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Windows 8.1: Five Hopeful Signs
Information Week ^ | 05/19/2013 | Michael Endler

Posted on 05/19/2013 12:58:39 PM PDT by SeekAndFind

Research firm Forrester says IT isn't interested in Windows 8, and that the platform's success relies on consumers and BYOD. Given that consumers aren't exactly embracing the new OS, Win8's prospects are easy to dismiss -- so much so that Frank X. Shaw, Redmond's VP of corporate communications, recently felt compelled to reprimand the media for its emphatically bleak appraisal of his company's plight.

But here's the thing: Shaw could be right. Windows 8's consumer appeal is about to get a major upgrade.

An important note: this prediction presupposes that the OS's usability issues are addressed in Windows 8.1, a free update, formerly known as Windows Blue, expected to be revealed in June.

There's been some doublespeak from Microsoft on the usability point. Redmond executives have claimed that customer feedback informed Blue's development -- but they've also defended Win8's Live Tile start screen, which has been a significant driver of user criticism. There's a fine line between upholding one's convictions and alienating one's fans. Win 8.1 looks like it will land on the right side of that line -- but I'll come back to that later.

First, here are five reasons things are looking up for Windows 8.

1. New Intel Chips, Better Battery Life

Intel's Haswell core chips should be shipping inside Windows 8.1 devices by this fall. If you found the Surface Pro somewhat attractive but were deterred by its poor battery life and modest i5 processor -- your time is coming. Haswell is expected to deliver major improvements in power management, which means designers have more flexibility to balance CPU power and battery life. The result should be Win8 tablets and Ultrabooks that function like high-end laptops but can run all day on a single battery charge. Intel's chips are also expected to facilitate thinner, lighter form factors, and to deliver improved graphics performance -- perfect for the high-density screens that will be common on the next round of high-end, Surface Pro-like machines.

Intel's Bay Trail Atom processors, meanwhile, won't be on the market until later this year. But the new mobile-oriented chips are expected to substantially improve the graphics performance and central processing muscle of Atom-based Windows 8 tablets. Intel says the new processors are twice as powerful as the current ones, and Intel is clearly looking to challenge ARM, the chip of choice for smartphones and tablets. If Bay Trail lives up to its promise, it will enable the lightest and most portable of tablets to not only run the full version of Windows 8, but also, and more importantly, do so without a hitch. In a space dominated by cheap Android tablets and the iPad Mini, the ability to run Microsoft Office and legacy x86 apps could be a major differentiator.

2. Lower Prices

For many users, the first wave of Windows 8 devices was prohibitively expensive. The next wave, however, should offer options to fit all budgets. Intel has stated that Haswell-based Ultrabooks should reach the $600 price point. There will be more expensive options too. But given the improvements the new chips should facilitate, Intel's promise means that devices with more raw processing power and better battery life than the Surface Pro will soon cost only a little more than much-ignored, and x86-incompatible, Surface RT.

Atom-based Windows 8 tablets, meanwhile, could be much cheaper. The prospect of $1,000 Win8 Ultrabooks didn't entice many people -- but $300 for an extremely thin tablet that can capably run Microsoft Office, Photoshop, Angry Birds and most anything else? That could take a bite out of the iPad Mini's sales.

Windows 8 struggled partially due to a lack of elegance in the new interface. But a lot of that bad buzz came from people who ran the OS without a touchscreen. Some of these Win8 installations involved new licenses installed on old machines, which gain little value, if any, from the new UI. But OEMs exacerbated this problem when, heading into last winter, they managed to release only a handful of touch-enabled options.

By the time this year's back-to-school and holiday seasons roll around, store shelves should not only feature a great abundance of touch-oriented Windows 8 devices but also a greater diversity of form factors. This variety will include some novel ideas, such as 30-inch hybrid tablets that can be docked like a desktop but also laid flat to create a table display. But the entrance of mini-tablets is probably the most notable development.

As mentioned above, these devices -- thanks to not only their ability to offer legitimate productivity tools in a consumer-friendly tablet but also their low prices -- could be enormously popular. Microsoft might even debut a 7-inch Surface model as soon as this summer.

4. Windows 8.1's UI Refinements

Windows 8.1's biggest hurdle will be addressing core usability concerns -- more on that below. Aside from this point, though, the update will -- based on information gleaned from leaked Windows Blue builds -- deliver a more refined version of the Metro interface. Many of the tweaks, such as the ability to resize and customize Live Tile sizes, are small but welcome. Others, such as an improved Snap Views function that allows up to four Metro apps to be displayed simultaneously, are more functional. Other changes include deeper Sky Drive integration, Internet Explorer 11 and support for new touch gestures.

Nothing earth-shattering has come to light, but the numerous small improvements should contribute to a smoother, more cohesive user experience. Control panel tweaks aren't exciting, for example, but because Windows 8 currently forces users to jump between the Metro and desktop interfaces to access these controls, it's significant that Windows Blue will likely make these tools easier to access from either environment. It's not flashy -- but it makes the user experience significantly less frustrating.

To be fair, "less frustrating" doesn't exactly equal iOS-level user delight. But Windows 8 is still a new, radically different model, and it will take Microsoft some time to figure things out. Plus, to gain market share, Windows 8.1 doesn't need to be great. It just needs to be good enough.

Microsoft products are still an entrenched part of most businesses. It's one thing for a BYOD employee to use Google Apps and an iPad because he doesn't want to spend $1,000 on a Surface Pro that has lousy battery life, is relatively heavy and features an aggravating interface. It's another thing, though, to pay $300 or $400 for great battery life, complete compatibility with the office, a light form factor and a decent tablet UI that does most things it's supposed to do. If Win 8.1 is expected to disrupt the market, it's bound to disappoint. But if it's meant to lead to organic growth that could lead to future gains, then "good enough" could actually work -- at least until Google, Samsung or Apple does something to move the mobile goal posts.

5. Better Apps

The native Windows 8 apps weren't great, but Microsoft has already released updates to improve them, and Blue is expected to bring new alarm, sound recorder, movie and calculator apps.

It's unclear how useful these new entries will be, but Microsoft has also been actively encouraging developers to join the Win8 fold, and the effort has been paying off. The platform now boasts more than 73,000 apps, and developer activity, after trailing off during the first three months of the year, is nearly as high as it was at launch. Microsoft has also been building an elite team to develop next-gen apps that span the entire Windows ecosystem.

Win 8.1 won't change the fact that Metro still has only about one-tenth the number of apps that iOS has. Still, Redmond's new OS now has enough apps to compete; it can't do everything, but the Windows Store no longer resembles a bare cupboard.

But It All Hinges On Usability

As Windows 8's defenders point out, the OS is usable -- as long as you endure a short learning curve. The problem is, many users gave Metro only a brief look and dismissed Win8 without a second thought. To a certain segment of users, a tablet that can access x86 apps is a dream come true. But iPads satisfy most people's most common needs, and when they require something heavier, most of them still have a computer. Windows 8's merits, for many of these users, did not make learning the new OS worthwhile.

To be fair, some of this adoption hesitancy has to do with cost, and Microsoft and its partners are about to address that. But it's clear, fair or not, that the UI hurdle needs to be removed. That doesn't mean Redmond should kill Metro, but it means the devices need to be engaging as soon as users pick them up.

The extent to which Microsoft understands this is unclear. On the one hand, Windows CMO and CFO Tami Reller has conceded that the "learning curve" imposed by the new Live Tiles UI is "real and needs to be addressed."

But Windows chief Julie Larson-Green has defended the Live Tile start screen as a "dramatic improvement" over the familiar start menu it replaces. Microsoft is "principled ... but stubborn" about the new interface, she said, even while conceding that a resurrected start menu "might be helpful" to some users. Muddying the waters further, she also said that Windows 8.1 won't deliver "major changes," and that "some things" -- presumably, the stream of Win Blue rumors that had been steadily flowing for months -- "are wildly inaccurately reported."

Speaking of those rumors, with Windows Blue, users will likely gain the option to boot directly to the desktop interface, rather than being force-fed the Live Tiles start screen every time they start their machines. Window 8.1 might also feature a restored start menu, but rather than functioning like its Windows 7-equivalent, it's rumored to be a Live Tiles shortcut. There's also been talk of search charm enhancements intended to wean users of their old-UI dependencies, and better integration of tutorials and help functions. Whether any of these changes actually materialize remains to be seen.

But whatever Microsoft does, it must make the OS easier to use. If the company does so, watch out. Based on the five factors above, the conditions are right for Microsoft's consumer market share to jump.

Does this mean the next Surface will catapult to iPad-like sales, or that Windows 8 is about to explode the way Android did in 2012? No. But an important shift is nonetheless primed to occur. At launch, Windows 8 presented users with one very important reason to buy: a tablet UI and legacy applications, all in one device. Unfortunately, it also gave users many reasons not to buy: a counterintuitive UI, costly devices, uninspired native apps, lackluster app library, poor battery life, and so on.

Now, most of the deterrents have been eliminated. Ease of use is the big one that remains.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: microsoft; tablet; thistimeforsure; windows8
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1 posted on 05/19/2013 12:58:39 PM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

Missed Hopeful sign Number 3:

3. More Touchscreens, Form Factors, Sizes

Windows 8 struggled partially due to a lack of elegance in the new interface. But a lot of that bad buzz came from people who ran the OS without a touchscreen. Some of these Win8 installations involved new licenses installed on old machines, which gain little value, if any, from the new UI. But OEMs exacerbated this problem when, heading into last winter, they managed to release only a handful of touch-enabled options.

By the time this year’s back-to-school and holiday seasons roll around, store shelves should not only feature a great abundance of touch-oriented Windows 8 devices but also a greater diversity of form factors. This variety will include some novel ideas, such as 30-inch hybrid tablets that can be docked like a desktop but also laid flat to create a table display. But the entrance of mini-tablets is probably the most notable development.

As mentioned above, these devices — thanks to not only their ability to offer legitimate productivity tools in a consumer-friendly tablet but also their low prices — could be enormously popular. Microsoft might even debut a 7-inch Surface model as soon as this summer.


2 posted on 05/19/2013 1:02:48 PM PDT by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

They sold 100 million copies (insert stupid remark about how all of them are unused), obviously consumers have “rejected” it. /s

But don’t let that get in the way of the average tech “journalist” still trying to push the group-think.


3 posted on 05/19/2013 1:03:32 PM PDT by VanDeKoik
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To: SeekAndFind
Thanks for this. I am not a WinFan but I appreciate your posts regarding Windows.

I almost don't come to them because of the childish comments from both sides. (Mac vs. Windows)

I am not saying Windows is great or better than Mac but Windows does what it does okay.

I've tried Ubuntu on an old box and it worked great. But, I bought an HP box just before Christmas and it has W8 and I kind of like it. The box was cheap - under $300 and has a quad core AMD, 8 Gb of memory and a Tb hard drive. Hard to beat that...

4 posted on 05/19/2013 1:04:47 PM PDT by raybbr (People who still support Obama are either a Marxist or a moron. No, they are both.)
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To: VanDeKoik

Sorry, but as a software developer, you will have a hard time convincing me that it’s not rubbish. I have all Mac/iOS hardware personally, and am a Linux/Mac/iOS developer professionally. Windows flat sucks.


5 posted on 05/19/2013 1:05:45 PM PDT by dinodino
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To: SeekAndFind

Research firm Forrester says IT isn’t interested in Windows 8,
That is bull.
Windows 7 is already old in its life cycle and Windows 8 with HTML5 is a future platform as well as present. My firm has no choice but to go with 8 then adapt to IE11 when 8.1 comes out. Not just that we have no choice but the win8 Kernel runs MUCH better on all our platforms than XP.


6 posted on 05/19/2013 1:07:29 PM PDT by omega4179
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To: SeekAndFind
My wife bought a new laptop that had the WIndows 8 garbage pile loaded into it. We've had three different IT service techs work on it and it is still garbage.

Cant get emial
won't stay on page
times itself out
brings frustration to every small function

We have just learned of a company that specializes in scrubbing Windows 8 so that computers can function normally and interface with all the other existing systems of the world. We will be going back to XP on this machine asap.

7 posted on 05/19/2013 1:07:47 PM PDT by Baynative (Lord, keep one hand on my shoulder and the other over my mouth.)
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To: VanDeKoik

probably off of his Droid.


8 posted on 05/19/2013 1:07:58 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas is a state of mind - Steinbeck)
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To: Baynative

Why not 7? 7 is better than XP.


9 posted on 05/19/2013 1:08:26 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas is a state of mind - Steinbeck)
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To: SeekAndFind
I'm very happy with 7 on both my laptop and desktop.I foresee being happy with it for many years to come.I even have an old clunker desktop running XP Professional that still runs OK.
10 posted on 05/19/2013 1:08:27 PM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Leno Was Right,They *Are* Undocumented Democrats!)
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To: SeekAndFind

Wifey is open to a new laptop.. I reckun Blue may be on the horizon.. oh well,, as long as they stay off my tablet, OK. Ya see the price of putters these days. Wow


11 posted on 05/19/2013 1:08:43 PM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: raybbr

I was in Unix long before windows grabbed the lead.. haven’t dabbled in Linux,,yet. Nice to have options.


12 posted on 05/19/2013 1:11:14 PM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: Gay State Conservative

I got me a win95 osr2 Sony, beautiful tube, no USB , for sale .. cheap, also a Mac pluck, 10 mb drive, system OS 6.0! has some neat old games..

Other than that, the cycle is most stuff is obsolete in 2 years or less, recycle:-)


13 posted on 05/19/2013 1:15:42 PM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: dinodino

“Sorry, but as a software developer, you will have a hard time convincing me that it’s not rubbish. I have all Mac/iOS hardware personally, and am a Linux/Mac/iOS developer professionally. Windows flat sucks.”

I guess the simple answer is: So? You dont use it out of choice.

I dont use Macs or Linux because I think they flat suck as well*. Since I value my opinion because I’m obviously more “important”, that must mean they do?

I use 8, really enjoy it. Too bad a segment of the internet is too stuck on another platform to actually understand that.

*dont really.


14 posted on 05/19/2013 1:15:45 PM PDT by VanDeKoik
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Uhh

Pluck = plus

Dang kebd bounce


15 posted on 05/19/2013 1:17:19 PM PDT by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: SeekAndFind

Windows Blue (Screen Of Death)


16 posted on 05/19/2013 1:19:02 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (I can neither confirm or deny that; even if I could, I couldn't - it's classified.)
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To: Secret Agent Man

6 months in, so far zero BSODs on win7. Vista I went a good 2 years without a BSOD.


17 posted on 05/19/2013 1:21:11 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas is a state of mind - Steinbeck)
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To: SeekAndFind

A good way to avoid the windows nightmare is get a Mac..:)


18 posted on 05/19/2013 1:21:48 PM PDT by cardinal4 (Skip impeachment and move straight to deportation..)
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To: SeekAndFind

Bookmark.


19 posted on 05/19/2013 1:32:00 PM PDT by The Cajun (Sarah Palin, Mark Levin......Nuff said.)
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To: SeekAndFind

All the folks that run WIN7, and have all their icons for everything on the Desktop, will never use WIN8, because of it’s McDonald’s French Fry Order look.

They have read the reports, or heard it from thier kids, that WIN8 disabled all those icons, or put them ‘in some damn tray I have to go find’.

As I see it, WIN7 is what XP could have been, and WIN8 is all the stuff they had to take off Vista, for that platform to do ‘something or other’.


20 posted on 05/19/2013 1:32:19 PM PDT by Terry L Smith
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To: SeekAndFind

“Windows 8 is still a new, radically different model”

No it’s not. It’s simply a poorly executed touch interface implemented on desktop PCs that retreats to a Win 7 interface when you have to do real work — and not spin on top of tables while you exchange screens with other useless 20 somethings.

They brought nothing to the UI of innovaiton. They fixed security holes. They presented more hooks to keep users ‘trapped’ by Office and Exchange.

the rest is CRAPOLA.

IMHO.


21 posted on 05/19/2013 1:33:52 PM PDT by Blueflag (Res ipsa loquitur: non vehere est inermus)
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To: SeekAndFind

Lacks elegance? Not exciting?

The touchscreen concept may be fine for checking email and tweeting to other twits, but it does not lend itself to computer applications.

But, then, I consider texting a giant step backward.


22 posted on 05/19/2013 1:36:09 PM PDT by TomGuy
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To: SeekAndFind

The mistake is the belief that one OS can fit all devices.


23 posted on 05/19/2013 1:37:49 PM PDT by NoLibZone (None here can be puzzled by why Jews walked into the cars so quietly- we are walking up the planks.)
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To: VanDeKoik

I do as well and like it. Much more stable than prior versions of Windows. I just use a tile to go to the desktop and use it from there.


24 posted on 05/19/2013 1:44:41 PM PDT by illiac (If we don't change directions soon, we'll get where we're going)
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To: JCBreckenridge

I have 4 upper-end HP machines running Win-7 Pro since ‘09, and not a glitch or BSOD, yet. Win-8? No thanks. Ever.


25 posted on 05/19/2013 1:47:28 PM PDT by carriage_hill (AR-10s & AR-15s are the Muskets of the 21st Century. Free men need not ask permission.)
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To: SeekAndFind

The problem with Windows 8 is that IT TOTALLY CHANGES the user interface into something you don’t know and is not easily understandable.

I lost almost a month of productivity on this piece o’ crapware, until I found a way to effectively remove it by installing an application that mimics the old stat menu.

Something as simple as bring up a file explorer to get to a folder containing your documents was impossibly to find.

I don’t use a computer to make videos and sound recording. I use it to do work, and nothing worked anymore.


26 posted on 05/19/2013 1:50:29 PM PDT by Mr. K (There are lies, damned lies, statistics, and democrat talking points.)
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To: omega4179

I just got done moving 1800 workstations to Windows 7. It was a year and half project in total, from application upgrades/readiness to actual deployment. We don’t plan on upgrading to anything else anytime soon. :-)
Besides, Windows XP loses support in 2014 so I don’t anticapte the same thing happening to 7 anytime soon.


27 posted on 05/19/2013 1:55:58 PM PDT by miliantnutcase
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To: VanDeKoik

I’m not so sure. I’ve read that 1 billion computers run windoze. I don’t know if that number is accurate, but let’s assume it is...

Sales of 100,000 units of Windoze 8 [code name: McDonald’s Cash Register 1.0] / 1,000,000,000 [Windoze system computers that could upgrade] = 0.0001

This does not seem like a home run... but then I don’t run a major corporation - or use windoze


28 posted on 05/19/2013 2:01:30 PM PDT by aMorePerfectUnion (Gone rogue, gone Galt, gone international, gone independent. Gone.)
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To: Mr. K

” Something as simple as bring up a file explorer to get to a folder containing your documents was impossibly to find.”

I just tried to find the file explorer
Windows key took me to the start page and I typed the letter f and it was right there on top. Pretty easy actually.


29 posted on 05/19/2013 2:08:31 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (President Obma; The Slumlord of the Rentseekers)
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin

Another quick way to the file explorer is run your mouse cursor to the lower left corner and right click. A menu comes up with all sorts of good stuff including the file explorer.


30 posted on 05/19/2013 2:14:01 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (President Obma; The Slumlord of the Rentseekers)
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To: Baynative

Make sure you can get xp drivers for all your hardware first.


31 posted on 05/19/2013 2:16:30 PM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: Baynative
7 is what we have, my mistake. That shows my lack of nerdness.
BTW- we went through the cesspool called Windows 8 to try to update the upgrades that may have been missed because it will not communicate with our email server. There was an update from last Tuesday that we missed so we closed all the open programs like it says and gave it a go. The computer went blank, shut down and will not restart.

I'm mad that I didn't listen to my son and go with Mac - we thought it would be too hard to learn - LOL

32 posted on 05/19/2013 2:16:55 PM PDT by Baynative (Lord, keep one hand on my shoulder and the other over my mouth.)
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To: aMorePerfectUnion

1) Yes it is over a billion. But there is no forced mechanism to upgrade a PC. As you can see here, there are some people that stupidly pride themselves on running a 11-year-old copy of XP. Why is it assumed that the full complement of Windows machine are EXPECTED to be running 8? All Macs don’t run the latest version nor do all people that use Ubuntu.

Yet 100,000,000 of a billion is “bad”?

2) 100,000 units?


33 posted on 05/19/2013 2:17:35 PM PDT by VanDeKoik
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To: Lurkina.n.Learnin

“I just tried to find the file explorer
Windows key took me to the start page and I typed the letter f and it was right there on top. Pretty easy actually.”

You have to realize that these guys can easily get this. They are adults.

They just dont want to have to learn anything, and think Microsoft owes them a static OS forever...or until they stop being lazy.

Eventually they will either learn because their company moves on, or they will be fired because someone else took the time to do more than sit and complain.


34 posted on 05/19/2013 2:22:40 PM PDT by VanDeKoik
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To: SeekAndFind

35 posted on 05/19/2013 2:25:30 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: VanDeKoik

You talk like someone who is 15 years old. Did you know that?


36 posted on 05/19/2013 2:28:00 PM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: Kirkwood

When it comes to Windows 8 (An OS that I’ve used everyday for months) it is literally like listening to 15-year-olds sqwak about how literally inept they are at using it.

People that cant read, cant think, and yet call themselves IT pros or veteran PC users yet seem to have the grasp of technology that reminds you of someone that never has even used a computer in their life, but then go on about getting a Mac or using Linux, which are OSs that they will equally have to learn how to use, dont work anything like XP or 7, and will confront them with issues and problems, without ever grasping the irony.

Never mind those people running XP or 2000 or 98. I mean what do those people even represent? It’s like hearing a guy with a 13-inch BW TV hooked up to a VCR tell you that a DVR attached to a 60-inch HDTV is silly and a waste.

It is a display of absurdity masked as serious observation.

-Wont learn how to use the Start Screen = Windows 8 fault.

-PC you bought is full of crapware from the OEM = Windows 8 fault

- My PC doesnt have a touchscreen? Windows 8 is therefore completely “unusable”.

-Printer company wont make new drivers? Windows 8 fault.

-Update you applied to you computer, which works fine for most everyone else, causes some issue with you = Windows 8 fault.

It seems like the topic of Windows 8 is where usual conservative logic and rationality goes to die and people adopt the the method of thinking from the Daily Kos.


37 posted on 05/19/2013 2:44:01 PM PDT by VanDeKoik
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To: Kirkwood

Does it make you jealous that a 15 year old has a better computer?


38 posted on 05/19/2013 2:49:36 PM PDT by JCBreckenridge (Texas is a state of mind - Steinbeck)
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To: FReepers

Click The Pic To Donate

Support FR, Donate Monthly If You Can

39 posted on 05/19/2013 2:50:58 PM PDT by DJ MacWoW (My faith and politics cannot be separated)
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To: VanDeKoik

Eagerly awaiting your technical points defending the Windows 8 kernel as superior to the Linux kernel or Mac OSX.


40 posted on 05/19/2013 3:12:03 PM PDT by dinodino
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To: dinodino

Let me direct you back to the land of 99.99999999999% of computer users who could not care less about the insignificant to their lives differences between kernels.


41 posted on 05/19/2013 3:14:17 PM PDT by VanDeKoik
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To: All
I have a new laptop with Windows 8 and can not be more frustrated.

No matter what I do it will not remember user IDs or passwords for web site. I have selected what should be selected and still - nothing. It asked if I wanted to remember passwords for a few sites but never did.

Viewing photos is a PIA, watching movie clips is a PIA and trying to shut down the damn thing - PIA.

Listing items on ebay is a disaster when you try to upload photos. Each time you select a photo you are brought back to some location other than where your photos are located. So, if I am selecting photos from a file named ‘ ebay ‘ in the pictures library I have to dig through everything to get back to the file for each photo I upload.

Downloaded Chrome, which partially fixed a few problems.

Really, whomever came up with this can take a long walk off a short dock. I can not stand this damned thing.

42 posted on 05/19/2013 3:15:59 PM PDT by warsaw44
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To: VanDeKoik

“Yet 100,000,000 of a billion is “bad”?”

I’d say so, assuming MSFT is in business to make a profit by reselling products to its customers. Compare the development cost to the net profit. As such, I would call it a lemon.

“Why is it assumed that the full complement of Windows machine are EXPECTED to be running 8?”

I would expect at least 10% to upgrade to a new, worthwhile product. Perhaps they saw no value to the upgrade. Or perhaps they were turned off by the McDonald’s Cash Register Interface approach. Who knows why. We only know they said, “no”. Maybe MSFT can salvage they development cost in the fix they are going to give away for free to victims.


43 posted on 05/19/2013 3:24:04 PM PDT by aMorePerfectUnion (Gone rogue, gone Galt, gone international, gone independent. Gone.)
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To: JCBreckenridge

He just made me laugh. Reminds me of a kid trying to talk like an adult. LOL


44 posted on 05/19/2013 3:33:50 PM PDT by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: Baynative

Baynative,

We have Win 8 on two 4 month old HP desktops.

Can’t get email? What does that mean? We both use Microsoft Outlook and Hotmail for emails. Never have had a problem with either one. If sounds like you have not set up your incoming and outgoing email POP settings.

Won’t stay on page? What does that even mean? The only time our PCs move to a different page is when we execute a command.

Times itself out? If you mean that the PC goes “dark” as a result of power savings settings, why not just simply change the settings so it stays on longer, or it never goes “dark”. Plus, when it does go dark for lack of use, all you have to do is move the mouse.

Brings frustration to every small function? We both have found Win 8 easy to learn and work with. If you want the Win XP or 7 Start page, all you have to do is click on the bottom left icon, AKA Charm, and you have a page that can be set up to look like the former start page with all of your commonly used program icons at the bottom of the page.


45 posted on 05/19/2013 4:40:01 PM PDT by CdMGuy
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To: SeekAndFind

I learned to love windows 8.

Takes 60 seconds to install “classic shell”.

Instantly solved all my usability problems.

Gave me the same old windows 7 interface!

http://www.classicshell.net/


46 posted on 05/19/2013 5:08:34 PM PDT by Mount Athos (A Giant luxury mega-mansion for Gore, a Government Green EcoShack made of poo for you)
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To: VanDeKoik

...and allow me to direct you back to the land of people who just want their software/hardware ecosystem to work. A friend whom I converted to Mac came over today and, out of the blue, commented how much easier his life was now that he wasn’t spending time each week maintaining Windows. No joke.


47 posted on 05/19/2013 6:47:17 PM PDT by dinodino
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To: Terry L Smith

Not quite right, with a little work, I got Win 8 working and acting pretty much the same as Win 7. Not a ringing endorsement for Win 8 I will grant you but not quite as bad as what you are describing.


48 posted on 05/19/2013 7:12:24 PM PDT by dangerdoc (see post #6)
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To: Mr. K

Windows 8 would not install on my PC running Windows 7.

Or to be more precise.

It took two hours and installed itself.
Then proclaimed “I cannot run on this hardware”
Then took two more hours to erase itself.
Then claimed my Windows 7 was not authorized version.
Then it took several more hours to run an ‘authenticator’.
Then it claimed my registry was corrupt and would not run at all.

I think they deliberately trashed my hard drive.


49 posted on 05/19/2013 7:22:12 PM PDT by Pikachu_Dad (Impeach Sen Quinn)
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To: Mount Athos

http://www.classicshell.net/

I used a similar product called Start8 that mimics the Windows 7 interface in many ways.

http://www.stardock.com/products/start8/

It basically restores the start menu with its functions.

There are still some quirks in Windows 8 that I need to deal with - when I use the touchpad on my laptop, I sometimes inadvertently bring out the overlay of some other useless menu along the right side of the screen.

Frankly, if this laptop had been available with 7, I’d have gotten it that way. The touch screen is a nice novelty, but it isn’t anywhere near a necessary feature, and having the interface unilaterally changed to gain that feature was a bad trade.


50 posted on 05/19/2013 7:40:28 PM PDT by meyer (When people fear the government, you have Tyranny)
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