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Plague of the overweight riders who are too heavy for their horses
Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | March 24, 2013 | Emine Sinmaz

Posted on 03/25/2013 1:37:01 PM PDT by DogByte6RER

 photo KGrHqVqUE88fkJvPiBPhdNUV6Vw60_57_zps16d0ef08.jpg

Plague of the overweight riders who are too heavy for their horses

• Only one in 20 riders are within the optimum weight for their horse

• A heavy load can mean back pain, lameness and bad behaviour in horses

• Vet guidelines advise that riders weigh less than 10 per cent of their mount

• Weighing more than 15 per cent of horse's weight poses health risks

• Research is published in the Journal of Veterinary Behaviour

Horses are the latest victims of the obesity crisis as they take the burden of their overweight riders, experts have warned.

A study found a third of recreational riders were too obese for their mounts, leaving the animals at risk of health problems such as back pain and lameness.

They can also develop behavioural problems, such as bucking, rearing and problems following commands.

Hayley Randle, one of the scientists behind the research, said: ‘People tend to think horses are such big animals they must be okay, and not to take notice of the weight issue of riders. But the health impact on the horse can be quite extreme, quite quickly.’

Published in the Journal of Veterinary Behaviour, the study assessed 152 horses and their adult riders from stables across Devon and Cornwall.

Guidelines set by vets state that riders should weigh less than 10 per cent of the weight of their horse. But researchers from Duchy College in Cornwall found that just 5 per cent of the riders passed the test.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine; Outdoors; Pets/Animals; Science
KEYWORDS: beastofburden; equestrian; fat; heavyload; horse; horsebackriding; horses; obesity; overload; overweight; ponies; pony
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fat horse rider photo: REALLY fat horse and Rider! fatpersonandhorse.jpg Hmmmmmm ... other than going on a diet, another solution to this problem; get a FATTER horse! (heh)
1 posted on 03/25/2013 1:37:01 PM PDT by DogByte6RER
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To: DogByte6RER
There's always this option:


2 posted on 03/25/2013 1:38:46 PM PDT by dirtboy
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To: DogByte6RER

I’m 5’ 10” and sit at a beefy 258. I wouldn’t even think of riding a horse smaller than a Clydesdale. A Percheron would probably be better.


3 posted on 03/25/2013 1:42:21 PM PDT by Dead Corpse (I will not comply.)
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To: DogByte6RER

I charge plagiarism. Other than a few of the comparative percentages, I think I saw this same report about British sex. :-)


4 posted on 03/25/2013 1:42:48 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (Choose one: the yellow and black flag of the Tea Party or the white flag of the Republican Party.)
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To: DogByte6RER

5 posted on 03/25/2013 1:43:46 PM PDT by Daffynition (The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted. — D.H.)
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To: DogByte6RER
Heavy horses
6 posted on 03/25/2013 1:44:02 PM PDT by Berlin_Freeper (Paul Ryan 2016)
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To: DogByte6RER
the study assessed 152 horses and their adult riders from stables across Devon and Cornwall.

Oooh, what a big, random sample! Let's generalize this over the entire population of horse owners/riders, worldwide!!!

7 posted on 03/25/2013 1:44:20 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Stand in the corner and scream with me!)
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To: Dead Corpse

What did John Wayne ride in all those western movies? He was a big man.


8 posted on 03/25/2013 1:45:01 PM PDT by Oberon (Big Brutha Be Watchin'.)
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To: Daffynition

Wasn’t that the horses Moochelle was riding


9 posted on 03/25/2013 1:45:36 PM PDT by Smittie (Just like an alien, I'm a stranger in a strange land)
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To: DogByte6RER

Plague of over weight government!


10 posted on 03/25/2013 1:48:47 PM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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arcade horse photo: Horse Riding @ Arcade horseridingarcade.gif These kids are already way out of the proper weight standard ratios to their horses ... I expect their horses will have short lives.
11 posted on 03/25/2013 1:51:50 PM PDT by DogByte6RER ("Loose lips sink ships")
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To: Oberon

He was certainly tall... 6’2” or 6’4” depending on your google-fu. Ex-football player... Dunno... They never really mention his weight. During most of his cowboy roles, he was still fairly lean. Probably around the 210-220 range would be my guess.

I’m a bunch shorter but a full sack of potatoes heavier.


12 posted on 03/25/2013 1:51:56 PM PDT by Dead Corpse (I will not comply.)
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To: DogByte6RER
This is not anything new.

Not a good copy - but the original caption was: "The Body Beautiful: What Three Months' Riding Can Do"

from Thelwell Country

A 10 percent rule I think is silly. Cobs and ponies can carry more weight, as my instructor says "they're like ants". I have very short legs and can ride a pretty short pony, they don't seem to mind my weight. Normally I ride big TBs and warmbloods.

Also, there are too many variables - saddle, pads, and riding ability. A well balanced but heavier rider is much easier for a horse to carry than a lighter weight rider who is flopping all over the place. If a horse is sound and not in distress, I don't see the problem.

I rode my 16.1 hh TB mare for 13 years before retiring her at age 27.

13 posted on 03/25/2013 1:53:10 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ministrix of ye Chasse, TTGS Ladies' Auxiliary (recess appointment))
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To: Oberon; Dead Corpse

John Wayne was a big man, and they chose larger horses for him to ride, so that he didn’t look like a giant onscreen.

However, even is his later years when he wasn’t as fit, he didn’t weigh as much as a lot of women in my local Walmart. He put on heft in the belly, but the rest of his frame was wasting from the cancers.


14 posted on 03/25/2013 1:53:20 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Stand in the corner and scream with me!)
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To: Dead Corpse

We have a Percheron/Morgan cross. She took many a huntsman who had not missed many meals over fences in the hunt field. She’s retired now, but still sound as a dollar.


15 posted on 03/25/2013 1:54:09 PM PDT by centurion316
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To: DogByte6RER

The American quarter horse and the Tennessee walking horse, among others, average about 1,000 to 1,200 pounds. That means no one who weighs more than 100 to 120 pounds should ride them. Can that be right?


16 posted on 03/25/2013 1:54:28 PM PDT by GrootheWanderer
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To: GrootheWanderer

How about a Clydesdale?


17 posted on 03/25/2013 1:55:39 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (I’m not a Republican, I’m a conservative! Pubbies haven't been conservative since before T.R.)
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To: Tax-chick

If the sample were truly random, that sample size is good enough to give a margin of error of only +/- 8% at a 95% confidence level. That is, the sample matches the population of the area the samples were drawn from, within +/- 8% 19 times out of 20. You’re quite right in saying that the results cannot be generalized beyond that area — and certainly not worldwide.

Of course, there could be a great many other problems with the methodology. However, the results are credible, because we know that the general population is getting bigger faster than the average horse.


18 posted on 03/25/2013 1:57:27 PM PDT by USFRIENDINVICTORIA
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To: DogByte6RER

Wow, I guess cowboys were smaller than I thought, or these experts are idiots.


19 posted on 03/25/2013 1:58:07 PM PDT by Born to Conserve
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To: DogByte6RER

“Wilbur! Get off my back!” Mr. Ed


20 posted on 03/25/2013 1:58:46 PM PDT by tumblindice (America's founding fathers: All armed conservatives.)
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To: DogByte6RER

How does one determine the proper size horse for him/herself? Here is a formula with example:

Add up the total weight of the horse, rider, and tack. Our example: Horse + rider + tack= 1188 pounds

Measure the circumference of the cannon bone midway between the knee and fetlock. Our example: 7.5 inches

Divide the total weight by the circumference.
Our example: 1188 / 7.5 = 158.4

Divide the result by two. Our example: 158.4 / 2 = 79.2

Values below 75 are great! Values from 75-80 are acceptable. Values over 80 indicate weaker legs and a need to train carefully, especially downhill. At this level a rider needs a horse with more substance.

* Reference: The Heavier Riders’ Guide by Beverly Whittington and Rhonda Hart-Poe


21 posted on 03/25/2013 1:59:44 PM PDT by shove_it (Long ago Huxley, Orwell and Rand warned us about 0banana's USA.)
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To: Oberon
Come see a fat old man sometime.
22 posted on 03/25/2013 2:00:56 PM PDT by vbmoneyspender
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To: GrootheWanderer

It doesn’t seem like that should be right. Something is out of whack in this story. I posted this thread (hopefully) in a tongue-in-cheek manner ... it would not surprise me if this study was put out for some sort of political agenda; i.e., PETA type activism or by English nanny-staters searching for another snack or beverage to ban.


23 posted on 03/25/2013 2:02:03 PM PDT by DogByte6RER ("Loose lips sink ships")
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To: Tax-chick

True Grit (1969)
[last lines]
Mattie Ross: Trust you to buy another tall horse.
Rooster Cogburn: Yeah. He’s not as game as Beau, but Stonehill says he can jump a four rail fence.
Mattie Ross: You are too old and fat to be jumping horses.
Rooster Cogburn: Well, come see a fat old man some time!


24 posted on 03/25/2013 2:06:47 PM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Tax-chick

My first thought was “What would Hoss Cartwright think about this?”


25 posted on 03/25/2013 2:07:07 PM PDT by Calvin Locke
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To: Born to Conserve

Yes, they were.

The US Army’s mounted soldier had a maximum weight of something like 140 pounds in the 1870’s.

The Pony Express riders were thin, wiry young boys - perhaps less than 130 lbs in order to get the maximum speed and distance out of their mounts.


26 posted on 03/25/2013 2:15:08 PM PDT by NVDave
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To: Dead Corpse
This isn't me, but

in 1977 my friend showed me what to do and I did this with a pair of Gentle Giants, Bill and Bob for an afternoon.

This city boy had never been that up close to a horse in his life and I tell ya ... THAT was one of the mileposts of my life.

Percherons are magnificent beasts.

27 posted on 03/25/2013 2:21:35 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: Calvin Locke

Hoss always had larger horses. Horse profiles are somewhere on the Bonanza website.


28 posted on 03/25/2013 2:22:47 PM PDT by laplata
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To: NVDave
Interesting factoid I picked up some years ago ... lumberjacks back in the axe and 2 man saw days were no heavier than about 130.

Little wiry scrappy suckers.

29 posted on 03/25/2013 2:24:16 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: centurion316

I was looking for someone to bring up Percherons.

Hoof prints as big as a dinner plate.


30 posted on 03/25/2013 2:24:27 PM PDT by Rebelbase (1929-1950's, 20+years for full recovery. How long this time?)
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To: knarf

That looks like fun, but not having to do 100 acres of it! I did some reading about the history of John Deere. It was his plow design invention that caused the population of Kansas to nearly double within 10 years back in the day.

31 posted on 03/25/2013 2:29:22 PM PDT by Rebelbase (1929-1950's, 20+years for full recovery. How long this time?)
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To: DogByte6RER
With the proper horse (bigger is not necessarily better), an overweight rider can still ride if the saddle is properly chosen and fitted. Problem is, most folks don't bother.

It's all about the "tree," for those who know their saddle nomenclature.

32 posted on 03/25/2013 2:29:23 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: DogByte6RER

People that I know that work around livestock are big men’s men. Ain’t no little wirey girly boys hangin around my place. But they are all fit. The amount of work involved in being a farmhand or rancher will not allow one to become fat. I did it for years and I was in the best shape of my life when I was tending to 2000 head of cattle.
I can’t say the same for people who ride recreationally, but people who do it for a living are inherently fit just because they work ALL DAY. Hard work... MAN’S WORK.


33 posted on 03/25/2013 2:29:27 PM PDT by envisio (Its on like Donkey Kong!!)
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To: DogByte6RER
James Arness of Gunsmoke fame was 6'7" tall and must have been 250 lbs. plus, so that was a good sized horse the studio put him on.
Clint Walker was another big man on horseback, but it didn't look weird - maybe a draft horse crossed with a regular one? I'm no expert on horses, by the way.
34 posted on 03/25/2013 2:35:54 PM PDT by dainbramaged (Joe McCarthy was right.)
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To: shove_it

How does one determine the proper size horse for him/herself? Here is a formula with example:

Add up the total weight of the horse, rider, and tack. Our example: Horse + rider + tack= 1188 pounds

Measure the circumference of the cannon bone midway between the knee and fetlock. Our example: 7.5 inches

Divide the total weight by the circumference.
Our example: 1188 / 7.5 = 158.4

Divide the result by two. Our example: 158.4 / 2 = 79.2

Values below 75 are great! Values from 75-80 are acceptable. Values over 80 indicate weaker legs and a need to train carefully, especially downhill. At this level a rider needs a horse with more substance.

* Reference: The Heavier Riders’ Guide by Beverly Whittington and Rhonda Hart-Poe


I have seen many TB’s with cannon bones like a deer and their legs lasted forever.

And I have seen many big boned TB’s and half breds with knots all over their legs, splints being the least of their problems.

So generalities are worthless.


35 posted on 03/25/2013 2:36:06 PM PDT by old curmudgeon
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To: Dead Corpse

Good for you. A big draft-cross sounds like the perfect animal for you.

Of course, rider’s balance and skill are important. Saddle fit is absolutely CRUCIAL with a heavier rider. The trouble is that if a rider really has a big posterior, the panels of the saddle have to extend pretty far back, which means the rider’s weight presses on the horse’s kidneys. This is not a joke.


36 posted on 03/25/2013 2:39:48 PM PDT by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: old curmudgeon
I have seen many TB’s with cannon bones like a deer and their legs lasted forever. And I have seen many big boned TB’s and half breds with knots all over their legs, splints being the least of their problems. So generalities are worthless.

We're not necessarily talking about damage to the legs, which anyway is more a question of tendon and ligament damage than bone damage. Most of the issue is back pain, or pain that's referred from the back to the shoulders and hindquarters. I don't think the height or weight of the horse are a good guide in any except the most general sense; conformation is essential in considering appropriate size. (Ponies, for example, are structurally stronger than horses and can carry a larger percent of their body weight without discomfort.)

37 posted on 03/25/2013 2:45:48 PM PDT by ottbmare (The OTTB Mare)
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To: shove_it

I would also point out that cutting and roping horses are typically barely more than pony size and typically carry some pretty big men.

Go to the RFD channel, 345 on DirecTV, and watch them work. Those horses work hard and when they are changing direction so abruptly they are putting a lot of strain on their legs.

Chamberlain stated that the ideal cavalry horse was 15.2 to 16H and that the larger horses did not stand up well in the cavalry.

Someone posted that the cavalryman of that day weighed an average of 140 lbs., but forgot to mention that saddle, weapons, blanket roll and personal supplies probably brought the total weight to more than 200 lbs.....a guess on my part as I really don’t know what their equipment weighed.


38 posted on 03/25/2013 2:52:36 PM PDT by old curmudgeon
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To: DogByte6RER

My wife and I went horseback riding on our honeymoon. The wrangler looked like he’d come from an old John Wayne movie. He gave me a mule to ride. I didn’t care. It was in the mountains. He must have thought I was a real green horn because he kept telling me how good that “horse” was. We had a nice ride and came back. He asked me how I liked my horse. I said he was OK, but he seemed to have big ears. He gave me a long look. “You’re not from back East, are you?” I told him some of my relatives raise mules. My wife and I still laugh about my honeymoon horse.


39 posted on 03/25/2013 2:52:42 PM PDT by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: ottbmare

Please note that the message to which I replied was devoted specifically to the size of the cannon vs the rider’s weight.

As for back pain, your own post settles that. As you said, little horses can usually carry a higher percentage of their weight.

Size does not matter. The individual horse and the saddle fit, pad selection and rider’s melding with the motion of the horse are much more important.


40 posted on 03/25/2013 3:00:34 PM PDT by old curmudgeon
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To: Rebelbase

America’s greatness because of our goodness (DeToqueville) was no less the result of our opportunity and freedom to act on our thoughts and invent and manufacture the neatest stuff on earth.


41 posted on 03/25/2013 3:04:54 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: blueunicorn6
He gave me a mule to ride.

Now this thread needs music! Mules are awesome, btw.

42 posted on 03/25/2013 3:10:20 PM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: knarf

Used to walk behind one like that plowing tobacco

when I was young,up one side of the row and back

down the other side.

Remember him passing methane every now and then.

Have to move over about 4 rows for a bit.


43 posted on 03/25/2013 3:12:31 PM PDT by Harold Shea (RVN `70 - `71)
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To: blueunicorn6

Mules and Mustangs (captured wild horses) are both pretty surefooted and are best for riding on mountain trails.


44 posted on 03/25/2013 3:21:24 PM PDT by Inyo-Mono (NRA)
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To: old curmudgeon; ottbmare

Thanks for your comments. Before today I knew absolutely nothing about the subject of this thread, so I did a little research and got some input from both of you. Now I know more than I did yesterday. That’s what I like about this forum and what keeps me coming back.

Cheers,
Otter


45 posted on 03/25/2013 4:31:56 PM PDT by shove_it (Long ago Huxley, Orwell and Rand warned us about 0banana's USA.)
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To: Smittie
I thought she wrecked a mechanical bull.


46 posted on 03/25/2013 4:41:17 PM PDT by Daffynition (The essential American soul is hard, isolate, stoic, and a killer. It has never yet melted. — D.H.)
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To: DogByte6RER

47 posted on 03/25/2013 4:55:08 PM PDT by Dysart ( Democracy is the road to socialism-- Karl Marx)
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To: knarf
"Percherons are magnificent beasts."

Amen! We had a team of half-brother Percherons in MN. Wonderful, intelligent, powerful animals! We called them "Da Boys" (the chickens were called "the girls"), and named them after our sons, Joe and Doug. Lovely, lovely giants.

48 posted on 03/25/2013 5:32:44 PM PDT by redhead (NO GROUND TO THE DEVIL! Use Weaponized Prayer)
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To: DogByte6RER

49 posted on 03/25/2013 5:41:50 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: redhead
As I said, I had never been behind a team before, but my friend trusted my (then) intelligence and ability to obey instruction and my youthful strength ... taught me what to do and (under his watchful eye) turned me loose.

To see those animals dig in and pull is a sense as powerful as being beside a lightning bolt.

OK .. maybe that's a little much but obviously, Those guys made an impression on me.

I had been up on the hillside with my friend at other times watching them skid logs out of the woods ... now THAT was power I had never witnessed before.

All you hoss folks (we Bostonians say hoss, not horse .. ) are blessed.

50 posted on 03/25/2013 5:43:12 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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