Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 14 APRIL 5, 2013
Free Republic | April 5, 2013 | greeneyes

Posted on 04/05/2013 12:36:13 PM PDT by greeneyes

The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you.

This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread ... there is no telling where it will go and that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: agriculture; food; gardening; hobby
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-124 next last
We are having a great spring day in Missouri. It's 64 dgrees and the low tonight will be a warm 49 degrees.

I have planted some spinach and dill. Cleaned out the old tomato stems and pulled weeds in another bed.

Have a great weekend. God Bless.

1 posted on 04/05/2013 12:36:13 PM PDT by greeneyes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: greeneyes; Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; ...

Pinging the List.


2 posted on 04/05/2013 12:39:11 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

I counted 26 trinidad moruga scorpion seedlings. 18 bhut jolokia seedlings and a bunch more habaneros, fatalis and assorted other superhots. I overplanted because they supposedly have low germination and because I have a track record with seedlings . ahem. We’ll see how many survive to make it into the garden.

Might try putting some tomatoes out Monday morning. And finish up my strawberry beds. I’ve got jicama seeds planted and warm. Next up is the cucurbits. I’m going to add luffa sponges this year.


3 posted on 04/05/2013 12:47:01 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

That’s about the temps here today. Earlier in the week, we had a horrific storm - heavy downpours, flooding, wind and hail. Totally destroyed the garden. I refuse to buy plants because 1) I can’t afford it and 2) I’m stubborn. So, it’ll be restarting all over again for the untold time. I’m this close to tears. Enough already!


4 posted on 04/05/2013 12:49:38 PM PDT by bgill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Black Agnes

We are sooo ready to start planting the new strawberry beds, but the companies haven’t sent the plants we ordered months ago.

This is probably a good thing, keeps us from pushing it and planting before we should. LOL.


5 posted on 04/05/2013 12:54:18 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: bgill

I am so sorry to hear about your misfortune. Best of luck going forward.


6 posted on 04/05/2013 12:55:39 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes
78° here in the Texas Hill Country. We had a pleasant surprise with 1¼" inch of rain a couple days ago. It may not seem like much, but for an area that has been drought stricken for a couple years, it was a deluge.
The plants in the hoophouse and the stonefruit trees sure loved it!

Here we have a mixed bed of cabbage and sweet pepper plants. Also a bit of catnip for our furry friends:

This shot shows the collards, onion, lettuce on the right; cabbage, a couple tomato plants, and more onion on the left. At the far end is the potato bed:

Yes, that is carpeting between the rows. A neighbor redid her floors with linoleum, and we scavenged the carpet as a weed blocker. We tried cedar mulch and row cloth last year, but the weeds would grow through it.

We're going to plant a lot of tomato and more okra this year. I'll post those pics when I get rid of the durned 'possum that keeps messing the beds.

7 posted on 04/05/2013 1:01:29 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Don't think for a minute that this excuse for a President has America's best interest in mind.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes
Everything big enough for the big garden went in on the first. Then we had 2 days of slow rain and got almost 2 inches. It worked out perfect. All the tobacco is out. All the tomatoes are out. Peppers are out. Of course the onions and potatoes are doing great, and they have been out for a while.

Next week, the corn, peanuts and sunflowers go out.

Pulled the cold frame to get it ready to store for the summer, and my herb/salad garden is really a herb/salad garden now and not a nursery under the cold frame.

I had to give away lettuce this morning because I can't use it all.

All in all, this will be a productive year if things keep going this well.

/johnny

8 posted on 04/05/2013 1:07:01 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: bgill
Ouch. Sorry for the loss. Prayers up.

/johnny

9 posted on 04/05/2013 1:07:41 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Sarajevo
Catnip loves this time of year. Both of my catz are sleeping off hangovers from my little present to them this morning. ;)

/johnny

10 posted on 04/05/2013 1:09:42 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Our crew actually wore the catnip plants out and we had to plant more. Amazing, since catnip is rather invasive. :)


11 posted on 04/05/2013 1:25:54 PM PDT by Sarajevo (Don't think for a minute that this excuse for a President has America's best interest in mind.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Sarajevo

I live here in suburban DFW and just starting again to grow a little garden. Back in the 70’s in NY I had a green thumb. Now they must be brown because I have lots of trouble growing plants and veggies. I need to be a student in your class there professor green leaves.


12 posted on 04/05/2013 1:38:28 PM PDT by tflabo (Truth or Tyranny)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

Greetings from Southern California! It’s overcast and about 80 degrees here at the moment. We are down 8” of rain this year and our rain window is closing — we get little to no rain between about April to November or December.

Roses are blooming nicely and the winter flowers are starting to dry up (pansies, Icelandic poppies, cyclamen). I’ll put out petunias this weekend so they’ll have an established root system before the heat and hot winds really set in.

Also blooming are foxgloves, honeysuckles, hibiscus and angel’s trumpets (I have yellow, orange, white, icy pink and a double white in my collection). Lemon trees are overloaded again, but not tangerine or orange. Wildflowers are also starting to bloom nicely in the area, including the beautiful California poppy and neon blue lupines. I will enjoy them while they last for the next month or two - before everything goes brown!!

Send some rain our way, please, we are dying here of dehydration!!


13 posted on 04/05/2013 1:54:37 PM PDT by Bon of Babble (I have seen the future and I'm going back to bed!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sarajevo

Glad to hear you got some rain. Thanks for the pics. Your garden is looking good.


14 posted on 04/05/2013 2:12:46 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

It sounds like great progress. Here’s hoping we see an end or at least a decrease to the drought this year, so the crops can live up to their potential.


15 posted on 04/05/2013 2:15:11 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Bon of Babble
Wish I had the power to send rain to various areas, but all I can do is pray-so prayers up for everyone that needs rain!

The only thing I have blooming is jonquils and hyacinths.

16 posted on 04/05/2013 2:18:24 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

I’ve decided to plant luffa sponges this year. I can’t seem to find any affordable bath cloths that aren’t Made in China. I already grow my own garlic and herbs for that reason.


17 posted on 04/05/2013 2:19:54 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

6-7 weeks to Last Frost...YAY! Protected bulbs & iris coming up; the rest won’t be far behind. Time to give them a shot of food, and maybe divide & reset some of them.

Finished cleaning the beds, re-fertilizing, and replanting the Everlasting Onions. Put about 600 back into the beds, and brought 500 in the house, which are in the process of drying. 1,000 down 5-7,000 to go! (Anybody need/want any? FReep Mail me.)

Some will go to the Battle Mountain Humane Society to plant; they mentioned to us last night at a benefit dinner they would like some. They want to start a small market garden for some badly needed income.

Today, I got 5 85’ rows of the Sugar Snap peas planted; about 2/3 to 3/4 of the seed. I’ll save the rest for a later planting, or in case I need to replant.

Also got the main garden cleaned up & tilled. Discovered a 4X20 patch of wheat I had forgotten I put in last Fall: it was the ‘extra’ seed from planting the main plot.

All 50 of the Egyptian onions I rescued from the landfill last year are up & looking good. I’ll probably have to move them to a more convenient location; they got stuck in where they are by Hobson’s choice in mid season.

Sometime between now & Monday evening, I’ll find out if I have some chicks; or have just been keeping 19 rotten eggs warm. ;-’) That is in addition to however many are under a broody hen. I don’t know how many are under her, as she is serious about her job; I have the scabs to prove it


18 posted on 04/05/2013 2:20:55 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

I still haven’t started my seeds. It’s been too cold and windy to work outside, and trying to move potting soil around in the kitchen might be a disaster. I did receive my canna bulbs, which are sitting in the garage until I either plant them in the ground, or in pots. We still have a danger of frost here until the end of May.


19 posted on 04/05/2013 2:22:24 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Sarajevo

Nice looking soil, and amazing workmanship in those raised beds!


20 posted on 04/05/2013 2:24:02 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ApplegateRanch

Holy cow. I’m impressed! We have some very accomplished gardeners here.


21 posted on 04/05/2013 2:27:22 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper; Sarajevo

Ours got a goodly dose from what we dried for them last Fall. Shameful parenting, drugging the kids, then laughing at their antics.

Meanwhile, I’ve seen the first shoots from the main catnip clumps starting to leaf out. Had to get rid of some last year, and probably will again this year to keep that invasiveness under control.

Have another dish of cat-grass for them, too. One loves it more than fresh liver; the other can take it or leave it: take it, if the one is chewing it; or leave it if the other one isn’t around to dominate.


22 posted on 04/05/2013 2:30:51 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

Thanks as always for this thread, greeneyes.


23 posted on 04/05/2013 2:39:17 PM PDT by fidelis (Zonie and USAF Cold Warrior)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: JRandomFreeper

Just had a friend call to ask if I still had a garden because hers had been destroyed, too. Said on top of everything, the dogs had had a mud wrestling party in it so told her husband there’d better be t-posts and an electric fence up by the time she gets back home Sunday. She didn’t get the flooding or hail but her tomatoes, cukes and other plants are gone. Guess there will be several of us starting over.

Have to fix the flower bed - again - too. The river of rain washed the edging blocks out. You can tell where the water was from the debris left. Hubby was out sweeping it back because it was this close to coming in the front door and did get into the garage. I’m up for one more try but after that, Mother Nature wins. Truth be told, she has already won because the heat will be here before things get growing again.


24 posted on 04/05/2013 2:42:59 PM PDT by bgill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: ApplegateRanch
I have a lot of what I call frue-frue plants (those that can't be eaten) left over on the property from the previous owner (50 years ago, because my family has owned the property that long) that I remember as a kid.

I have cleaned up some around the house and they are starting to come out and take over in the front beds and around the house.

I have no idea what they are, but my neighbor across the street is into the flowers etc... and she says they are pretty.

Meh... I can't eat 'em, so I don't care too much.

/johnny

25 posted on 04/05/2013 2:45:36 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: bgill
We missed the hail here on Tues and Wed near DFW, and just got a slow, steady rain.

Of course, there's plenty of opportunity in the next few months. I've got plastic and supports I can use if I get out there in time, but mother nature can be a real.... witch.

/johnny

26 posted on 04/05/2013 2:50:23 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes; fanfan

We’re going to attempt the Three Sisters method of raising corn, beans and squash this year. We bought and started the seeds before we thought of doing that, so the squash might not be satisfactory in terms of shading the ground and conserving moisture. We have no idea what we’re doing.


27 posted on 04/05/2013 3:05:30 PM PDT by Silentgypsy (I must b e all here, because everyone keeps telling me I'm not all there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: bgill

I’m sorry about your garden. :(


28 posted on 04/05/2013 3:14:42 PM PDT by Silentgypsy (I must b e all here, because everyone keeps telling me I'm not all there.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes; All
Spring showers here on the far north coast of California but we're making slow progress on the main garden cleanup. I've been tending to gardens since 1938 when I remember watering my Mother's door side herbs and Walking Onions when all we had was a shallow well with a hand pump and you carried the water in a galvanized or wooden bucket. My Dad had a large summer garden but it was flood irrigated with ditch water after the plants got started. Lady Bender is a couple of years younger and works circles around me. I'll post some photos later but I want to share this 90 minute video on mulching with wood chips. Most of you more established gardeners may find this redundant but you may pick up one new tip or two plus the main gardener is well versed in the Bible...

Back to Eden...

29 posted on 04/05/2013 3:18:56 PM PDT by tubebender (Evening news is where they begin with "Good Evening," and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

The cold and rainy weather has finally ended here in the SW Va corner. March’s elec bill is twice last years. Garden should finally dry out enough to till next week.

Got free Hazelnut, American Plum, and Chinquapin saplings at the County extension service Weds. The Red Mulberry was all gone when we got there just an hour after they started.
Got some Hazelnut from them 3 years ago and hope these are a different variety- as it turns out Hazelnut types won’t polinate themselves or other trees of the same variety!.Doesn;t make sense that a plant would survive with their weird way of pollinating: first they make the male pollen and later they grow the female flowers- after their pollen is gone.
So they all depend on different varieties- which produce pollen at different times- for pollination.That’s taking cross-pollination too far IMHO.

Chinquapin was mostly wiped out here by the Chestnut blight so I’m looking forward to having some for my mother who loved the nuts as a kid.


30 posted on 04/05/2013 3:32:23 PM PDT by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Black Agnes

I applaud your effort. I have considered growning flax and weaving it into fabric, but decided to leave that skill to others.

Looking for USA made products has saved me money. I look at the made in China and put it back. I look at the made in USA and can’t afford it, so I put in down too.LOL


31 posted on 04/05/2013 3:36:01 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: ApplegateRanch

After reading all that you have done, I need to go lay down and rest.LOL

You have a lot going on.


32 posted on 04/05/2013 3:45:38 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: trisham

Yes, we have frost troubles too off and on. I am just too lazy to take a chance on needing to replant. So I just limit planting to lettuce and spinach and cover with a row cover till better weather is certain.


33 posted on 04/05/2013 3:47:23 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: fidelis

You are welcome.


34 posted on 04/05/2013 3:47:41 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Silentgypsy

It should be ok. Sometimes, I even plant melons instead of squash.LOL


35 posted on 04/05/2013 3:48:32 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

That’s a wise decision. I’m hoping that we have seen the last of snow here in Massachusetts, but a late frost is always a threat.


36 posted on 04/05/2013 3:51:26 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: tubebender

http://www.backtoedenfilm.com/

The link didn’t work for me, but I did a search and found this-I think it’s the same. So here’s another to try. Thanks for the information.


37 posted on 04/05/2013 3:54:07 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: mrsmith

We have walnuts and butternuts, but have been trying to get some almond, english walnuts, and hazelnuts going. So far they don’t make it through the season.


38 posted on 04/05/2013 3:56:27 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: bgill
“Earlier in the week, we had a horrific storm - heavy downpours, flooding, wind and hail.”

You must live south of me - I'm in Conroe. I was supposed to get that high destructive wind and the hail, had warnings it was coming, but I only got the rain. Houston and points south did get it, so maybe you are in that area.

I am so sorry about your garden. In terms of an emergency, one has to have food put away in case they lose their garden to weather. Anything here that was planted in 2011, died - that was the worst I have ever been through with those many days, over and over, of 105-107. It broiled my climbing roses, killed them all. A lot of money went into those roses and now that back white wall is bare. I haven't gotten out there and cut down all those thorny bushes and vines. My son will visit in May, so he can do it.

There is nothing to say that will make your garden come back. I grieved over all those dead roses so I know how you feel about your garden.

I am so not good at this gardening stuff. I should have moved the pots with tomatoes and put them under the roofed deck out there and I didn't even think to move them. If I had gotten the hail they said I was going to get, they would have been destroyed. The next time I have bad weather coming, I will think of you and move those pots under the roof.

39 posted on 04/05/2013 4:14:20 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: trisham

Well, like I said it’s borne more of what some may call laziness rather than wisdom. One of my distant relatives used to call it dropsey and heart trouble.

She said, “I drops down, and I don’t have the heart to get back up!”LOL


40 posted on 04/05/2013 4:15:09 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

Yes...That’s the one. This is the second link I have posted that is DOA. The other was on the Nascar thread.


41 posted on 04/05/2013 4:16:26 PM PDT by tubebender (Evening news is where they begin with "Good Evening," and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes
You know I don't know what works in a garden so let me tell you what I'm about to do:

I was at the grocery and bought 4 Shallots in a net bag, name was “Frieda's" company, product of USA.

I am going to plant these things. I suppose I plant the root side down and have the whole thing covered with potting soil. I have a really big pot out there to do this, big enough for all four of these things.

I don't know what will happen to them, they will probably die because I'm not supposed to do it, or is there a chance they make more Shallots, like divide or something?

Anyone want to stop me before I do this as it would be useless?

42 posted on 04/05/2013 4:35:57 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Silentgypsy
It's hard to go wrong with 3 sisters. I learned in the mountains of New Mexico from old women that barely spoke spanish and spoke NO english. Their families had been there before there was a United States.

The squash they used isn't crookneck or zucchini, but those work. I'll also be using muskmelons this year, as they do a better ground cover thing.

The old women used pine needles for mulch, so they didn't have much in the way of weeds coming up anyway.

I did come away with some of their pinto beans to use for seed. I've kept those going and will use those again this year.

/johnny

43 posted on 04/05/2013 4:39:08 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Marcella
If they haven't been treated to keep them from sprouting, you'll have a crop you can sell for cash. Shallots are like garlic in that regard.

And so what if it fails? Life is like that. You try something and the next day, get your pants off the neighbor's roof and rethink the situation and do a little study.

It's ok to screw up. It's how humans learn. Or don't, in some cases. ;)

/johnny

44 posted on 04/05/2013 4:42:46 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: greeneyes

I follow that budget plan. Not sure what I’ll do about bath towels yet. Mine are still in reasonable condition but their day’s coming.


45 posted on 04/05/2013 4:48:04 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: Marcella

I planted their elephant garlic in a raised bed about 2 and a half months ago. It’s about a foot tall now and happy as a clam.


46 posted on 04/05/2013 4:49:06 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Black Agnes
“I planted their elephant garlic in a raised bed about 2 and a half months ago. It’s about a foot tall now and happy as a clam.”

Did you just buy it at the grocery or was it at a garden place so you knew it was to plant?

I think I won't use that big pot. I've got a wood planter on the ground and if this thing does multiply, better to have it where it can spread out than have it in a big pot. I also have a planter attached to a brick wall but it doesn't get much sun. Maybe I'll plant one of them there and see if that one lives.

I'll do this planting tomorrow.

47 posted on 04/05/2013 5:10:22 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Marcella

It was an elephant garlic bulb I got at the grocery store. I broke the individual bulbs off the base plate, soaked it overnight in warm water, peeled all the papery stuff off and planted the cloves, pointy side up, about 8” apart, square.

I planted out a bunch of the regular California white garlic from the grocery store too. Went to make garlic butter, opened up a clove and saw little green sprouts! Did the same thing. Broke them all off the base plate, gently, soaked them and peeled them and planted them pointy side up about 6” square.

Those are about 10” tall now too. Even the teeny little ones. I have the super teeny ones planted in a container on my driveway.

BTW, the smaller the clove you plant, the smaller the garlic bulb. Lots of places tell you to sort it before you plant it, use the teeny ones in the kitchen, and only plant out the bigger cloves. I wasn’t going to peel all those little ones that weren’t much bigger than my fingernail. And I didn’t have the heart to throw them away either. So I’m going to feed them this spring and summer and see how big they get.


48 posted on 04/05/2013 5:18:43 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Black Agnes

“soaked it overnight in warm water, peeled all the papery stuff off and planted the cloves, pointy side up, about 8” apart, square.”

So, I should soak these bulbs in warm water overnight, then peel the papery stuff off these, then plant tomorrow?


49 posted on 04/05/2013 6:22:42 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: Black Agnes
Not sure what I’ll do about bath towels yet.

When in Big Lots, always check their towels. Sometimes they have very nice ones, thick, large, and not always made in China. Some days, they just have ordinary towels, but I have found some really great towels at times, and for good prices.
50 posted on 04/05/2013 6:28:39 PM PDT by Nepeta
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-100101-124 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson