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Oldest European Medieval Cookbook Found
Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, April 17, 2013 | Jennifer Viegas

Posted on 04/20/2013 8:42:31 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

A 12th-century manuscript contains the oldest known European Medieval food recipes, according to new research.

The recipes, which include both food and medical ointment concoctions, were compiled and written in Latin. Someone jotted them down at Durham Cathedral's monastery in the year 1140.

It was essentially a health book, so the meals were meant to improve a person's health or to cure certain afflictions. The other earliest known such recipes dated to 1290.

Many of the dishes sound like they would work on a modern restaurant menu...

Gasper added, "The sauces typically feature parsley, sage, pepper, garlic, mustard and coriander, which I suspect may give them a Mediterranean feel when we recreate them. According to the text, one of the recipes comes from the Poitou region of what is now modern central western France. This shows the extent to which international travel and exchange of ideas took place within the medieval period. And what more evocative example of cultural exchange could there be than food?"

Gaspar and colleagues are recreating some of the dishes for a workshop to be held on April 25 at Blackfriars Restaurant in Newcastle, U.K. A lunch the following Saturday will feature the same dishes. The researchers are also putting together a translation of the cookbook under the title "Zinziber" (Latin for ginger).

While much of the food is still tasty to modern palates, not all of the medical cures would work today.

(Excerpt) Read more at news.discovery.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: dietandcuisine; godsgravesglyphs
Samuel Woods, Jacqueline Pankhurst, Samantha Ellis, Lydia Harris, Andy Hook, Daniel Duggan and Giles Gasper preparing one of the Medieval dishes; Credit: Durham University

Samuel Woods, Jacqueline Pankhurst, Samantha Ellis, Lydia Harris, Andy Hook, Daniel Duggan and Giles Gasper preparing one of the Medieval dishes; Credit: Durham University

1 posted on 04/20/2013 8:42:31 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


2 posted on 04/20/2013 8:43:02 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Romney would have been worse, if you're a dumb ass.)
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To: SunkenCiv

3 posted on 04/20/2013 8:44:56 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: SunkenCiv

Was it titled “To Serve Man”?


4 posted on 04/20/2013 8:45:11 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: SunkenCiv

Eye of newt!


5 posted on 04/20/2013 8:47:00 PM PDT by Empireoftheatom48 (God help the Republic but will he?)
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To: SunkenCiv

“To The King’s Taste: Richard II’s Book Of Feasts and Recipes Adapted For Modern Cooking”, Lorna J Sass (1975)


6 posted on 04/20/2013 8:50:35 PM PDT by onedoug
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To: onedoug
Wonder if it had the recipe for Hassenpfeffer?


7 posted on 04/20/2013 8:52:41 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: SunkenCiv

I hasn’t et a good rutabaga pie in ages!


8 posted on 04/20/2013 8:57:29 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: SunkenCiv

And I thought this was an old cookbook:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/15019/15019-h/15019-h.htm

A QUEENS Delight; OR, The Art of Preserving, Conserving and Candying.

As also
A right Knowledge of making Perfumes, and Distilling the most Excellent Waters.

Never before Published.

LONDON,
Printed by E. Tyler, and R. Holt, for Nath.
Brooke, at the Angel in Corn-Hill, near the
Royal Exchange. 1671.


9 posted on 04/20/2013 8:59:53 PM PDT by Texas Fossil
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To: Mastador1

Was it titled “To Serve Man”?


LOL

Was that Twilight Zone? It’s been years.


10 posted on 04/20/2013 9:26:56 PM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it. Their minds have been stolen.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Wish they’d publish it.


11 posted on 04/20/2013 9:41:04 PM PDT by bgill
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To: laplata

Yes Twilight Zone, it stays with you like a good memory.


12 posted on 04/20/2013 9:44:56 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: SunkenCiv
not all of the medical cures would work today.

Really? I wonder.

13 posted on 04/20/2013 9:46:18 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: Mastador1

Thanks for confirming that. Now I won’t be wondering about it all night. LOL


14 posted on 04/20/2013 9:49:19 PM PDT by laplata (Liberals don't get it. Their minds have been stolen.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Does it have the ancient green bean casserole recipe? with the mushroom soup and the french fried onions?


15 posted on 04/20/2013 9:49:22 PM PDT by married21
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To: SunkenCiv
probably has:
16 posted on 04/20/2013 9:51:32 PM PDT by ZinGirl (kids in college....can't afford a tagline right now)
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To: ZinGirl

LOL. ;-)


17 posted on 04/20/2013 9:52:01 PM PDT by Tau Food (Never give a sword to a man who can't dance.)
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To: BenLurkin
You mean Drinking a spoonful of Mercury wont cure Syphilis?
18 posted on 04/20/2013 10:00:49 PM PDT by Husker24
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To: SunkenCiv

I found one for bread, one part water two parts saw dust, sounds delicious!


19 posted on 04/20/2013 10:02:08 PM PDT by Husker24
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To: Husker24

Must have been some reason it was used for centuries.

Side effects would be nasty though.


20 posted on 04/20/2013 10:04:25 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
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To: BenLurkin

Well, after using it a couple of times, I suppose your original ailment would be the least of your concerns.


21 posted on 04/20/2013 10:07:00 PM PDT by Husker24
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To: SunkenCiv
Amazon has a bunch of free Kindle ebooks, some of them old cookbooks. I downloaded one for fun about a year ago called "The forme of cury a roll of ancient English cookery compiled, about A.D. 1390." The recipes didn't look very good to me! For instance, here's how to make noumbles...
Take noumbles of Deer oper of oper beest parboile hem kerf hem to dyce. take the self broth or better. take brede and grynde with the broth. and take the oynouns and parboyle hem. and mynce hem smale and do per to. colour it with blode and do per to powdour fort and salt and boyle it wele and serue it fort --Copied word for word, capitalization, punctuation, everything.
Yum!
22 posted on 04/20/2013 10:31:27 PM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: Husker24
not all of the medical cures would work today.

If they worked then, they would still work today; if they don't work today, they didn't work then, either.

Translation from Presstitutese: "Not all the medical cures are efficacious." )Nor safe, most likely.)

23 posted on 04/20/2013 11:20:37 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: SunkenCiv
“For ‘tiny little fish’: juice of coriander and garlic, mixed with pepper and garlic.”

Problem: do they mean "juicing" coriander plants (cilantro); extracting oils/juice from the coriander seeds; or a decoction of cilantro?

At least it has enough garlic in it to cover the day(s)-old fish smell & taste.

24 posted on 04/20/2013 11:27:17 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: LibWhacker
"oynouns"

That's obviously 'onions', but I sure would like to hear how they pronounced it.

It's interesting how languages change over time. I read somewhere once, that if a person from the present were to go back to the time of Shakespeare, that the English of the day would sound like a foreign language.

I believe it. I once asked a Cockney guy on the street in London for directions, and couldn't understand half of what he said.

25 posted on 04/20/2013 11:50:42 PM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: Empireoftheatom48

“Eye of newt”

She turned me in to a newt!

A newt?

I got better...


26 posted on 04/21/2013 12:15:13 AM PDT by BigCinBigD (...Was that okay?)
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To: Windflier
I read somewhere once, that if a person from the present were to go back to the time of Shakespeare, that the English of the day would sound like a foreign language.

I believe it! Reading Shakespeare, even given the close similarity to modern English, is almost impossible for me. At least, I don't get very much out of it without help.

Fortunately, when we studied Shakespeare at the university, we used fantastic study guides which had footnotes that explained every word, phrase or sentence that might have given us a problem. That's the ONLY way to study Shakespeare! Check this out... Just found it ==> http://midenglishrecipes.blogspot.com/

27 posted on 04/21/2013 12:17:22 AM PDT by LibWhacker
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To: LibWhacker
Fortunately, when we studied Shakespeare at the university, we used fantastic study guides which had footnotes that explained every word, phrase or sentence that might have given us a problem.

I don't know what it is, but even when I was a kid, I had no problem following Shakespeare. Could have had something to do with the fact that my mom read to us all the time from adult fare, or the fact that Mom and Dad spoke straight adult English to us kids from the time we were little.

Dunno, but I always excelled in school at anything having to do with English. It was my easiest subject. Modern English came easy to me, and that ease extended into older forms of the language, and even some foreign tongues. I do know that I was reading rudimentary words before I started school.

When I was working in England, I used to translate the tougher Northern and Scottish accents for my American friends. My ear just seemed to tune in better than theirs.

28 posted on 04/21/2013 12:32:59 AM PDT by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Interesting stuff. Odd, though, that the article does not disclose where this cookbook was “found” or how such a discovery came to light.


29 posted on 04/21/2013 1:35:30 AM PDT by Bigg Red (Restore us, O God of hosts; let your face shine, that we may be saved! -Ps80)
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To: dfwgator
Is there a recipe for cooking heads? ;-)
30 posted on 04/21/2013 4:01:03 AM PDT by Average Al
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To: dfwgator
good Simpsons Halloween special homage to this:


31 posted on 04/21/2013 4:17:31 AM PDT by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight,, he'll just kill you.)
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To: bigheadfred

What’s more, you will never et a good rutabaga pie because there will never be a good rutabaga pie, even one garnished with anchovies


32 posted on 04/21/2013 4:24:58 AM PDT by bert ((K.E. N.P. N.C. +12 .....History is a process, not an event)
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To: bert

Sorry to interrupt, but rutabaga/carrot/pea pie ain’t bad with good gravy. Now, for desert a sweet rhubarb pie with honey cream would top it off, fair thee well.


33 posted on 04/21/2013 4:35:15 AM PDT by RedHeeler
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To: SunkenCiv; Slings and Arrows

34 posted on 04/21/2013 5:28:10 AM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: dfwgator

Thanks for the Bugs frame...found it on YouTube. Hysterical.


35 posted on 04/21/2013 5:38:17 AM PDT by BobL (Look up "CSCOPE" if you want to see something really scary)
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To: SunkenCiv

The lament of a Roasting Medieval Goose:

Olim lacus colueram, Once I lived on lakes,
olim pulcher extiteram, once I looked beautiful
dum cignus ego fueram. when I was a swan.
(Male chorus)
Miser, miser! Misery me!
modo niger Now black
et ustus fortiter! and roasting fiercely!
(Tenor)
Girat, regirat garcifer; The servant is turning me on the spit;
me rogus urit fortiter; I am burning fiercely on the pyre:
propinat me nunc dapifer, the steward now serves me up.
(Male Chorus)
Miser, miser! Misery me!
modo niger Now black
et ustus fortiter! and roasting fiercely!
(Tenor)
Nunc in scutella iaceo, Now I lie on a plate,
et volitare nequeo and cannot fly anymore,
dentes frendentes video: I see bared teeth:
(Male Chorus)
Miser, miser! Misery me!
modo niger Now black
et ustus fortiter! and roasting fiercely!

(Carmina Burana Carl Orff, adapted from a 12th Century source)


36 posted on 04/21/2013 5:47:23 AM PDT by left that other site (Worry is the darkroom that developes negatives.)
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To: married21

“Does it have the ancient green bean casserole recipe? with the mushroom soup and the french fried onions?”

I despise that creation and once read on a thread dedicated to it’s corruption that a soup company (Campbells?) invented that culinary offense as a way to sell more product during the holidays.


37 posted on 04/21/2013 5:52:55 AM PDT by Rebelbase (1929-1950's, 20+years for full recovery. How long this time?)
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To: SunkenCiv
If it's meat - boil it.

If it stinks - use it as a poultice.

38 posted on 04/21/2013 6:00:17 AM PDT by trebb (Where in the the hell has my country gone?)
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To: left that other site

Had a great feast at an SCA event late night..lots of meieval cooking is very good. Course some not so much..


39 posted on 04/21/2013 8:23:03 AM PDT by Mmogamer (I refudiate the lamestream media, leftists and their prevaricutions.)
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To: martin_fierro

The fact that the cats are doing their own work is how we know it’s fantasy.


40 posted on 04/21/2013 11:14:48 AM PDT by Slings and Arrows (You can't have IngSoc without an Emmanuel Goldstein.)
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