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Homeschooling (Vanity)
Me

Posted on 03/11/2013 8:11:33 PM PDT by MacMattico

I never thought of Homeschooling as a viable alternative, but now I'm at my wits end with my daughter's HS. This was my HS in the late 80's and I thought it was great. I went to a good college and got good grades. But now their policies having to do with grading are all over the place, two specific subject teachers seem totally out of their element, and I asked and was even told by the Principal that there are certain things he would change, but he can't go against the union contract! My daughter missed a whole week of Social Studies (they have block scheduling and for reasons I won't bore you with missed the two days that week covering, of all things, Islam and the crusades). Her teacher said she needed to stay after to make it up, get notes, and study. I said no, I would teach it to her, just give her the work and review sheet. It's apparent I'm not this teachers favorite person. Well, to make a long story short, we worked on it over last weekend and she took the exam with the rest of the class on schedule. This teacher always makes a big deal out of "who got the highest grade" on a test. She said literally nothing to my daughter and hasn't called on her in a week. The student teacher told my daughter "congratulations, you're the only one that got 100 on the test. No one else even got in the 90's and the questions were directly from past regents (state) exams". What the heck are teachers teaching? It's the same in a couple of other classes. All year has been a struggle for ME to teach her what she needs to know. If it was just her, fine, but I've found out many of her honors friends are having the same problems. There's literally been teacher/parents verbal fights in the hallways! (not me)


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Education
KEYWORDS: arth; education; frhf; highschool; homeschooling
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So is homeschooling a viable option? Catholic school? (although that would be $10,000 x 2 kids-- yikes!) I'm worried if I home schooled we'd get lazy and off track. They'd miss their sports, music and socialization wouldn't they? I have one daughter with a learning disability and one (the one in HS) that is an excellent student with bad teachers. Moving to a different district would be difficult. How has homeschooling worked for those of you that did it? What about grades and transcripts for college?
1 posted on 03/11/2013 8:11:33 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico

Missed that class on use of paragraphs?


2 posted on 03/11/2013 8:14:12 PM PDT by OKRA2012
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To: Mears

bfl


3 posted on 03/11/2013 8:15:15 PM PDT by Mears
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To: MacMattico

Oh, and I help run a business with my husband, but I can basically work when I want to. 20-25/hrs a week and I can get my work done. Is there enough time? And does being parent/ teacher 24/7 cause parent/teen tension?


4 posted on 03/11/2013 8:18:16 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico

I could tell you a story...


5 posted on 03/11/2013 8:19:17 PM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (Resist We Much)
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To: MacMattico

I home schooled all 4 of my children through high school. It was the best decision my husband and I ever made.

When there were classes that I felt more insecure about teaching, I traded with other home school moms for classes I was better able to teach.

There is a freedom in home schooling that cannot be found either the public or private school systems.


6 posted on 03/11/2013 8:20:32 PM PDT by rbbeachkid (Get out of its way and small business can fix the economy.)
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To: MacMattico

Would never want to do anything else. My eldest is now finishing up. Never set foot in a school. Got academic scholarship. Colleges seek out homeschoolers.

If you are worried about staying on track, get a pre-packaged curriculum like Seton.

It doesn’t take much work! With young kids, 2-3 hours/day. After age 8 or 9, give them the lesson plan and they do it themselves, so they can go out to play.

Remember that your job is to raise saints, not college students. And home is the best place for that. Academic excellence is a side benefit.

Regarding special needs kids, we have some experience with that. Our youngest was recently diagnosed with mild autism. We knew that she had more difficulty than our other daughter. My wife’s three teacher SILs badgered my wife to put our daughter in school to get “special services.”

We met with a team of specialists from the school three times over the summer. They wrote up a fancy individualized program (IEP). In practice, they just dumped my daughter in the dumb class, where she is covering stuff she learned two years ago. It’s a pathetic joke.

Remember, no one loves your children like you do.

If you have any other questions, feel free to Freepmail.


7 posted on 03/11/2013 8:25:40 PM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: rbbeachkid

What curriculum did you use?


8 posted on 03/11/2013 8:25:42 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: fieldmarshaldj

Do tell!


9 posted on 03/11/2013 8:29:04 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico; wintertime

It’s JUST YOU being a bit oversensitive. Everything in education is PERFECTLY FINE - but you seem to think the drill-and-kill policies of the past that you’re so familiar with can work with today’s children - most of whom spend their whole lives on Facebook and playing video games. The methods used today are MUCH BETTER. You may not understand them, and they may even look a bit odd...but trust us, we know what’s best for (y)our children.

...well, that is the way the school will answer you. It’s standard operating policy - they will first isolate you, and then cut you down. You’ll also find a good number of people on this site trying to figure out if you’ve spent your entire adult life in a cave, not knowing what’s REALLY going on in public schools (and yes, yours is included). We have daily threads on it and there are countless websites...but you do have to first leave the mindset that your interests (i.e., well rounded and well educated kids) have anything at all in common with their interests (to have kids grow up as statists). Once you get there, then things will fall into place and start to make sense.

So yes, get her (or them) OUT NOW!!!


10 posted on 03/11/2013 8:29:08 PM PDT by BobL (Look up "CSCOPE" if you want to see something really scary)
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To: MacMattico; metmom; wintertime

My wife and I are homeschooling our 5-year-old daughter. We figure we can’t do any worse than the public schools that continue to pump out illiterate libtards in massive quantities.

To keep from getting lazy and off track, you need to keep a daily record of what you are teaching your child. It helps because if you get sidetracked for a few days, you’ll look at your daily record and freak out about having slacked off so much and will jump right back in there.

Also, you can use your daily records to create a transcript for your child that will be accepted by a college. That way, you can skip the GED route.

I’m PINGing Wintertime and Metmom for you. They more experience with older children and are better equipped to answer your questions.

Cheers!


11 posted on 03/11/2013 8:35:45 PM PDT by DoctorBulldog (Obama sucks. End of story.)
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To: MacMattico

You waited until your kid was in high school to become aware that the public school is substandard?


12 posted on 03/11/2013 8:36:25 PM PDT by lurk
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To: MacMattico

Catholic schools have taken federal funds and are now part of the problem. Colleges that seek out home schooled students, and there are lots of them , look at portfolios and exams that are not SAT or PSAT as those assessments are now aligned to the common core. True homeschooled students vs public cyber schooled students are in demand. Note to parents who choose to home school.. choose your curriculum CAREFULLY.


13 posted on 03/11/2013 8:39:02 PM PDT by codder too
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To: MacMattico

What the heck are teachers teaching?

This may answer your question:

http://www.city-journal.org/html/16_3_ed_school.html


14 posted on 03/11/2013 8:39:39 PM PDT by Slyfox (Arbitrary power is most easily established on the ruins of liberty abused to licentiousness -G Wash.)
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To: MacMattico

My wife is ready to take our first grader out - maybe tomorrow. In SC the support system for homeschooling is numbingly good. My wife posted a query on Facebook and received dozens of replies from local homeschool families within a couple hours.


15 posted on 03/11/2013 8:42:07 PM PDT by bolobaby
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To: DoctorBulldog; wintertime; metmom

Erratum: “They more experiened” should be “They ARE more experienced”

Using my daughter’s laptop and my fingers are too big to touch type on it, so I have to hunt and peck. Find myself thinking I’ve already typed something when I haven’t. My brain works too fast for hunting and pecking.

Cheers


16 posted on 03/11/2013 8:42:09 PM PDT by DoctorBulldog (Obama sucks. End of story.)
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To: rbbeachkid

We homeschooled K-3, 5-12 (but graduated in 10th). I would do it again in a heartbeat.


17 posted on 03/11/2013 8:42:46 PM PDT by bboop (does not suffer fools gladly)
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To: MacMattico

My wife and I are Homeschooling our four children. What we can’t teach our children, they learn at a Co-Op where we are members. My wife has her degree in teaching. She has taught at both Christian and Public School. She said there was no way she would want our children to be schooled in a private school. Don’t fall into the “Socialization” argument. Let’s see, socialization by the public school or socialization by you. You won’t have to worry about drugs, sex ed, or using God in your studies if you decide to do so. Shootings also occur less at a Home School!


18 posted on 03/11/2013 8:42:52 PM PDT by drinktheobamakoolaid (If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves. Abraham Lincoln)
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To: MacMattico
I sent you a pm, but will comment a bit more here.

Oh, and I help run a business with my husband, but I can basically work when I want to. 20-25/hrs a week and I can get my work done. Is there enough time?

Absolutely. In 5 hours a day you can run rings around the ps education. If you have a responsible self-teacher, you may be able to do so in almost none.

And does being parent/ teacher 24/7 cause parent/teen tension?

Totally depends on the parent and the student.

19 posted on 03/11/2013 8:45:56 PM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: OKRA2012

I read it just fine, but I’m no lackwit.


20 posted on 03/11/2013 8:48:13 PM PDT by TightyRighty (I enjoy well-mannered frivolity.)
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To: MacMattico

my niece home schooled thru HS. She was pretty good to try to stay with her schedule - though I know she and her mom had some tense moments about it at times. My niece did well over all and is in christian college now. She used Abeka home school. I don’t know much about it, but I’m thrilled my sister was open to allowing her to home school. I wish she would do it for her boys. It is scary how schooling has changed so much, but when I think back to my catholic grade schooling in 70’s we were even taught some twisted history and science ideas and the start of prioritizing other cultures over our own national heritage.


21 posted on 03/11/2013 8:53:43 PM PDT by freeB
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To: TightyRighty

Just ignore newbie OKRA2012, aka “the sardonic Paragraph Nazi.”

Cheers


22 posted on 03/11/2013 9:08:33 PM PDT by DoctorBulldog (Obama sucks. End of story.)
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To: TightyRighty

Thank you!


23 posted on 03/11/2013 9:09:02 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico; All

Thanks all for some great replies! I think I should also add that I’m in NY state and they say they require every student to have a Regents diploma. Can you get around this requirement homeschooling? Do you still have to take the Regents exams to be accepted as a HS graduate? NY can be so screwed up at times...


24 posted on 03/11/2013 9:15:01 PM PDT by MacMattico
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To: MacMattico
I homeschooled for seven years. I used Calvert for my overall curricula and added Saxon math. We started at 9:00 and worked through to about 2:00.

I also had my kids in private and parochial schools. They were all good experiences. The one thing I was adamant about was that I did not want my children taught contrary to my moral outlook. And I worked hard to achieve that.

As far as socialization is concerned - if your kids have contact with others they are being socialized. Music lessons, group sports, swim lessons, scouting, I even took my boys on field trips like the one time we attended a political outdoor event during the day and got our picture made with Chuck Norris. The boys still talk about that one.

If you can find a good affordable private of parochial school that would be good. If not talk to homeschoolers in your area and read books about it.

25 posted on 03/11/2013 9:24:33 PM PDT by Slyfox (Arbitrary power is most easily established on the ruins of liberty abused to licentiousness -G Wash.)
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To: MacMattico

Quality music lessons can be had very inexpensively - if it is actually music that you want your child to study, practice and learn. If one becomes at least semi-accomplished at music, it can be a edifying hobby or simply make listening to good music a wonderful enjoyment.

I went to public school and wasted far too many hours being in every band there was. I was quite proficient, one of the best in the school, but spent too much time on it and not enough studying the real subjects. And my career has had nothing to do with music. In exchange for a few simple “life lessons” that I would have acquired in other fields of study, I trashed my academic career. By my last year, no one else was really serious about preparing for our “big trip”, I was trying to work my part-time job to earn needed money, so I quit. Everyone wanted the “fun” trip, the musicianship was in the toilet by that point.

Athletic activity can be easily done without the school, if you just spend some time searching the internet. Same advice, IMHO, don’t go crazy with sports, it’s just about getting some exercise, and those same simple life lessons, i.e., learning to compete fairly, physically demanding work dedicated to preparing and improving, etc.

The lure that pulls parents in is the “organized” part of sports and music - the awards, the trips, the uniforms, the “social” aspect. It’s all about dreams, fantasies, etc. That actually detracts from what a child’s education is supposed to be about, which is preparation for life. IMHO, children need to be taught to think about and plan for their family life, not some dreams (actually lies) that new world order tells them they will find happiness in.

I rarely have heard of a parent being a “taskmaster” when it comes to music - but that’s how music was always historically taught to children. And that teaching discipline gave us all the great classical composers and performers.

And most children today have not a clue about music - that is why so many like the junk propaganda that passes for music today.


26 posted on 03/11/2013 9:43:22 PM PDT by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves)
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To: MacMattico

We took the plunge and did it about 10 years ago. Best decision I could EVER make in my life. You will not regret it. The fist few weeks were scary, but then you realize that nobody loves your children more than you do, and the rest falls into place shortly after that.

Both my kids received full scholarships to college. Universities LOVE homeschooled kids these days.


27 posted on 03/11/2013 10:50:19 PM PDT by ImaGraftedBranch (...By reading this, you've collapsed my wave function. Thanks.)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas; MacMattico

I just wanted to ditto what St_Thomas here said. I will add that IMHO, a *good* high school would be a viable alternative if you can find one that you can afford in your area ... but ya know, good luck with that.

If you are seriously interested in homeschooling, do some googling and see if there is a homeschool association in your area. For instance, there are two in my area (Sonoma County, CA), a secular homeschooling group (SCHN, of which we are members) and then a more religiously oriented group as well. Local homeschool groups can point you toward resources in your area (for example, perhaps a charter school that will work with you in homeschooling your child — we have a lot of those here). They can also be invaluable in providing socialization, since many local homeschool associations have clubs & groups that meet weekly, organize fieldtrips, etc. *My* kids would be very lonely without all the homeschooling friends we have now! :)

Best of luck with whatever you decide, and bless you for watching out for your girl!


28 posted on 03/11/2013 11:54:21 PM PDT by Hetty_Fauxvert (FUBO, and the useful idiots you rode in on!)
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To: MacMattico

P.S. In particular, check out hslda.org, and their page on New York homeschooling organizations: http://www.hslda.org/orgs/?State=NY


29 posted on 03/11/2013 11:59:57 PM PDT by Hetty_Fauxvert (FUBO, and the useful idiots you rode in on!)
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To: rbbeachkid

congrats
but who ever thought that gov could do anything competently??
All you need to do is stand in line at the dmv for ten minutes to see the wisdom and efficiency.
democrats baffle me.


30 posted on 03/12/2013 12:05:13 AM PDT by genghis
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To: Jeff Winston

Takes about 40 hours of instruction to cover a course. Say 10 courses over a typical school year, you could finish in 20 weeks with 20 hours a week instruction.


31 posted on 03/12/2013 12:20:51 AM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas is a state of mind - Steinbeck)
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To: lurk
I was thinking the same thing. We home schooled our daughter from 2nd to 12th and never regretted a day. Waiting till she is in HS though, could cause a problem with the child, not the teaching. The child will resent not being in school with friends and activities at this late date. My daughter had her own friends and activities as she went along. To force them out now might be very bad between parent and child. A friend of ours pulled their daughter out of school and asked if she could school with our daughter and we said yes. Apparently she was pulled from school as punishment for her daughter, not to get a better education. The daughter rebelled and made so many problems, the mom finally put her back in school.

BTW, The girl was an honor student and couldn't pass the same home school courses my daughter was taking. My daughter was far more advanced than she was and when they graduated, my daughter and her went to the same college and were roomies. She dropped out in 1 year and was pregnant in 2. My daughter graduated with a Bachelor degree in Poly Sci and a minor in Psychology.

It sounds to me this parent is just mad at the school and it would be a huge decision to take the child out of HS now. If the child was for it and not just talked into it, it might work. Home school kids learn to be self starters. If either the parent or the child think home school is easy peasy and doesn't need to be finished, they will fail and drop out. It is a MAJOR undertaking, but IMO, anybody can do it if they want it bad enough.

BTW, we used ABEKA and Saxxon math and loved it.

32 posted on 03/12/2013 2:43:22 AM PDT by chuckles
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To: chuckles

—— Home school kids learn to be self starters. -——

I remember being bored during school vacation weeks. When my girls hear about kids that are bored during vacation, they’re mystified. “There are so many things to do!”

But this is one of the great lessons of schooling that isn’t written on the chalkboard. Wait for someone to tell you what to do.

I used to tell my buddy, school throws you, bound and gagged, onto the street of life.


33 posted on 03/12/2013 4:30:11 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: MacMattico

Your daughter missed school. You helped her study the material she missed. She got 100 on the test.

What is your complaint?


34 posted on 03/12/2013 5:31:53 AM PDT by SoothingDave
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To: MacMattico

I graduated from home as did my wife. My siblings were also homeschooled. Of those 5 people all went to college and collectively got 5 bachelors degrees two masters and a doctorate. Of that group there is a veterinarian and four engineers and a fighter pilot. Yeah homeschooling can work and yeah transcripts for college are not hard. These days any college admissions officer can tell you homeschoolers are sought after because they are known to be good students.

What you did with your girl WAS homeschooling. And in no time at all you did a better job teaching her than the ‘real’ teacher did for anyone else in that class. It is just as simple as that. It does not even take that long; far less time than ‘normal’ schools. In highschool, if your kid in actually interested in learning, most of the study can be self directed.

Lazy and off track? Nah, a reasonable fear but educating is pretty forgiving. You make a plan and if you get behind you know how much to catch up. There are lot of resources out there to make getting up to speed and doing some planning easy.

There are other options for sports and music. Sometimes you can even still do those at the public school. Otherwise there are also teams and programs that are not school affiliated. There are also community youth orchestras, and private music lessons... lots of options out there.

And socialization... that is over rated. BIG time. Prior to being homeschooled my older sister was in highschool and wanted nothing better than to be a cheerleader. Within a year of coming home she wanted to be a pilot. She did a stint as a marine jet pilot before settling down with another marine to home school her own kids.


35 posted on 03/12/2013 6:14:27 AM PDT by TalonDJ
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To: MacMattico
And does being parent/ teacher 24/7 cause parent/teen tension?

In theory it can. In my experience it leads to a closer more rewarding parent child relationship.
36 posted on 03/12/2013 6:19:23 AM PDT by TalonDJ
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To: TalonDJ

-— . In my experience it leads to a closer more rewarding parent child relationship. -—

Ditto. One of the best, unexpected benefits for us.


37 posted on 03/12/2013 6:23:46 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: MacMattico

If you think well of Hillsdale College, they have a K-12 Curriculum available on their website free of charge.
DonnaYoung.org is free and the best site for record keeping resources. Learner.org has high school/college level courses, some of which are completely self-contained.
If you live in California I can give you more advice, since there are some state-specific rules.


38 posted on 03/12/2013 8:21:21 AM PDT by Excellence (9/11 was an act of faith.)
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To: MacMattico

Also, some community colleges will allow high school students to be concurrently enrolled. One semester of college equals a year of high school on the transcript, and also counts (in most cases) toward an associates and, possibly, transfer to four-year college.


39 posted on 03/12/2013 8:27:29 AM PDT by Excellence (9/11 was an act of faith.)
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To: St_Thomas_Aquinas
Remember that your job is to raise saints, not college students.

This. And there has to be time in a day to be able to do this. Public school children are so often frentically over-scheduled that there is no opportunity to listen to the small still voice.

We did homeschool our three. The youngest will graduate this May, and for her, especially, I am so glad we did. She has such a great heart for God- she prays every day for the persecuted church, reads the Bible daily, and has a very deep wisdom and compassion, far beyond her years. Her friends all come to her for prayer and advice. Her example has made all of us better people.

We did not put that connection there- God did- but we did facilitate the time and the space which it needed to emerge. It was worth every sacrifice that we made.

40 posted on 03/12/2013 8:40:49 AM PDT by Red Boots
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To: Red Boots
We did not put that connection there- God did- but we did facilitate the time and the space which it needed to emerge. It was worth every sacrifice that we made.

Wonderful testimony. And very true.

I can remember occasions in my teens where God tried to talk to me, but I was feeling like Charlie Brown when a line drive got hit back to the mound. I was in a perpetual state of confusion. I spent my 20s sorting things out. I had a lot of time on my hands since my parents died at an early age. I see it as a grace now, although it was a very painful process.

I didn't want my kids to have to go through that. And of course I wanted them to learn their faith.

41 posted on 03/12/2013 8:46:16 AM PDT by St_Thomas_Aquinas
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To: MacMattico

You should “Ask Laurie”:

http://homeschoolnyc.com/ask-laurie.html

She’s based in New York and knows all about that.

Cheers!


42 posted on 03/12/2013 9:38:20 AM PDT by DoctorBulldog (Obama sucks. End of story.)
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To: MacMattico; Tired of Taxes; JenB

Busy day today but I’ll ping out the homeschool lists this evening unless someone beats me to it.

Maybe ToT or JenB could grab this one for both lists......?


43 posted on 03/12/2013 10:57:05 AM PDT by metmom (For freedom Christ has set us free; stand firm therefore & do not submit again to a yoke of slavery)
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To: metmom; MacMattico; 2Jedismom; 6amgelsmama; AAABEST; aberaussie; AccountantMom; adopt4Christ; ...
Double-barreled ping to the ARTH and general Homeschool pinglists at once.

HOMESCHOOL PING

This ping list is for articles of interest to homeschoolers. Metmom holds both the Homeschool Ping List and the Another Reason to Homeschool Ping List. Please freepmail metmom to let her know if you would like to be added or removed from either list, or both.

The keyword for the FREE REPUBLIC HOMESCHOOLERS’ FORUM is frhf.

44 posted on 03/12/2013 11:23:07 AM PDT by JenB
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To: OKRA2012

HTML classes aren’t covered or necessary unless the student shows an active interest... :)


45 posted on 03/12/2013 11:25:46 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: MacMattico

Homeschooling, with someone that is first educated on being a self-directed learner,
should only take a few (2-4) hours per day.

You can do it.

I would think you would be able to develop a STRONGER relationship with your teen, especially when you remove the strong peer influence to “be cool”. Parents, by definition, aren’t “cool”, because cool is defined as being in just the proper state of rebellion to tradition and society.


46 posted on 03/12/2013 11:27:58 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: MacMattico

Curriculum choice is the most ubiquitous, and least important question having to do with homeschooling.

Don’t sweat it. Go to a homeschool conference this spring.


47 posted on 03/12/2013 11:28:58 AM PDT by MrB (The difference between a Humanist and a Satanist - the latter admits whom he's working for)
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To: MacMattico

Don’t waste your time on Catholic school. See how many communtiy college courses she can take after taking and passing the Accuplacer. That and homeschool courses can get her through. Use a place like Home Education and Family Services to help you build a transcript. I have sent two to college, one to trades school and another will gradutate in a couple of years.


48 posted on 03/12/2013 2:48:52 PM PDT by Chickensoup (200 million unarmed people killed in the 20th century by Leftist Totalitarian Fascists)
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To: MacMattico
Is there enough time?

Yes. At that age, your kid will be able to pretty much do the work solo. You interject when there are issues or questions as well as quizzing to ensure the work is getting done as it should.

And does being parent/ teacher 24/7 cause parent/teen tension?

Only you can answer that. How much/little do you like your kid?

49 posted on 03/12/2013 3:42:51 PM PDT by Future Snake Eater (CrossFit.com)
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To: MacMattico

The wonder of homeschooling is that you get to choose curriculum. You get to tailor it to your child and their individual needs. I can tell you about specific classes, but there was no packaged whole system.

Message me and I can walk you through what we did.


50 posted on 03/12/2013 4:19:38 PM PDT by rbbeachkid (Get out of its way and small business can fix the economy.)
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