Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Deanna Durbin, Plucky Movie Star of the Depression Era, Is Dead at 91
The New York Times ^ | April 30, 2013 | Aljean Harmetz

Posted on 04/30/2013 7:54:52 PM PDT by EveningStar

Deanna Durbin, who as a plucky child movie star with a sweet soprano voice charmed American audiences during the Depression and saved Universal Pictures from bankruptcy before she vanished from public view 64 years ago, has died, a fan club announced on Tuesday. She was 91.

In a newsletter, the Deanna Durbin Society said Ms. Durbin died “a few days ago,” quoting her son, Peter H. David, who thanked her admirers for respecting her privacy. No other details were given.

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Music/Entertainment; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: canada; deannadurbin; hollywood; obituary
Wikipedia
1 posted on 04/30/2013 7:54:52 PM PDT by EveningStar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Borges; DollyCali; Perdogg

ping


2 posted on 04/30/2013 7:55:30 PM PDT by EveningStar ("What color is the sky in your world?" -- Frasier Crane)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

One of her biggest fans was Winston Churchill.


3 posted on 04/30/2013 7:57:29 PM PDT by Hillarys Gate Cult (Liberals make unrealistic demands on reality and reality doesn't oblige them.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

What a sweetheart. RIP


4 posted on 04/30/2013 7:59:32 PM PDT by Huskrrrr
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

I never really cared for the “musical” genre in film that much. But three exceptions to this, which I did tend to enjoy, were the Astaire/Rogers films, the Busby Berkelely films, and the Deanna Durbin films.

Durbin made a lot of films for Universal, and virtually all of them are rather pleasant and amusing. Used to see them on the late-shows quite often in the 1970s. They don’t circulate too much anymore. Mainly because the prime outlet for old films nowadays is Turner Classics, and they don’t have the Universal/Paramount library.

She was one of the last living “stars” of the 1930s. Only a tiny few left now (Mickey Rooney, Olivia de Havilland, Luise Rainer, etc.)


5 posted on 04/30/2013 8:02:42 PM PDT by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

I expected a cold star picture on Wikipedia, not a va-vroom! Reminder of what today’s “talent” is lacking.


6 posted on 04/30/2013 8:03:51 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (Rome didn't fall in a day, either.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tanniker Smith

“Child”, not cold. Frakkin’ autocorrect.


7 posted on 04/30/2013 8:04:39 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (Rome didn't fall in a day, either.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar
Beautiful lady. They don't make them like this anymore. RIP
8 posted on 04/30/2013 8:06:23 PM PDT by mardi59 (IMPEACH OBAMA NOW!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

I didn’t know she was still alive(until recently, that is). RIP, Miss Durbin.


9 posted on 04/30/2013 8:10:54 PM PDT by ReformationFan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mardi59

How about wholesome? No botox or plastic surgery. Real people.


10 posted on 04/30/2013 8:11:36 PM PDT by Grams A (The Sun will rise in the East in the morning and God is still on his throne.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

Deanna Durbin - Un Bel Di (One Fine Day)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LB2OTEcRhBs


11 posted on 04/30/2013 8:19:39 PM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Grams A

All Hollywood has now are fake boobs, hairpieces, fake nails, liposuction, facelifts, padded rearends, nose jobs and lousy personalities.


12 posted on 04/30/2013 8:20:45 PM PDT by mardi59 (IMPEACH OBAMA NOW!!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

I loved how women stars looked in the 40’s. And the way they were lit and photographed in B&W. Pure glam!

They truly were stars


13 posted on 04/30/2013 8:21:57 PM PDT by llevrok (2013: America is in a cold civil war.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tanniker Smith

In high school I once pulled out a bound volume of Life magazines so I could look up the issue covering the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. One issue from November 1941 featured a photo of Deanna Durbin in her underwear playing a violin in the privacy of her bedroom. She was about twenty at the time. Va va voom!


14 posted on 04/30/2013 8:23:55 PM PDT by elcid1970 ("The Second Amendment is more important than Islam.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar; a fool in paradise

IBSWBM (In Before She Will be Missed!)


15 posted on 04/30/2013 8:25:19 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

RIP.


16 posted on 04/30/2013 8:28:49 PM PDT by fieldmarshaldj (Resist We Much)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar
angelic voice and scene (youtube). rest in peace. Silent Night.
17 posted on 04/30/2013 8:33:19 PM PDT by dadfly
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mardi59

Wow!

What a beautiful Dame...


18 posted on 04/30/2013 8:40:05 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

She was awfully cute. Loved her.


19 posted on 04/30/2013 8:42:48 PM PDT by Migraine
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

Amazingly talented and also very very cute and sweet.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=deanna+durbin&filters=long&lclk=long


20 posted on 04/30/2013 8:51:05 PM PDT by Bobalu (It is not obama we are fighting, it is the media.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: greene66

All that is wrong with the movie musical can be summed up in two words; Barbra Streisand.
From the Golddiggers and Big Broadcast to South Pacific and My Fair Lady, the art form was fine until those four horrid movies she made; Hello Dolly, Funny Girl, Funny Lady and Yentl.
Eccchh.


21 posted on 04/30/2013 9:08:16 PM PDT by steve8714 (Any homosexual man can marry any woman he wants. Just like any normal man.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: steve8714

I’m pretty sure I’ve hated every single “musical” from about the mid-1960s onward!


22 posted on 04/30/2013 9:16:39 PM PDT by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: steve8714

Yentl, what a freak show.


23 posted on 04/30/2013 9:28:08 PM PDT by Persevero (Homeschooling for Excellence since 1992)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: steve8714

‘Funny Girl’ was terrific. The first half anyway. Once the songs run out it’s downhill.


24 posted on 04/30/2013 9:52:55 PM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: greene66

Fiddler on the Roof? Cabaret? Oliver!?


25 posted on 04/30/2013 9:53:57 PM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Borges

Nope. Not my sort of thing. That whole ‘modern’ musical style. Too gay. I’ll take the Deanna Durbin films instead. Or, even a Monogram cheapie like “Swing Parade of 1946.” Or, even better, “The Big Broadcast” (1932), with Bing Crosby, the Boswell Sisters, Cab Calloway, and Arthur Tracy.


26 posted on 04/30/2013 10:03:32 PM PDT by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: dadfly

Thank you. That was great.


27 posted on 04/30/2013 10:17:04 PM PDT by MamaB
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

Former neighbor of W.C. Fields. IIRC he used to shoot at her swans when he heard her singing.


28 posted on 04/30/2013 10:36:19 PM PDT by TChad (Call them Oppressives, not Progressives)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: mardi59

You’re right.


29 posted on 04/30/2013 10:59:49 PM PDT by onyx (Please Support Free Republic - Donate Monthly! If you want on Sarah Palin's Ping List, Let Me know!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Revolting cat!

She can’t be missed. The story said she went into seclusion 64 years ago. Who misses someone who hasn’t made an appearance in 64 years and doesn’t even have her death announced until “a few days ago”. Sounds like she out-Garboed Garbo.


30 posted on 04/30/2013 11:32:39 PM PDT by OrangeHoof (Our economy won't heal until one particular black man is unemployed.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: llevrok

Same here.


31 posted on 05/01/2013 3:05:14 AM PDT by wally_bert (There are no winners in a game of losers. I'm Tommy Joyce, welcome to the Oriental Lounge.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: greene66

I like Footloose.
And the singing episode of Buffy.


32 posted on 05/01/2013 4:39:22 AM PDT by steve8714 (Any homosexual man can marry any woman he wants. Just like any normal man.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

The voice of an angel http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lT_b_MWrJQU Ave Maria brings tears to my eyes.


33 posted on 05/01/2013 6:08:02 AM PDT by ABN 505
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: greene66

Are you talking about stage or screen musicals? ‘Oliver!’ premiered on stage in 1960. Fiddler in 1964. The films were made later. I didn’t even mention all the Sondheim stage musicals which blow away the ones you mentioned.


34 posted on 05/01/2013 7:04:43 AM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Borges

Screen musicals. As a genre. I don’t really like the modern Broadway-esque approach of screen musicals, from the type of vocal stylistics to often the way the music is integrated into the plots. It does not appeal to me at all. I find such films invariably grating.

Older-style musicals? Yes. I like many of them. “42nd Street” and the Berkely films. Bing Crosby’s older Paramount movies, like “Waikiki Wedding” or “Anything Goes.” Early-40s films with wartime swing-band elements. Not quite as keen on MGM, but I do like “Singin’ in the Rain” and “An American in Paris.” The aforementioned Deanna Durbin films from Universal.

But by the mid-50s and into the 60s, probably starting with “Oklahoma,” musicals started getting too damn faggy. And I just don’t like the type of music.


35 posted on 05/01/2013 8:08:14 AM PDT by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: greene66

The best screen musicals were the ones that MGM made in the ‘40s and ‘50s. ‘Meet Me in St Louis’ ‘Singin in the Rain’, ‘The Band Wagon’. Stuff like ‘Oklahoma!’, Carousel, and South Pacific were overblown cinematic adaptations of great Broadway shows.


36 posted on 05/01/2013 8:32:12 AM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: greene66
Hey, Olivia DeHavilland's sister, Joan Fontaine is still alive and ;living in Carmel. (Olivia lives in France.)

I believe there are 5 actors from Gone With the Wind that are still alive. And one or two are older than DeHavilland.

37 posted on 05/01/2013 11:10:31 AM PDT by nickcarraway
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: OrangeHoof

She wasn’t a recluse, she just didn’t want to be in the industry anymore.


38 posted on 05/01/2013 11:18:30 AM PDT by nickcarraway
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: nickcarraway

Yep, there are still a few 30s film vets around, but the list is dwindling rapidly. Mary Carlisle (who I once met) is still living. I think Marsha Hunt is too. Adrian Booth, who was a leading-lady in b-westerns, goes back to the late-30s, and she’s still alive. Then there are the kid actors, including mega-star Shirley Temple.

And you’re right about Durbin. I never heard about her being a recluse. Just that she married a Frenchman, moved to France, and never really had any interest in anything Hollywood-oriented ever since.


39 posted on 05/01/2013 11:34:20 AM PDT by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: greene66

Carla Laemmle is also still alive. She is the niece of the founder of Universal Studios and had the first speaking lines in the 1930 film of Dracula with Lugosi.


40 posted on 05/01/2013 1:25:37 PM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Borges

Yes, that’s another one. Also kid actor Dickie Moore. I think Fay MacKenzie ‘might’ still alive, but I’m not sure. Not certain if Louise Currie or Anne Jeffries credits dip back to pre-1940, but they’re around. Also Herb Jeffries, the singer, made three or four of those low-budget, “all-colored cast” b-westerns.

Seems amazing. Not too many years back, there were slews of 1930s-era actors and actresses still around. Saw and met dozens of them. Even opened a car-door once for Maureen O’Sullivan. Ah, well.


41 posted on 05/01/2013 6:02:54 PM PDT by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

here singing was fantastic....!

so sorry to hear that.. i think she was Canadian

she sang a broadcast thanks to America for all the help in WW2.


42 posted on 05/01/2013 6:58:30 PM PDT by urtax$@work (The only kind of memorial is a Burning memorial !)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

A beautiful rendition of Danny Boy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j32Fnb_8Bv4


43 posted on 05/01/2013 10:40:55 PM PDT by Deo volente (God willing, America shall survive this Obamanation.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: greene66

This is a great source...

http://www.genarians.com/


44 posted on 05/02/2013 7:39:25 AM PDT by Borges
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Borges

Wow, that’s a nifty site. Lots of interesting info. Had no idea Richard Coogan, Danielle Darrieux, or Mike Road were still living. Plus, I thought Audrey Totter had passed away years ago. Glad to know I was wrong. And good to confirm Patricia Morison and Bea Wain are still around. John Calvert, too, who’s 102 this year.

And add Marjorie Lord to our surviving 1930s film vets list. She was leading lady in one of the last Wheeler and Woolsey films (although when I mentioned this to her when I saw her at a book signing, she didn’t seem to want to acknowledge it all that much!).


45 posted on 05/02/2013 8:15:30 AM PDT by greene66
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson