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Help! Ethernet hub

Posted on 04/16/2013 9:03:44 AM PDT by djf

I have an eight port ethernet hub that has unfortunately become separated from it's power supply.

I've googled everything I can see on it to find out what the power rating is, cause I have tons of power supplies, and can rig one up easy IF I know the voltage and +/- setup.

Anybody know any way to figure this out? I have one of the universal power supplies that can deliver 3V, 5V, 6V, 9V, etc but don''t want to blow it up by hooking the voltage up backwards!

Would appreciate any hints and tips!


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 04/16/2013 9:03:44 AM PDT by djf
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To: djf

Start with 5V - most computer electronics are made for that

if it doesn’t work go up by 2 until it turns on

you should be OK


2 posted on 04/16/2013 9:05:16 AM PDT by Mr. K (There are lies, damned lies, statistics, and democrat talking points.)
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To: djf

If you have the manufacturer and model, you should have no problem finding wattage ratings for the device.


3 posted on 04/16/2013 9:05:37 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: djf

Does it have a label on the back?


4 posted on 04/16/2013 9:05:45 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: djf

Check the power supply input plug on the back of the unit. The specs are normally there...e.g., something like “3v” and the polarity will also be shown. Power consumption may not be there, but it’ll be low enough that pretty much any power supply matching the voltage will do.

Not to worry if your replacement supply can supply much more current than needed - the unit will draw only what it needs if the supply voltage is correct.


5 posted on 04/16/2013 9:06:27 AM PDT by Da Coyote
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To: djf

You should be able to get an eight port hub for $5 at the local Salvation Army.


6 posted on 04/16/2013 9:07:21 AM PDT by Dr. Sivana (HRC:"Sometimes she looks like a primary schoolgirl and sometimes a pensioner going shopping,"-NKorea)
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To: djf

A few more hints might be helpful. What hub you are trying to use? How did it become ‘separated’? That sort of thing.


7 posted on 04/16/2013 9:08:01 AM PDT by Wingy
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To: djf

Many of them are 12vdc but if you Google the make and model of the hub, you can probably find out.


8 posted on 04/16/2013 9:08:18 AM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: Mr. K

That’s kinda what I was thinking... the reason it is separated from the power supply is I might have sacrificed it in the past to hook up to something else!

I have two boxes full of various voltages, parity, amp rating... what can I say, I’m like them hoarder people!


9 posted on 04/16/2013 9:08:49 AM PDT by djf (Rich widows: My Bitcoin address is... 1ETDmR4GDjwmc9rUEQnfB1gAnk6WLmd3n6)
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To: djf

Make? Model? Throw me a bone here people.


10 posted on 04/16/2013 9:09:32 AM PDT by Ray76 (Do you reject Obama? And all his works? And all his empty promises?)
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To: djf

I have started taping the gadget it is meant for to the chord so I can easily identify what it was for. I have about 100 of those silly things


11 posted on 04/16/2013 9:15:28 AM PDT by Mr. K (There are lies, damned lies, statistics, and democrat talking points.)
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To: Mr. K

OK the polarity is indicated on the case but not the voltage - I tested with increasing voltage, 1.5 3 and at 4.5 the lights start flashing, then go out... so I’m thinking 5...


12 posted on 04/16/2013 9:22:24 AM PDT by djf (Rich widows: My Bitcoin address is... 1ETDmR4GDjwmc9rUEQnfB1gAnk6WLmd3n6)
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To: Mr. K

I have started taping the gadget it is meant for to the chord so I can easily identify what it was for. I have about 100 of those silly things

Good idea.


13 posted on 04/16/2013 9:27:44 AM PDT by djf (Rich widows: My Bitcoin address is... 1ETDmR4GDjwmc9rUEQnfB1gAnk6WLmd3n6)
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To: djf

cord


14 posted on 04/16/2013 9:28:28 AM PDT by Ray76 (Do you reject Obama? And all his works? And all his empty promises?)
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To: djf

the OUTER part of the connector is *usually* the ground

(PLEASE correct me anyone if i am wrong)


15 posted on 04/16/2013 9:32:44 AM PDT by Mr. K (There are lies, damned lies, statistics, and democrat talking points.)
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To: djf

you won’t go wrong with +/- a volt or so

Just dont plug 120AC into it

I started taping a TAG to my devices and cords so I know what the voltage is and what device it goes to


16 posted on 04/16/2013 9:34:33 AM PDT by Mr. K (There are lies, damned lies, statistics, and democrat talking points.)
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To: Mr. K

I blew up a laptop once that had a 12V input.

Hooked it to a car battery.

Worked for a few minutes, then started smelling funny... there was a flash, then nuthin

Couldn’t handle 12.6 volts. Actually, probably too many amps at a bit of an overvoltage

chit happens - it was a freebie, now its spare parts, no biggie!


17 posted on 04/16/2013 9:54:53 AM PDT by djf (Rich widows: My Bitcoin address is... 1ETDmR4GDjwmc9rUEQnfB1gAnk6WLmd3n6)
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To: djf
Much of what I see these days is 12v DC, positive pole, 1000 milliamps. Give that a try.

If that's really a "hub", and not a switch, dude, replace it. Hubs are so "90s", like zip drives.

18 posted on 04/16/2013 10:10:37 AM PDT by Lee N. Field ("You keep using that verse, but I do not think it means what you think it means." --I. Montoya)
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To: djf
No hub will be designed to take less than 5 volts. That is because the USB standard is 5 volts.

Polarity should be marked on the hub. There should be a diagram with a broken line above a solid line, or the reverse. This indicates polarity. Google "DC polarity markings" to learn more.

19 posted on 04/16/2013 10:36:09 AM PDT by backwoods-engineer (Blog: www.BackwoodsEngineer.com)
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To: backwoods-engineer

Sorry, I said, USB, I meant to say 10baseT.


20 posted on 04/16/2013 10:36:59 AM PDT by backwoods-engineer (Blog: www.BackwoodsEngineer.com)
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To: backwoods-engineer

Yeah, it shows polarity, just not voltage.

It lights up at 4.5 volts, but when I plug an ethernet cable in from another machine, the connect light doesn’t come on and the other computer doesn’t see the hub.

So it’s pretty much almost sure near positive that 5 volts would work.

But it’s a halfway sunny day here near Seattle, so I’ll mess with it when it rains!

Thanks for the help! I really don’t need it, my wireless router assigns all my IP addresses...


21 posted on 04/16/2013 10:41:58 AM PDT by djf (Rich widows: My Bitcoin address is... 1ETDmR4GDjwmc9rUEQnfB1gAnk6WLmd3n6)
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To: djf
I have 2 hubs in my junk drawer. Both use 5v DC 1000ma. If you don't have a transformer that is at least 800ma or so, I suspect trouble. It will overheat and damage something. If you use a 5v 200ma, it may blink or do strange things even if the voltage is right. Too many milliamps and nothing bad will happen.

I still say you could look up the model on Google and it will tell you. Try giving us the model and maybe we can help.

22 posted on 04/16/2013 10:45:15 AM PDT by chuckles
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To: chuckles

I googled. Been there. Dun that. All the company names on the device or any stickers on the device. the given model name Leehub something... the FCC id, the part number on the board inside, trust me, I googled!

I’ll try five volts later. The only reason I was playing with it is I loaned a friend an old laptop and one of my better wireless PCI cards, and I was thinking about trying to get another machine on my network.

Not a biggie.


23 posted on 04/16/2013 10:53:02 AM PDT by djf (Rich widows: My Bitcoin address is... 1ETDmR4GDjwmc9rUEQnfB1gAnk6WLmd3n6)
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To: djf

You can think of electricity as simlar to water flowing.

You hooked up a 12’ft high water tower to your laptop with a firehose, not a kitchen sink hose.


24 posted on 04/16/2013 11:57:10 AM PDT by Mr. K (There are lies, damned lies, statistics, and democrat talking points.)
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To: djf
If it were me, I'd open it up carefully and inspect the circuit board where the power jack is soldered in. You can pretty easily determine polarity from there and it is possible that the voltage is printed in that area as well. It should be printed on the PCB somewhere near the power supply. Just look for a transformer attached to the PCB. You may need a magnifying glass.

I've done this with success a few times.

At the very least, you can get a Mfr and Model # that way and Google it for the specs.

25 posted on 04/16/2013 12:13:54 PM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (For me, I plan to die standing as a free man rather than spend one second on my knees as a slave.)
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To: djf

Most of the time there will be either a sticker or silk screening directly on the casing either near the power socket or on the bottom that supplies this info.

Universals can work pretty well for networking equipment...ran my previous DSL modem for the last 2+ years of its life on one after the second or third wall wart fell apart. All the info was right on the bottom on a silver sticker.


26 posted on 04/16/2013 8:29:09 PM PDT by Fire_on_High (RIP City of Heroes and Paragon Studios, victim of the Obamaconomy.)
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To: djf

If you want just one more machine on your network, you could just make a cord with transmit and receive reversed. Just plug from one jack to the other and you are networked. Pick one machine as a gateway and set it up to get the other on the net. Another thing I used for years was an old doorstop 486 with software that made it into a router. It was fun to play with because you could configure it to be a server, print server, ect. All of it fit on one 3.5 floppy. You just boot it up and all 3 of my puters were online all day without a hitch.


27 posted on 04/17/2013 1:37:50 AM PDT by chuckles
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To: backwoods-engineer; Mr. K; chuckles; All

OK!!

At 4.5V the unit appeared to power up... but nothing I could do would make the connect LED come on or the laptop see it.

So I rigged up a 5V, and tried that, same results EXCEPT the LEDS that came on were dimmer than they were for the 4.5V try. Still same results with the connectivity - NONE!

So I was a bit leery, but figured if I can’t make it work, I might as well junk it and not fret, so I figure I’d push it to 6V.

6V the lights flashed vigorously and it powered up like it did at 4.5V.

I commenced plugging in ethernet cables.

I have 4 or 5 flavors of ethernet. Varying lengths. Most are grey/white. A couple are yellow. two are red.

The grey/white ones didn’t do squat. The yellow ones also failed. One of the red ones failed.

But one worked.

It is labeled CAT5 UTP PATCH 4 PAIR

The connect LED on the unit came on and Windows XP assigned it an IP address!

I suspect the red cable is a crossover cable, the kind of thing we used to do to connect computers without an external modem...

So thanks to all for the help! Lots of good advice.
Can’t help myself... I just love tinkering!


28 posted on 04/17/2013 1:17:59 PM PDT by djf (Rich widows: My Bitcoin address is... 1ETDmR4GDjwmc9rUEQnfB1gAnk6WLmd3n6)
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To: djf

I would kick it up to 9v. It could also be that the transformer doesn’t have the milliamps to do the job. mine are both 1 amp or 1000 ma. not providing adequate current causes voltage drop and heat.


29 posted on 04/17/2013 4:30:32 PM PDT by chuckles
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