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The Closest Star System Found in a Century
Penn State News ^ | 3/11/13

Posted on 03/11/2013 1:36:18 PM PDT by LibWhacker

A pair of newly discovered stars is the third-closest star system to the Sun, according to a paper that will be published in Astrophysical Journal Letters. The duo is the closest star system discovered since 1916. The discovery was made by Kevin Luhman, an associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics at Penn State University and a researcher in Penn State's Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds.

Both stars in the new binary system are "brown dwarfs," which are stars that are too small in mass to ever become hot enough to ignite hydrogen fusion. As a result, they are very cool and dim, resembling a giant planet like Jupiter more than a bright star like the Sun. Image of WISE J104915.57-531906, taken by the WISE satellite.

"The distance to this brown dwarf pair is 6.5 light years -- so close that Earth's television transmissions from 2006 are now arriving there," Luhman said. "It will be an excellent hunting ground for planets because it is very close to Earth, which makes it a lot easier to see any planets orbiting either of the brown dwarfs." Since it is the third-closest star system, in the distant future it might be one of the first destinations for manned expeditions outside our solar system, Luhman said.

The star system is named "WISE J104915.57-531906" because it was discovered in a map of the entire sky obtained by the NASA-funded Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite. It is only slightly farther away than the second-closest star, Barnard's star, which was discovered 6.0 light years from the Sun in 1916. The closest star system consists of Alpha Centauri, found to be a neighbor of the Sun in 1839 at 4.4 light years, and the fainter Proxima Centauri, discovered in 1917 at 4.2 light years.

Edward (Ned) Wright, the principal investigator for the WISE satellite, said "One major goal when proposing WISE was to find the closest stars to the Sun. WISE 1049-5319 is by far the closest star found to date using the WISE data, and the close-up views of this binary system we can get with big telescopes like Gemini and the future James Webb Space Telescope will tell us a lot about the low mass stars known as brown dwarfs." Wright is the David Saxon Presidential Chair in Physics and a professor of physics and astronomy at UCLA. Map showing distance of various stellar objects from sun, in light years.

Astronomers have long speculated about the possible presence of a distant, dim object orbiting the Sun, which is sometimes called Nemesis. However, Luhman has concluded, "we can rule out that the new brown dwarf system is such an object because it is moving across the sky much too fast to be in orbit around the Sun."

To discover the new star system, Luhman studied the images of the sky that the WISE satellite had obtained during a 13-month period ending in 2011. During its mission, WISE observed each point in the sky 2 to 3 times. "In these time-lapse images, I was able to tell that this system was moving very quickly across the sky -- which was a big clue that it was probably very close to our solar system," Luhman said.

After noticing its rapid motion in the WISE images, Luhman went hunting for detections of the suspected nearby star in older sky surveys. He found that it indeed was detected in images spanning from 1978 to 1999 from the Digitized Sky Survey, the Two Micron All-Sky Survey, and the Deep Near Infrared Survey of the Southern Sky. "Based on how this star system was moving in the images from the WISE survey, I was able to extrapolate back in time to predict where it should have been located in the older surveys and, sure enough, it was there," Luhman said.

By combining the detections of the star system from the various surveys, Luhman was able to measure its distance via parallax, which is the apparent shift of a star in the sky due to the Earth's orbit around the Sun. He then used the Gemini South telescope on Cerro Pachón in Chile to obtain a spectrum of it, which demonstrated that it had a very cool temperature, and hence was a brown dwarf. "As an unexpected bonus, the sharp images from Gemini also revealed that the object actually was not just one but a pair of brown dwarfs orbiting each other," Luhman said.

"It was a lot of detective work," Luhman said. "There are billions of infrared points of light across the sky, and the mystery is which one -- if any of them -- could be a star that is very close to our solar system."


TOPICS: Astronomy; Science
KEYWORDS: browndwarfs; closest; dwarf; earth; star; xplanets

1 posted on 03/11/2013 1:36:18 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: LibWhacker
Are brown dwarfs bound to go the way of midget pickles?

Where are the outraged PC police?

2 posted on 03/11/2013 1:43:28 PM PDT by AZLiberty (No tag today.)
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To: LibWhacker

I have to wonder if there are some brown dwarfs hiding out there that are a LOT closer which would explain the comets being kicked into the solar system lately...

I think if there was a small brown dwarf system less than or around 1 LY away it could prove to be a great test bed location for an interstellar probe shakedown cruise in the future...


3 posted on 03/11/2013 1:53:29 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: LibWhacker

I can’t imagine that brown dwarfs would have planets even remotely like what we would consider habitable.


4 posted on 03/11/2013 2:03:30 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: LibWhacker
Great post.

Thank you for sharing it.

5 posted on 03/11/2013 2:14:32 PM PDT by sauron ("Truth is hate to those who hate Truth" --unknown)
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To: cripplecreek

That would make a fantastic sci-fi story. A planet orbiting a brown dwarf for billions of years, never getting full sunlight, but somehow life evolves into an intelligent species. Near permanent darkness would guarantee extreme sensitivity to light in the infrared spectrum..............


6 posted on 03/11/2013 2:23:44 PM PDT by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
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To: Red Badger

Maybe a planet with deep oceans with volcanic vents.


7 posted on 03/11/2013 2:25:17 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek; GraceG
I can’t imagine that brown dwarfs would have planets even remotely like what we would consider habitable.

You'd be talking about a planet orbiting inside the heliosphere or plasma sheath of a dwarf star with heat reflected back onto the planet more or less equally from all directions. Some scientists are now claiming tha would be the MOST likely scenario for habitable planets.

8 posted on 03/11/2013 3:42:02 PM PDT by varmintman
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To: LibWhacker

They must produce light or we wouldn’t be able to see them. Jupiter does not produce its own light but reflects light from the sun.


9 posted on 03/11/2013 3:44:53 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: varmintman

Its an interesting possibility. I know that Saturn has an enormous magnetic field and it seems likely that a brown dwarf would have the same as well. This would offer a fair amount of protection for a close orbit planet.


10 posted on 03/11/2013 3:54:21 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Verginius Rufus

We see brown dwarfs with infrared telescopes. The same with red dwarfs. Red dwarfs make up something like 80% of the stars in the universe.

Red dwarfs do emit visible light but they’re pretty dim so not one is visible with the naked eye from earth. The nearest is Proxima Centauri at 4.5 light years.


11 posted on 03/11/2013 4:01:02 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: SunkenCiv

*ping*


12 posted on 03/11/2013 5:18:43 PM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (Resist We Much)
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To: cripplecreek

According to Wikipedia, Proxima Centauri is 400 times as far from Alpha Centauri A & B as Neptune is from the sun, and would appear only as a fifth-magnitude star viewed from Alpha Centauri. Apparently it hasn’t been conclusively proven that it is gravitationally connected with the two brighter stars although it seems to be.


13 posted on 03/11/2013 5:52:47 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: Verginius Rufus

Proxima Centauri is something like 11.5 magnitude from earth.

Kinda like trying to spot a single birthday candle from 10 miles away.


14 posted on 03/11/2013 6:22:55 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

Ever wonder why the two chieftain gods of every one of the ancient pantheon/astral religions were Jupiter and Saturn and not the sun and the moon?


15 posted on 03/11/2013 7:54:13 PM PDT by varmintman
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To: fieldmarshaldj; KevinDavis; annie laurie; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; Ernest_at_the_Beach; ...

Thanks fieldmarshaldj.
 
X-Planets
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
Google news searches: exoplanet · exosolar · extrasolar ·

16 posted on 03/11/2013 7:57:51 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: brytlea; cripplecreek; decimon; bigheadfred; KoRn; Grammy; married21; steelyourfaith; Mmogamer; ...

Thanks fieldmarshaldj.

An ‘extra, extra’ to APoD members.


17 posted on 03/11/2013 7:59:15 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: AZLiberty
Are brown dwarfs bound to go the way of midget pickles?


18 posted on 03/11/2013 8:28:49 PM PDT by null and void (Gun confiscation enables tyranny. Don't enable tyranny.)
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To: null and void
Are brown dwarfs bound to go the way of midget pickles?

Thanks for the photo. I suppose anyone who missed the midget pickle thread must be very confused about my statement. A recent article said that an upset mom with a diminutive child convinced the Cains food company to rename its midget pickles. I'm waiting for her to go after astronomers.

19 posted on 03/11/2013 9:28:57 PM PDT by AZLiberty (No tag today.)
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To: AZLiberty

20 posted on 03/11/2013 9:31:21 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: cripplecreek
Brown dwarfs can remain hot for many billions of years after their formation, even without fusion at the core, just as the Earth's interior is still quite hot billions of years after its formation. I suppose there could conceivably be some possibilities for life there, if a planet orbited close enough to its brown dwarf parent, Io notwithstanding.

If there were inhabited planets in orbit around brown dwarfs, it seems most likely to me they'd be Europa-type planets with life possibly existing in oceans under thick ice layers, not places for us!

21 posted on 03/11/2013 9:40:28 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: AZLiberty
Thanks for the photo.

I have no idea who the guy is, but he has a great face and aspect. First used him on a Gurkha thread...

22 posted on 03/11/2013 10:08:44 PM PDT by null and void (Gun confiscation enables tyranny. Don't enable tyranny.)
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To: cripplecreek

It would necessarily need oceans, and it would probably have a fair amount of vulcanism. It would also need to be much closer to its ‘sun’ to get its radiated heat to keep it from freezing, say at the orbit of Mercury, and a nitrogen/oxygen atmosphere with a mass near that of Earth’s.

Its ‘sun’ would block out most of the sky during the ‘day’ and just be a big, velvety black spot to us, but to ‘them’ it would be a blazing inferno, just as Sol appears to us, because of their sensitivity in the infra-red region of the spectrum.

Green plants would be practically non-existent, except as scientific curiosities. Fungal growth would be like forests, with mushrooms the size of redwoods. Grasslands would be replaced by carpets of fungal communities and small bush sized fungal growths.

Animals would have evolved more slowly, but still they would differentiate into fungi-eaters and meat-eaters to preserve the predator-prey balance.

A dark world , to be sure, but colors would still be found in the flora and fauna simply due to natural selection and the need for camouflage, like we have fishes of very bright colors but they cannot see the colors due to the sunlight filtering of the water.

Imagine a sentient species evolving that would be able to ‘see’ in infrared. They would have very large ‘eyes’ that would gather as much ‘light’ as is possible, just like our night creatures that have large eyes for night time hunting as well as for protection from predators. Kinda sounds like the ubiquitous space alien caricature with the small heads and over sized teardrop shaped eyes.........


23 posted on 03/12/2013 6:41:42 AM PDT by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
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To: Red Badger
Imagine a sentient species evolving that would be able to ‘see’ in infrared. They would have very large ‘eyes’ that would gather as much ‘light’ as is possible, just like our night creatures that have large eyes for night time hunting as well as for protection from predators. Kinda sounds like the ubiquitous space alien caricature with the small heads and over sized teardrop shaped eyes.........

Venramini's Neanderthal reconstruction, the first thing you notice is the huge eyes (Neanderthal eye sockets 2+ times the size of ours):

 photo n5.gif

Image courtesy www.themandus.org, Ice-Age fur coat removed for illustration purposes...

24 posted on 03/12/2013 7:26:37 AM PDT by varmintman
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To: varmintman

And the reason why we should pay attention to the theories of Danny Vendramini, a TV producer and scriptwriter with no academic credentials, is?


25 posted on 03/12/2013 7:36:44 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: varmintman

Gee, Grandma, what big eyes you have!..........


26 posted on 03/12/2013 7:49:13 AM PDT by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
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To: Red Badger
Image Hosted by ImageShack.us
27 posted on 03/12/2013 7:52:21 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

Red Dwarf star, much closer than 4.5 light years..........

28 posted on 03/12/2013 7:52:50 AM PDT by Red Badger (Lincoln freed the slaves. Obama just got them ALL back......................)
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To: PapaBear3625

The reason is, that Vendramini has figured out what Neanderthals actually looked like, and all of the “brilliant scientists(TM)” who’ve studied the fricking things for the past 150 years, haven’t. Granted Vendramini’s theory of Neanderthal predation driving gracile (Skhul/Qafzeh) hominids to punc-eek their way into modern men is BS, his reconstruction of the Neanderthal is totally believable.


29 posted on 03/12/2013 8:15:40 AM PDT by varmintman
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To: LibWhacker
Both stars in the new binary system are "brown dwarfs," which are stars that are too small in mass to ever become hot enough to ignite hydrogen fusion. As a result, they are very cool and dim...

Name the first one "John" and the other "Lyndsey".

30 posted on 03/12/2013 8:17:56 AM PDT by COBOL2Java (Fighting Obama without Boehner & McConnell is like going deer hunting without your accordion)
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To: varmintman
The reason is, that Vendramini has figured out what Neanderthals actually looked like, and all of the “brilliant scientists(TM)” who’ve studied the fricking things for the past 150 years, haven’t.

No, Vendramini has come out with an alternate theory for what Neanderthals actually looked like. Nobody has seen an actual Neanderthal in the flesh.

Forensic reconstruction of faces from skulls is an established field. People who do it for a living have lots of feedback based on later determination of who it was who belonged to the skull. I trust their determinations more than I trust Vendramini.


31 posted on 03/12/2013 8:28:53 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: PapaBear3625
That's fiction.

Neanderthal footprint(real, not artist conception):

Next time it rains, find some mud and see if you can make a footprint like that.

Neanderthal and human skeletons:

Note the cylindrical human ribcage and the conical Neanderthal rib cage. The conical primate rib cage simply allows room for the gigantic primate upper-body musculature.

Homo Erectus ("Turkana Boy") skeleton and reconstruction (Wikipedia), note the conical rib cage and also note that other than for the smooth skin which is wrong, scientists don't have any problem presenting Erectus (a close cousin of the Neanderthal) as a glorified ape which is in fact what both of them were:

The Neanderthal is generally presented as a slightly backwards or Down-Syndrome-like human because he has become a sort of a poster child for kum-bay-ah religion and scientific yuppyism. Representations from the late 1800s and early 1900s (i.e. from prior to the yuppifaction of science) looked much more like Vendramini's, e.g. Pierre Boule's reconstruction:

This is a case of the scholars from 1900 having it right or nearly right, and of more modern researchers having gone astray.

Aside from everything else, there's the question of no Neanderthal needles having ever been found (Cro Magnon needles are common); basic reality is that a creature with a 6" Ice-Age fur coat doesn't NEED needles...

32 posted on 03/12/2013 9:30:39 AM PDT by varmintman
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