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Sittler's single-game points record still untouched
NHL official publication ^ | Feb 7 2013 | John Kreiser - NHL.com Columnist

Posted on 04/22/2013 5:25:12 PM PDT by MarkBsnr

Records are made to be broken. But the mark Darryl Sittler set on Feb. 7, 1976, continues to stand the test of time.

On that early February night, Sittler shattered one of the most famous marks in hockey -- Maurice Richard's record of eight points in a game, a record set by "The Rocket" in December 1944 and matched only once in the next 32 years -- by Bert Olmstead in 1954. Richard had five goals and three assists; Sittler had one more of each, scoring six times and setting up four more goals as the Toronto Maple Leafs routed the Boston Bruins 11-4.

Twitter pictorial: Sittler's 10-point night

@NHLHabes revisits all 10 Sittler points

Sittler's 10-point night came out of nowhere. The Maple Leafs entered the game in a 1-4-2 funk that had led owner Harold Ballard to call him out for a lack of production. They were barely over .500 at 21-20-11. The Bruins, on the other hand, came to Toronto 20 points ahead of the Leafs in the Adams Division standings, having won seven in a row and riding a 15-1-1 surge. Boston had gotten a boost from the goaltending of rookie Dave Reece, who posted a 7-4-2 record while backing up Gilles Gilbert before the Bruins announced that longtime goaltender Gerry Cheevers was returning from the World Hockey Association.

That meant Reece would be headed back to the minors, but not before he was on the wrong end of history.

(Excerpt) Read more at nhl.com ...


TOPICS: History; Music/Entertainment
KEYWORDS: 10points; darrylsittler; hockey; record
I saw that game. Since then, the Great Gretzky and so many giants of the hockey world have played, and none equalled it. The line of Sittler, McDonald and Ellis is one of the best in hocky history, as is the defensive pair of Salming and Turnbull.

Let us hope that the Leafs have a date with Lord Stanley's cup in a few weeks.

1 posted on 04/22/2013 5:25:12 PM PDT by MarkBsnr
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To: MarkBsnr

Best Gretzky ever did was 8 points in a game....but did it like 4 times...


2 posted on 04/22/2013 6:36:45 PM PDT by basalt
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To: MarkBsnr
It's amazing that some records stand the test of time like this. At least Sittler was a great player himself, so it's not one of these wacky records by someone who never had any other noteworthy accomplishments in sports. You see a few of those in a sport like baseball. Some guy named Bill Fischer, for example, set a pitching record back in 1962 (84+ consecutive innings without a walk) that still stands today.

One relatively obscure NHL player with an interesting record is Patrik Sundstrom -- who played for Vancouver and New Jersey in a career that lasted about ten years through the 1980s. In 1988 he set a similar record to Sittler's -- most points in a playoff game, with eight. Mario Lemiux tied it a few years later, but it still stands today.

One of the most remarkable things about Wayne Gretzky isn't just the number of records he set during his career, but the durability of those records. He retired with 61 NHL records and holds 60 today -- 15 years later.

3 posted on 04/22/2013 7:25:00 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: basalt
That's another thing about Gretzky that's always amazed me. Not only did he set a lot of records, but he reached a lot of amazing scoring totals multiple times in his career. He's the only NHL player ever to score 200 points in a season, for example, and he's done it FOUR TIMES.
4 posted on 04/22/2013 7:27:38 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: Alberta's Child

Take away all 894 goals that Gretzky scored...and he’d still be the N.H.L all time leading scorer. Yikes. He transcended the game...greatest player of any team sport ever.


5 posted on 04/22/2013 7:42:39 PM PDT by basalt
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To: basalt
The scary thing about Gretzky was the was never much of a "natural" goal scorer. He didn't have Jari Kurri's speed or deadly shot, Mario Lemieux's unbelievable hands, or the physical presence around the net of someone like Cam Neely or Mark Messier. But he had an uncanny ability to put himself in the perfect position to score goals, and had better "ice vision" than anyone I've ever seen.

Let's also give credit where credit is due, though. He played on some ridiculously talented teams that you'll probably never see again in the age of the NHL salary cap. I watched a replay of one of their Stanley Cup clinching games against Boston back in the 1980s, and their first power play unit was ridiculous. Messier moved over to left wing alongside Gretzky, Kurri dropped back to play the right point next to Paul Coffey, and Glenn Anderson played right wing in Kurri's place next to Gretzky. With Grant Fuhr in net you had SIX future Hall of Famers on the ice.

6 posted on 04/22/2013 8:11:15 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: Alberta's Child

Actually, that was probably the 1987 Finals against Philadelphia I was watching. They beat the Bruins in 1988 but I think Coffey had been traded by that time.


7 posted on 04/22/2013 8:15:38 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: basalt

I still remember watching the game where Gretzky scored 5 goals in the Oilers’ 39th game of the season to get to 50. that’s 50 goals in 39 games. The previous benchmark for awesomeness was the extremely rare feat of 50 goals in 50 games.


8 posted on 04/22/2013 8:18:23 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: MarkBsnr
The Flyers and Leafs had a great rivalry back in those days. And so did the Islanders and Leafs. The Habs and Bruins were fun to watch, every time, and even the Sabres had their moments, as well as the Blues, Red Wings, and Blackhawks. Hockey was much different back then. It was simply a far better product than what's going on today.

Some of it is because of the helmet rule, and some of it is because of the anti-fighting political correctness. A lot of it, though, is because the league expanded too fast and spread the talent too thin - - to cities that don't even get natural ice in the winter? (/facepalm) But mainly, the league just doesn't seem to have the character it once had - - the names flow like water from my memory: Guy Lafluer, Mike Bossy, Borje Salming (who drove teams nuts with that high pop flip thing he used to do to clear the puck), Brian Trottier, Tim Kerr, Bobby Clarke, Bobby Orr, Phil Esposito, Denis Potvin, Ken Dryden... on and on and on. You knew all the players, all the stars back then.

One of my favorite memories from back in the olden days was going down to the Spectrum to see the Flyers take on the Whalers. There were Gordie, Marty, and Mark Howe, all playing hockey, live, right before my eyes. It was a cool thing.

9 posted on 04/22/2013 8:36:20 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: Lancey Howard

the game now ,to me, is simply unwatchable. After seeing those great Oiler teams from the 1980’s..its just too defensive now. Teams started using these “defensive systems” in the mid 90’s to try and keep up with the more talented teams and to me,ruined the game. The stars cant do what they do best. Now, they got all these crazy rules to try and open up the scoring, and its just not working. Goalie pads are just ridiculously big...i dont know..all the games look the same to me now. 2-1...3-2...awful. A scrambled mess..shoot outs...2 line passes are allowed now. Its a mess.


10 posted on 04/22/2013 8:45:23 PM PDT by basalt
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To: Alberta's Child

youre right about Gretzky...he would just always seem to be ‘there”...he would just come out of nowhere.


11 posted on 04/22/2013 8:52:16 PM PDT by basalt
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To: basalt

He played as a 17 year old here in Indianapolis for the Racers. What might have been.


12 posted on 04/22/2013 8:59:21 PM PDT by InvisibleChurch (http://thegatwickview.tumblr.com/)
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To: basalt

Good points. I forgot to mention all the stupid rules tinkering. Teams would have figured out a way to beat the “trap” defense (thanks, Devils) eventually. And what the hell was wrong with regular season ties anyway? The system worked in the NHL for 50+ years or whatever, and I never had a problem with a regular season tie. Each team got a point, so what? The 5-minute overtime was okay, I suppose, but the shootouts? Ludicrous.

Yeah, I miss ‘70s and ‘80s hockey.


13 posted on 04/22/2013 9:16:40 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: basalt
He transcended the game...greatest player of any team sport ever.

Hands down. Okay, there are arguments for Babe Ruth and Wilt Chamberlain, but nobody else. I still go with Gretzky.

14 posted on 04/22/2013 9:19:23 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: Alberta's Child

I’m a Flyers fan and watching that series gave me panic attacks! It was one of the great ones! Tim Kerr, Brian Propp, Ron Hextall, Mark Howe....


15 posted on 04/22/2013 9:20:22 PM PDT by Amberdawn
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To: Lancey Howard

i have those Canada Cups games from 1984 and 1987 on DVD...Team Canada vs the Soviets...Gretzky and Mario on the the same line..man,astonishing hockey games.


16 posted on 04/22/2013 9:33:17 PM PDT by basalt
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To: basalt

One of the greatest moments happened when the USSR’s Red Army team came to North America for the first time in 1976 and was blowing through the NHL until they faced the Stanley Cup Flyers. When Ed Van Imp leveled that Russian dude with a hip check and the Red Army team left the ice in protest, I just howled! It was “the check felt ‘round the world”. The Flyers kicked their asses. THOSE were the days.


17 posted on 04/22/2013 10:34:48 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: basalt

Here’s aclip of the Flyers destroying the Red Army team. The calls are made by the great Gene Hart:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOxF_LFfq5g


18 posted on 04/22/2013 10:41:37 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: Lancey Howard

HBO has a great documentary on the Broad Street Bullies teams from the 70’s. The Russians actually left the ice, but Ed Snider told em “fine..then u dont get paid”..5 minutes later they were back on the ice..too funny. Interesting title on that you tube clip..”Van Impe kills Kharlomov”....Kharlomov actually was killed a few years later in a car accident.


19 posted on 04/22/2013 10:49:31 PM PDT by basalt
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To: basalt
HBO has a great documentary on the Broad Street Bullies teams from the 70’s.

I was at the Spectrum a lot back then. My brother and I used to go down on a whim and buy the cheapest tickets we could find from the street scalpers. There was this couple who had season tickets down in the good seats, center ice, and they would routinely watch the 1st period from their seats and then leave and watch the rest of the game at the Spectrum's on site restaurant, the Ovations Club. I guess they would eat and drink and watch the rest of the game on TV there. Anyway, after the 1st period, my brother and I would always take those seats for the rest of the game. You can't really do that kind of stuff anymore, but like I said, "those were the days..."

20 posted on 04/22/2013 11:54:44 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: MarkBsnr

Wayne skated his whole life with a goon on the ice to protect him.

Gordie Howe did his own checking and fighting.

We will never know how many points “The Great One” would have scored if he was goonless, but I suggest he would not have matched the records of Howe, Hull, Orr, etc.


21 posted on 04/23/2013 4:47:48 AM PDT by AlbertWang
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To: basalt
Good points, but I have to disagree with you on big one. The "defensive systems" you refer to actually go back a long ways. It was the Montreal Canadiens who adopted the neutral-zone trap and then worked it to perfection in the 1970s. It's really a European approach to hockey, built around the challenges of defending a larger ice surface with less restrictive offsides rules (the elimination of the red line under current NHL rules that allow longer passes into the neutral zone was adopted by the NHL to match international rules).

The Edmonton Oilers were actually the exception in a lot of ways, not the norm. There's been a swing back and forth in the NHL between the "Montreal style" and the "Edmonton style," and as others have pointed out, the expansion of the last two decades has spread a limited talent pool over a larger league and made it more difficult to get a lot of talent concentrated on one team.

22 posted on 04/23/2013 6:13:50 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: Amberdawn

That was one of the rare times when a player from the losing team (Ron Hextall) won the Conn Smythe Trophy as the playoff MVP.


23 posted on 04/23/2013 6:15:23 PM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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To: Alberta's Child

I don’t know....teams are scoring at a pace from the 1940’s. Most sports progress in records being broke...athletes being more skilled etc..but the NHL seems to be going backwards. I noticed it in 1995..when the New Jersey Devils “trapped” and swept a powerful Red Wings team...then it seems all the teams went that way...thats when the Wings finally won the Cup in 1997...Yzerman was told he’d have to play a more “defensive” game. Now they are kinda panicking with all these bizarre rule changes..trapezoids..move the net back,,,then move it front...if the Oilers played with 2 line passes allowed...geez, Wayne would have scored 2000 goals. Theres no more end to end rushes..the neutral zone is constantly clogged up..most goals seem like garbage goals..theers just no flow to the games like there used to be. The Montreal teams were very good defensively,,,but also a very high scoring team..one of the best ever. The stars cant do their thing it seems..and that’s not a good place to be.


24 posted on 04/23/2013 7:30:15 PM PDT by basalt
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To: basalt

also...if you remember the “Edmonton” rule in the 1980’s..the league actually changed the offsetting penaly rule...to try and slow the OIlers down...when they were 4 on 4..they were unstoppable. The league just couldn’t believe this “W.H.A. team was destroying the record book. I loved it. lol


25 posted on 04/23/2013 7:35:59 PM PDT by basalt
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To: basalt
I've said for a long time that one of the biggest factors in the decline of scoring in the NHL -- along with: (1) the dilution of talent that came with expansion, and (2) the emergence of highly-skilled athletes at the goaltender position (Patrick Roy was really the first of these) -- has been the increase in the size of players. The skilled players have a much harder time playing the game to their level simply because they don't have the room to do it anymore. The rink looks smaller these days because it sort of is smaller. The ten-year period from the mid-80s to the mid-90s probably saw the most dramatic time for this. And by bigger players I don't just mean bigger in size; I'm talking about bigger highly skilled players. Look at a guy like Mark Messier. Back in the 1980s he was a giant. And yet in the 1997 Eastern Conference Finals against Philadelphia he was getting owned like a rag doll by Eric Lindros -- who was at least three inches taller than him and 25-30 pounds heavier.

You see the same thing in basketball, by the way. The giant players who dominate the game have effectively shrunk the court. The only two major team sports where scoring has increased considerably in recent decades have been baseball and football. Baseball's story is well documented -- between steroids, altering the physical composition of the baseball, and the shrinking of the strike zone. In the case of the NFL, all of the offensive numbers you see are basically the result of rule changes that were deliberately aimed at enhancing passing statistics.

Something else to remember is that those New Jersey teams from the era you mentioned were much more offensively skilled than they ever get credit for. The team that lost to the Rangers in the 1994 Eastern Conference finals was #2 in the NHL in scoring -- trailing only the Red Wings. They won the Stanley Cup the next year in a shortened season with almost the same roster. The 1999-2000 Devils who won the Cup were also #2 in scoring (again, after the Red Wings), and the 2000-2001 team that lost to Colorado in the Stanley Cup finals actually led the NHL in goals scored.

Those great New Jersey teams were much closer in their composition to the Montreal teams of the 1970s than most hockey fans may realize. That shouldn't come as a surprise, considering how much of their coaching staff could trace their roots to those Montreal teams (Jacques Lemaire and Larry Robinson in particular). The Devils of the late 1990s are often mistakenly viewed as a low-scoring team simply because they never had any high-profile offensive stars. They got offensive production from all four forward lines, and rarely had any individual players score more than 40 goals.

26 posted on 04/24/2013 4:26:01 AM PDT by Alberta's Child ("I am the master of my fate ... I am the captain of my soul.")
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