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The world’s oldest horse, an Irish draught named Shayne, is put to sleep
irishcentral.com ^ | March 8, 2013 | staff

Posted on 03/08/2013 5:58:37 AM PST by 1rudeboy

An Irish draught horse named Shayne, who was believed to be the world’s oldest horse, was put to sleep last month after a long, happy and healthy life of 51 years.

The DailyMail reports on Shayne, who was put down after a battle with arthritis left him incapable of standing up on his own.

Shayne was living at the 40-acre Remus Memorial Horse Sanctuary in his final days, where he enjoyed up to five hours outside a day, and a healthy diet of four meals daily.

Sue Burton, the founder of the Sanctuary in Essex, England said, “Shayne was a happy horse, a lovely old boy and we are proud to have known him.”

“He was great to own and we are delighted to have had him and we shall miss him dearly.”

Burton attributes Shayne’s longevity to the fact that he had a pleasant personality, and that his previous owners never overworked him.

“He was such a lovely horse with a great character and he showed how good a horse of this age could look,” said Burton.

Shayne, who stood at 15 hands and weighed over 1,050 pounds, was put to sleep after he collapsed on February 22.

Shayne’s remains were taken for cremation at Row Green Equine and Pet Crematorium in Braintree, where he was cremated without fee.

Ella Martin, from Row Green, said, “It was an honor to be asked to collect Shayne.”

“We have worked with Remus Horse Sanctuary for many years and as a token to Sue and her team we offered to cremate him free of charge, a fitting tribute.”

The previous title of oldest living horse in the world was held by Welsh/Arab steed Badger, from Pembrokeshire, Wales, who died aged 51, in in 2004. Last year, the Guinness World Records team said nobody had laid claim to the title since Badger's death.

Staff at the sanctuary believed Shayne to be 51 based on the date of birth given by his previous owner, and medical checks, which included examining the condition of the horse’s teeth for length, wear, and how deep the grooves are.

As Shayne's birth was believed to be before horse passports were introduced, there would only be paperwork detailing the exact date if he were a purebreed.

A British Horse Society spokesman estimated that Shayne's years made him the human equivalent of more than 100. However, the spokesman said 'the older they get, the harder it is to tell,' especially when horses get past their average life expectancy of early thirties.

On average, every horse year beyond the age of four is roughly the same as 2.5 human years.

Elderly Shayne fell a little way short of laying claim to being the oldest horse in history. That title belongs to 'Old Billy' who was foaled in Woolston, Lancashire and had reached the age of 62 when he died in 1822.


TOPICS: Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS:
I can make a General in five minutes but a good horse is hard to replace.
--Abraham Lincoln

1 posted on 03/08/2013 5:58:37 AM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

The BBQ was later that afternoon.


2 posted on 03/08/2013 6:01:35 AM PST by BigCinBigD (...Was that okay?)
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To: 1rudeboy
Thanks for the post.
If given a choice between an iron horse and a flesh and blood horse - I'd choose the real horse everytime.
Don't get me wrong - I would really like to own a nice bike, but would love a good horse. Forever.
3 posted on 03/08/2013 6:08:46 AM PST by Psalm 73 ("Gentlemen, you can't fight in here - this is the War Room".)
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To: 1rudeboy

Amazing! RIP, sweet horse.

But, what kind of draft? This horse sound the size of a short Thoroughbred. Hardly the weight of a draft I expect.


4 posted on 03/08/2013 6:09:06 AM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: 1rudeboy

A fine looking horse.

5 posted on 03/08/2013 6:12:30 AM PST by JRios1968 (I'm guttery and trashy, with a hint of lemon. - Laz)
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To: the OlLine Rebel

“Irish draft” actually is the name of the breed.


6 posted on 03/08/2013 6:12:55 AM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: Psalm 73

Well, given the iron horse is a locomotive engine, it’s a bit tougher choice.


7 posted on 03/08/2013 6:12:58 AM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: 1rudeboy
I'd spend hours of days in the library doing tediously what I can do instantly with a computer.

Thank you Bill Gates and others;

So Long, Old Friend

8 posted on 03/08/2013 6:13:00 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: 1rudeboy

I know. My point is just how small can it be? 1000lbs is not heavy for a draft.


9 posted on 03/08/2013 6:14:10 AM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: the OlLine Rebel
Oh, and they are big. Trust me on this one . . . you don't want one stepping on your foot.
10 posted on 03/08/2013 6:15:03 AM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

I had a Shetland that I had to put down several years ago that was in his late forties. My Arabian Stallion lived to 36 and was still breeding at 34.


11 posted on 03/08/2013 6:15:07 AM PST by vetvetdoug
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To: the OlLine Rebel

I’m guessing that he dropped weight as he grew older. If they were feeding him four times a day, it suggests that they were trying to keep his weight up.


12 posted on 03/08/2013 6:17:41 AM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy; All

WOW! Great post and thread.


13 posted on 03/08/2013 6:26:24 AM PST by PGalt
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To: vetvetdoug

Usually the smaller the horse, the longer they live. Shayne was a big guy (obviously not Clydesdale size, but definitely a draft horse) and it’s really remarkable that he lived this long.

But he has an alert, kindly look, and I think horses, like human beings, have “personalities” which determine everything from how well they get along with people (thus letting them receive more care) to how long they live.

I have a little horse (pony sized but not a pony breed) who’s heading towards 27. He’s not a great riding animal and never has been, but he is a real love-sponge and I think that’s what keeps him going.


14 posted on 03/08/2013 6:46:49 AM PST by livius
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To: JRios1968

Awww, he actually looked a little wrinkled. Bless his sweet heart.


15 posted on 03/08/2013 7:02:47 AM PST by CatherineofAragon (Support Christian white males---the architects of the jewel known as Western Civilization)
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To: 1rudeboy

Some years ago at the St. Paul, OR, rodeo, the announcer told us that one of the bucking horses was 27. I don’t remember whether he got the rider off.


16 posted on 03/08/2013 7:07:06 AM PST by HartleyMBaldwin
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To: HartleyMBaldwin

The horse, that is, not the announcer.


17 posted on 03/08/2013 7:08:40 AM PST by HartleyMBaldwin
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To: HartleyMBaldwin

Thanks for the first great laugh of the day!!


18 posted on 03/08/2013 7:34:31 AM PST by Donkey Odious ( Adapt, improvise, and overcome - now a motto for us all.)
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To: 1rudeboy
Cremated?..A likely story...

He'll be back..either in Taco Bell or Burger King..

19 posted on 03/08/2013 7:58:04 AM PST by ken5050 ("One useless man is a shame, two are a law firm, three or more are a Congress".. John Adams)
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To: vetvetdoug

I don’t know much about horses, but have heard that keeping a stallion is a lot of work. Why would that be?......GG


20 posted on 03/08/2013 10:23:57 AM PST by goat granny
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To: 1rudeboy

What happens is their teeth fail and they just can’t process food very well when they get old.

Horses are very suseptable to dental problems which often go untreated mainly because owners and even most vets don’t really know a lot about equine dentistry.


21 posted on 03/08/2013 10:29:17 AM PST by Cuttnhorse
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To: the OlLine Rebel

He’s probably 1/2 Thoroughbred and 1/2 Draft horse. This is a mix between a “light” horse and a “heavy” one. Their legs are thicker and often feathered, like a Clydedale’s, but the bodies are lighter in weight.


22 posted on 03/08/2013 11:05:17 AM PST by Amberdawn
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To: Cuttnhorse

True, but you can keep the horse on a special diet. It’s not easy, though.


23 posted on 03/08/2013 1:05:39 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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