from Behind" gets your Ambassador killed)
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

I don’t understand, is this a documentary coming to cable TV, the theaters or a DVD?


24 posted on 02/28/2013 5:31:56 AM PST by Hot Tabasco (God bless you Tommy and thank you for your service: http://swiftboats.org/tribute/tribute.html)
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To: muawiyah

Interesting info.

From what I understand the Great Famine killed as many people as those who were able to flee Ireland (about a million of each).

Apparently there was another famine in the 1879-1880 in the west of Ireland, which might explain why my County Galway family finally fled, though I have distant relatives that live there.


25 posted on 02/28/2013 5:37:26 AM PST by Betis70 ("Leading from Behind" gets your Ambassador killed)
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To: Hot Tabasco

Coming to Youtube I suspect.


26 posted on 02/28/2013 5:39:11 AM PST by Betis70 ("Leading from Behind" gets your Ambassador killed)
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To: Felis demulcta mitis

County Longford prior to 1836.


27 posted on 02/28/2013 5:43:21 AM PST by wordsofearnest (Proper aim of giving is to put the recipient in a state where he no longer needs it. C.S. Lewis)
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To: Oratam

If you mean Frank O’Connor I read a volume of his short stories some years ago. Can’t remember much of them unfortunately.


28 posted on 02/28/2013 8:31:20 AM PST by driftless2
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To: Mercat

My family came from County Cork during “An Gorta Mor”
(The Great Hunger). I don’t think I can watch this film. Its too heartbreaking.


29 posted on 02/28/2013 10:46:13 AM PST by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Note: this topic is dated 2/27/2013.

Thanks Felis demulcta mitis.

Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


30 posted on 03/15/2013 7:57:17 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c4IwVV7gufU


31 posted on 03/15/2013 8:04:17 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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