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Mountain Lion Tranquilized, Rescued From Aqueduct Near Santa Cruz
CBS Local ^ | May 16, 2013

Posted on 05/16/2013 5:41:12 PM PDT by nickcarraway

A young male mountain lion tranquilized and rescued after it was trapped for hours in an aqueduct near downtown Santa Cruz is being released into the wild today, a state Department of Fish and Wildlife spokeswoman said.

The cat was first seen around 7 a.m. Later in the morning, it became trapped in the Branciforte Creek aqueduct near Water Street and May Avenue, police said.

Wildlife rescue crews from the University of California at Santa Cruz Puma Project were able to tranquilize the animal and it was transported to the Marine Wildlife Veterinary Care and Research Center.

Staff from Moss Landing-based WildLife Emergency Services provided equipment for the rescue, including netting to block escape routes at the creek after they were alerted about the situation by Santa Cruz authorities around 8 a.m., group president Rebecca Dmytryk said.

A veterinarian from the Department of Fish and Wildlife was also at the scene, Mackey said.

A staff member from WildLife Emergency Services helped the veterinarian and police personnel move the tranquilized animal into a crate, Dmytryk said.

“We were all working for the good of the animal as well as the safety of the people,” Dmytryk said.

The mountain lion weighs about 100 pounds and is healthy and in “very good condition,” Mackey said.

Dmytryk said the young mountain lion was likely a few years old. The mountain lion was taken to the center around 1 p.m. and was set for released later Thursday—after the effects of the tranquilizer wore off—into an undisclosed area of the Santa Cruz Mountains, Mackey said.

No one was injured during the hours-long rescue effort, police said


TOPICS: Local News; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS:

Some video at site

Earlier thread:Mountain Lion Trapped in Downtown Santa Cruz Aqueduct

1 posted on 05/16/2013 5:41:12 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: JRandomFreeper; Carry_Okie; Vendome; fieldmarshaldj; Valpal1; ├čudda├čudd; Owl558; martin_fierro

I have no info on where to go if you want to adopt him...


2 posted on 05/16/2013 5:44:40 PM PDT by nickcarraway
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To: nickcarraway

Good to hear.

Dangerous, but beautiful animal.


3 posted on 05/16/2013 5:45:50 PM PDT by Las Vegas Ron (The government rejects the natural law because it is an obstacle to its control over us.)
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To: nickcarraway

So, wonder what did it cost for all of these necessary helpers?


4 posted on 05/16/2013 5:48:52 PM PDT by easternsky
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To: nickcarraway

They can kill all of the Great Whites they want, but I’m glad they spared this cat.


5 posted on 05/16/2013 5:49:13 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: nickcarraway
Oh yeah. I want to adopt an animal that I outweigh by about 12%. Only thing I've got on my side is opposable thumbs and firearms. I'm not even sure where my teef are.

I think he's going to have to be a catch and release. In Far-Far-Away. Austin works for me. Near the capitol.

/johnny

6 posted on 05/16/2013 5:50:13 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

In CA. Surprised no one tried to mount it when it was down. /s


7 posted on 05/16/2013 5:53:26 PM PDT by glyptol
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To: scripter

Santa Cruz ping


8 posted on 05/16/2013 5:54:46 PM PDT by latina4dubya (when i have money i buy books... if i have anything left, i buy 6-inch heels and a bottle of wine...)
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To: glyptol

Oh brother...


9 posted on 05/16/2013 5:56:10 PM PDT by latina4dubya (when i have money i buy books... if i have anything left, i buy 6-inch heels and a bottle of wine...)
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To: glyptol
Now that has 2 meanings.

If I mount a mountain lion that means my taxidermist made a boat payment and my lawyer's son is still in Harvard. And I have something dead to put on top of the piano to scare everlivincrapoutta my housecatz.

In California.... It could involve marriage.

/johnny

10 posted on 05/16/2013 5:57:28 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper
I think he's going to have to be a catch and release. In Far-Far-Away. Austin works for me. Near the capitol.

I was thinking in the Capitol building during an EPA funding debate.

11 posted on 05/16/2013 6:17:30 PM PDT by null and void (Republicans create the tools of opression, and the democrats gleefully use them!)
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To: JRandomFreeper; glyptol

I think glyptol was talking about catrimony...


12 posted on 05/16/2013 6:19:07 PM PDT by null and void (Republicans create the tools of opression, and the democrats gleefully use them!)
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To: JRandomFreeper
something...to scare everlivincrapoutta my housecatz.

Like this?

13 posted on 05/16/2013 6:24:16 PM PDT by null and void (Republicans create the tools of opression, and the democrats gleefully use them!)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Surprised they didn’t give the cat two ear-rings....and a MoonBeam Tattoo!!


14 posted on 05/16/2013 6:30:11 PM PDT by Osage Orange (Life is a bitch. If it was easy, we would call it a slut)
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To: nickcarraway

Yup, just what I figured, a yearling male chased out of his home turf and looking for food.


15 posted on 05/16/2013 6:35:17 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: null and void
Nah, my catz have been around on Jan 2nd.

A small lizard woudn't do it. A stuffed big cat... that freaks them out.

We live sorta harsh around here. They were with me when I did the mountain man thing. And the catz did the 'hunting chuckle' thing catz do when a 2000 lb bull wandered up onto the front porch. Took me a minute to clear my eyes and figure out it wasn't a mouse or a blue jay.

I bring parts of large dead critters into the house weekly. They expect that from me.

One of their own? Not so cool.

/johnny

16 posted on 05/16/2013 6:43:04 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: nickcarraway

Big deal. I’ve seen them in my backyard a mere 20 miles from
Beautiful downtown hartford Connecticut. Extremely dangerous.


17 posted on 05/16/2013 6:45:56 PM PDT by kneehurts
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To: skeeter; GladesGuru; EggsAckley; sasquatch
They can kill all of the Great Whites they want, but I’m glad they spared this cat.

You've just earned richly what you are about to get for that.

I'd not be at all surprised if you thought my neighborhood 'up in the mountains' was a great location for the release. After all, I'm bent over weeding for six months a year, so I probably wouldn't even notice it, until... So nice of your type to use our property to make yourselves feel better about having taken up so much prime land for your urban lifestyle.

About a year ago, my neighbor up the road had a 150# kittie casing his property. Seems kittie had a thing about hopping his eight foot fence and marking the ground outside his two-year-old's bedroom window. Pooped in a planter pot on his patio too. Yeah, it was a nice place to let your kid go out and play... before four urban counties passed Prop 192 over the objections of everybody else.

The kitties were here first? Oh really? No more so than where you live. My property was being used as a transit corridor for the Spanish Franciscans for fifty years before there even was a Los Gatos. I promise you: by 1880 there wasn't a cat for fifteen miles from here. Even as late as 1935, there was a town up here with a hundred cabins, a train station and a post office. The depression and State Highway 17 killed it.

If you want to BUY sufficient property that kittie can roam, go for it, but I hate to tell you that almost all of that is already taken and occupied. That's why kittie came to town in the first place, that and the fact that this has been such a dry spring there's very little water at higher elevations.

If the public wants large predators, they should be accountable for their habitat and well being. Instead, "our" agents at Fish and Game will put any landowner who chooses to defend his family or his animals under an inquisition costing as much as a college education.

NONE of this policy is good for mountain lions. In fact, the State is killing more cats than were ever allotted under legal hunting. Besides the fact that we now pay bureaucrats to do the hunting when hunters used to pay for the privilege, the only difference to the animals is that the cat has to be sufficiently stressed as to move into human abodes and cause a severe threat to life and or loss of property before DFG will issue a depredation permit (it's now DFW, but few will recognize it as such). Worse insofar as habitat is concerned that produces food for the prey these creatures eat (you know, the base of the food chain), what we have now is over-predation, which is causing the loss of herbivores that eat the vegetation that has become severely overgrown because "the public" won't let us burn it periodically as it has been for thousands of years. That means no forbs, which are the feedstock for the entire system. Native annual forbs are going extinct for lack of disturbance and succession run amok.

That's a very destructive sentiment you have there to the very animals you claim to care about.

18 posted on 05/16/2013 7:05:03 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: nickcarraway

He’s be a nice addition to the White House if he wasn’t left unfed for a few days before arrival.


19 posted on 05/16/2013 7:08:35 PM PDT by piasa (Attitude adjustments offered here free of charge)
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To: Carry_Okie
kittie came to town

You've just given me an idea for a children's book.

20 posted on 05/16/2013 7:11:28 PM PDT by thecodont
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To: Carry_Okie; clamper1797; EggsAckley; expat_brit; hedgetrimmer; Jack Black; jahp; Regulator; ...
CЯUZIO
>> PING <<
Send FReepmail if you want on/off the SANTA CЯUZ COUNTY CA ping list
Click for Santa Cruz, California Forecast
This is why we can't have nice things
The List of Ping Lists

21 posted on 05/16/2013 7:34:34 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: nickcarraway

Sorry, I thought somebody said there was a cougar trapped in a culvert...

22 posted on 05/16/2013 8:23:35 PM PDT by stormer
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To: stormer
Looks like that cougar is into culvert operations.
23 posted on 05/16/2013 8:30:48 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: Carry_Okie

I live in the hills in Los Gatos as well.


24 posted on 05/17/2013 5:19:03 AM PDT by skeeter
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To: Carry_Okie
bent over weeding

Nothing like that position and the feeling that eyes are upon you to tweak the hair on the back of your neck.
25 posted on 05/17/2013 7:05:09 AM PDT by sasquatch
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To: sasquatch; skeeter
Nothing like that position and the feeling that eyes are upon you to tweak the hair on the back of your neck.

.357, laser sights, and chest holster... with dog for early warning. I whisper about goodies once in a while to make sure she's paying attention.

Skeeter, aside from your dubious dodge (the City of Los Gatos has lots of hills and cats have been seen on the Bay side of El Camino Real), yours is the attitude of a townie, the sentiments proffered by the likes of Neil Wiley. They do not represent the attitude of people who work the land daily in the "wildlife corridors" the almighty State has set aside for you (including my land). Unfortunately, that urban attitude is doing real damage to the animals, the land, and the people who maintain it.

When Juan Crespi came north with the Portola expedition in 1769, his diary did not mention a single mountain lion. In fact, the only animals that the Indians had not nearly obliterated were grizzly bears and coyotes. The game was so sparse that the expedition was forced to slaughter their mules to stay alive. Whole regions were burned annually. Crespi recounted verdant fields of what he didn't know were crops.

Starr King recorded his impressions of the Bay Area in 1851:

"Here they have flowers in May, not shy, but rampant, as if nothing else had the right to be; flowers by the acre, flowers by the square mile, flowers as the visible carpet of an immense mountain wall. You can gather them in clumps, a dozen varieties in one pull…. Imagine yourself looking across a hundred acres of wild meadow, stretching to the base of hills nearly two thousand feet high—the whole expanse swarming with little straw-colored wild sun-flowers, orange poppies, squadrons of purple beauties, battalions of pink…. This is what I saw on the road to San Mateo.” Those were the results of the habitat management regimen to which the entire botanical system had become accustomed for 10,000 years. We have changed it completely, and we don't know what we are doing.

We stopped the burning and eventually blew off hunting. Lands that were long dominated by annual forbs succeeded rapidly to grasslands, chaparral, and then forests. I have photos from the 1920s of our valley. It was a grassland with sparse oaks (that probably weren't there when the Indians had it because there is no stone in that area for making acorn flour). Today, other than a single hay field, it is all impacted forest. These stands are so dense that there is little to no groundcover. What little remains of the chaparral that once fed the birds is decadent.

Remember the Lexington fire?

In the presence of so many exotic plant species, each will expand its range after successive fires. Exotic brush will replace the native. Exotic grasses are so dominant that the largest remaining stand of undisturbed native grass in the Bay Area is less than an acre. A system that once consisted of fruit-bearing shrubs and leafy forbs will then be thistles, annual grasses, and hard seed coat weeds like broom (in other words, it will look like the dried-out disaster that is the Diablo Range). That process is putting a food desert in the middle of the Pacific flyway. The soils are so depleted of phosphorus and trace minerals that they cannot support the original vegetation.

Now I am NOT saying the land must be restored to its condition as managed by the "natives." We don't know how to do that anyway nor do we even know in detail how the system was once configured over a region as varietal as this. I am saying that we do need to restore breeding samples of those systems that once thrived here, else we will lose the genetic building blocks with which to optimize how we choose to make it work. If that happens, will we never learn what might have been made of it. If you are at all religious, it's that Genesis 1:28 thingy, you know, the first command G_d gave to humankind.

The damage can be reversed, but it is a lot of work with today's technologies. Our land had but 60 species of plants when we got here. It was dominated by broom, eucalyptus, acacia, and a dying oak madrone woodland. After 25 years of arduous labor, we have 371 plant species, five habitat types in various successional stages, and the purest native grasslands to be found anywhere in California. When the university professors come here, they are shocked, believing it could not be done.

I did it for your liberty, to take on an environmental movement that is destroying this State, economically, politically, and environmentally. The sentiment you expressed is aligned with that tyrannical disease perfectly, one that is destroying habitat while taking property value without compensation. It puts my life, my children, and my animals at needless risk, but it's worse than that.

When you and I were kids, our parents could tell us, "Go out and play." We could explore the land in relative safety, learning independence and self reliance. Today, we raise a generation to which we can no longer offer that blessing. No, we need to watch over them every minute. Now, just substitute parents with government and you see what that is doing.

Humans are the apex predator in every habitat system, worldwide. We are the only creature on earth with the prospective intelligence to increase the productivity of the land. We have abandoned that role, believing that somehow "Nature" is self-optimizing. It isn't. It has been habituated to human management for millennia and doesn't "know" what to do when we abandon that responsibility. We don't get a choice about maintaining land; it must be done, not just for fire, but for wildlife and our children. If you don't want periodic fires, that work must be done by people, whether by themselves or with animals. It is expensive, difficult, and intellectually demanding work. Unless it is done we will lose the foundations of the bacterial, fungal, and botanical symbioses that grow our food. They don't survive on ammonia. Even organic farming is relatively ignorant of the need for a pastoral rotation. It is only a matter of time. People usually don't prefer to be food or lose their animals just so that you can feel better about what is in reality a completely unbalanced wildlife system.

26 posted on 05/17/2013 8:40:36 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: Carry_Okie
Jeez louis CO, all I said was I'm glad they didn't shoot the cat.

Do all the folks on the Santa Cruz side of the mountains feel like you do?

27 posted on 05/17/2013 10:09:37 AM PDT by skeeter
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To: skeeter
Jeez louis CO, all I said was I'm glad they didn't shoot the cat.

That's right. It shows how ignorant you are on the topic.

Do all the folks on the Santa Cruz side of the mountains feel like you do?

No. Most of them are suburban wannabes. They want the pleasures of the wild but won't do what it takes to support it. They suffer from an urban myth, that "Nature takes care of itself." The belief is demonstrably false.

Try taking your "he must be crazy" blinkers off and read the post for what it says.

28 posted on 05/17/2013 11:25:12 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: Carry_Okie

Placemark for excellent and informative comments.


29 posted on 05/18/2013 11:56:07 AM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: little jeremiah
For over a decade I have been trying to teach conservatives that we can own the environmental debate.

The usual response is to cower.

30 posted on 05/18/2013 2:41:01 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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