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Tornado Buster Missile.. Can a Tornado be Disrupted? [VANITY}
http://www.freerepublic.com ^ | May 20, 2013 | GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Posted on 05/20/2013 2:45:28 PM PDT by GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Why hasn't a tornado buster missile or bomb been developed or at least tried? I realize that tornadoes are large and quick moving, but if there's enough time to prepare for one there should be enough time to attempt to stop one.

Could a shock wave or some sort of electrical pulse wave from a strategically placed missile/bomb launched from a fighter jet stop a tornado, or perhaps disrupt its balance successfully enough to stop it's devastation on the ground?


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; Outdoors; Science; Weather
KEYWORDS: bomb; buster; tornado; vanity; weather
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Any thoughts? Maybe this is a crazy idea but after today's massive, devastating tornado in Oklahoma it's worthy of consideration.
1 posted on 05/20/2013 2:45:28 PM PDT by GeorgeWashingtonsGhost
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

A nuclear bomb just might be big enough.


2 posted on 05/20/2013 2:46:30 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do uwhen I have a fire.)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

I have not seen any numbers for the energy of a tornado, but a good sized thunderstorm has the energy of a large nuclear weapon.

The “cure” would be worse than the “disease”.


3 posted on 05/20/2013 2:48:24 PM PDT by BwanaNdege ("To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize"- Voltaire)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

I think the fact that they can’t be predicted with enough accuracy would make preventing them pretty tough.

Better shelters are probably the way to go.


4 posted on 05/20/2013 2:48:30 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Most tornadoes last only minutes. Very few touch the ground or cause serious damage. I would think that the kind of explosive that you are imagining would be more dangerous than the tornado.


5 posted on 05/20/2013 2:48:35 PM PDT by iowamark
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To: driftdiver

I’m serious! Can a strictly horizontal shock wave be created?


6 posted on 05/20/2013 2:48:38 PM PDT by GeorgeWashingtonsGhost
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To: driftdiver

A nuclear bomb just might be big enough.

Fuel Ari bomb and the only thing stopping the use would be the liability of it in advertantly killing someone....

If you wear tinfoil, then HAARP might be able to kill tornadoes...


7 posted on 05/20/2013 2:49:19 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Always wondered about that myself.

My idea is to drop tons of ice into it, to cool the temps and rob it of energy. /s


8 posted on 05/20/2013 2:49:35 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: GraceG

9 posted on 05/20/2013 2:50:55 PM PDT by Lazamataz ("AP" clearly stands for American Pravda. Our news media has become completely and proudly Soviet.)
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To: cripplecreek

Better shelters are probably the way to go.

Agreed, more people in the midwest need to build their houses more like “Hobbit Holes”, on the plus side you can graze animals on the roof, on the minuis you have to deal with animal poop on your roof and you have to mow your roof and would need a stronger roof supports...

The think stopping this would be the inability to mass produce such a house like current houses, if one were to make a decent framework for partially buried houses they may ctach on...


10 posted on 05/20/2013 2:51:48 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Supposing the warhead yield was large enough to disrupt the vortex, it would only last for a few seconds. The funnel would likely resume again. You’re fighting against atmospheric currents... There’s a reason no one has developed anything to dissipate one yet.


11 posted on 05/20/2013 2:53:08 PM PDT by miliantnutcase
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To: GraceG

Berm or underground homes have a lot of advantages like natural thermal insulation. Lighting is an issue but LED lighting is very efficient.


12 posted on 05/20/2013 2:54:40 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

I saw a waterspout come apart when it hit a mountain. The problem with a shock wave or something to destroy a tornado is that you would not want to use something like that in a populated area as you would cause as much damage as the tornado. If you destroy it in an unpopulated area you have not gained much.


13 posted on 05/20/2013 2:55:26 PM PDT by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Hover above the planet and look down. Below is Kansas. Imagine a huge oval which is a low pressure zone. Around it is a high pressure zone. The two zones equalize. That equalization process is a giant set of swirls, rather like stirring cream into coffee. The wall of the swirls is what we see as a tornado. If you disrupt the wall, you will not disrupt the event which causes the swirl, which is the huge pressure difference between the zones. If you manage to disrupt one wall, another will form. This formation continues until the pressures equalize.

On the other hand, you might just go down to Brazil and kill the damned butterflies whose wing flapping causes all these storms.


14 posted on 05/20/2013 2:55:57 PM PDT by Gen.Blather
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To: miliantnutcase

You might only have seconds to try and stop a tornado, but you do usually have a few hours to stop the atmospheric conditions that create tornadoes.

It’s unfortunate nobody has figured out how to tap into the energy that is created when two differing atmospheric pressure areas collide and form these thunderstorm patterns.


15 posted on 05/20/2013 2:58:44 PM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

It really depends on the source of rotation. Tornadoes have been know to “skip” over buildings and rivers. Disrupting a tornadoe at ground level may merely cause it to form somewhere else. One theory has the rotaion begining high up, near the jet stream, making the it difficult to turn off a tornado.


16 posted on 05/20/2013 2:59:24 PM PDT by Huskrrrr
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

No, because angular momentum must be conserved. A nuke would make things worth, drawing things upwards and inwards (which concentrates angular momentum like a whirlpool).


17 posted on 05/20/2013 3:00:21 PM PDT by coloradan (The US has become a banana republic, except without the bananas - or the republic.)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

The bomb itself would have to be so powerful that it would cause devastation.


18 posted on 05/20/2013 3:01:01 PM PDT by piytar (The predator-class is furious that their prey are shooting back.)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Here are a few numbers - still looking for Tornado info.

“This is equivalent to about 200 times the total electrical generating capacity on the planet! NASA says that “during its life cycle a hurricane can expend as much energy as 10,000 nuclear bombs!” And we’re just talking about average hurricanes here, not Katrina.”

“In all, Mount St. Helens released 24 megatons of thermal energy, 7 of which was a direct result of the blast. This is equivalent to 1,600 times the size of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima”


19 posted on 05/20/2013 3:02:32 PM PDT by BwanaNdege ("To learn who rules over you simply find out who you are not allowed to criticize"- Voltaire)
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To: Vendome

The quantities of ice necessary would be huge. You probably would only have to disable it and not kill it all together. Still, it is a lot of energy to suck out of something that massive.

Another way to dissapate the energy is to drop something or somethings into it and steal it of rotational inertia. Thousands of projectiles swirling within the cloud chopping up everything. Doesn’t sound good.


20 posted on 05/20/2013 3:03:14 PM PDT by dhs12345
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

I think this a bad idea. Atmospheric energy must be released; there would be unforeseen consequences.


21 posted on 05/20/2013 3:05:04 PM PDT by Ray76 (Do you reject Obama? And all his works? And all his empty promises?)
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To: dhs12345

Projectiles that pin-wheel.. Hmmmm.. You’re onto something.


22 posted on 05/20/2013 3:07:52 PM PDT by GeorgeWashingtonsGhost
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To: Ray76

Like bigger tornadoes.


23 posted on 05/20/2013 3:08:11 PM PDT by Norm Lenhart
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

You have to disrupt the upper atmosphere, not the funnel. Otherwise it reforms. That is hundreds of miles of sky, thousands of feet ‘deep’.


24 posted on 05/20/2013 3:09:39 PM PDT by Norm Lenhart
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

1) Hard to predict location more than 15 minutes ahead of time

2) The energy in the thunderstorm, and its physical size, are beyond comprehension. These things are 50,000 feet tall.


25 posted on 05/20/2013 3:11:55 PM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

If I remember Jules Verne wrote a si-fi novel in which they destroyed waterspouts with canon fire.

I don’t remember if it was THE MASTER OF THE WORLD or ROBUR THE CONQUEROR, or a different novel.


26 posted on 05/20/2013 3:12:11 PM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (When someone burns a cross on your lawn, the best firehose is an AK-47.)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

We cannot stop one little tornado with a nuclear bomb, but we can change the entire world’s climate by driving around too much in our cars.


27 posted on 05/20/2013 3:12:52 PM PDT by Bubba_Leroy (The Obamanation Continues)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Website below has ideas on tornado resistant houses:

http://www.tornadoproofhouses.com/


28 posted on 05/20/2013 3:13:21 PM PDT by Brad from Tennessee (A politician can't give you anything he hasn't first stolen from you.)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

And maybe something that doesn’t fly very efficiently, too but would have to survive the beating. And the energy would have to go somewhere. Converted to heat from friction and wind resistance?

A ton of energy though.


29 posted on 05/20/2013 3:14:55 PM PDT by dhs12345
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

I’ve been around tornadoes.

Unless you’re willing to go nuclear, I’m sure there is not enough energy to disrupt one.

I’ll bet they have megatons of energy.


30 posted on 05/20/2013 3:17:32 PM PDT by Uncle Miltie (WHO IS ON THE ENEMIES LIST?)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

Work was done at NASA Ames on the subject of disrupting twisters back in the 1970s.....takes a lot of energy to disrupt a single touch down when you have multiple outbreaks it doesn’t work. Plus the damage by effort to eliminate the tornado is most likely worse than the tornado it self


31 posted on 05/20/2013 3:19:00 PM PDT by Nifster
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

I’m kind of on the lines of not trying to alter mother nature.


32 posted on 05/20/2013 3:19:36 PM PDT by Durbin
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To: dhs12345

that’s why I ended my response with the requisite “/s”


33 posted on 05/20/2013 3:23:03 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Gen.Blather

Here is a good daily global view. (Launch worldview)

http://earthdata.nasa.gov/data/near-real-time-data/visualization/worldview


34 posted on 05/20/2013 3:23:22 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

If I lived there I would at least have a 20 ft shipping container buried,


35 posted on 05/20/2013 3:24:40 PM PDT by Lurkina.n.Learnin (President Obma; The Slumlord of the Rentseekers)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

In the 1800s and before, sailing ships used to fire cannonballs at waterspouts in the hope of disrupting them before the got close enough to do damage. Waterspouts are generally much weaker and smaller than a full-on tornado though. And modern day analyses seem to conclude that such a tactic would not have worked in any event.


36 posted on 05/20/2013 3:25:44 PM PDT by kaehurowing
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To: Vendome

Lol. Ya.


37 posted on 05/20/2013 3:27:00 PM PDT by dhs12345
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To: kaehurowing
In the 1800s and before, sailing ships used to fire cannonballs at waterspouts in the hope of disrupting them before the got close enough to do damage. Waterspouts are generally much weaker and smaller than a full-on tornado though. And modern day analyses seem to conclude that such a tactic would not have worked in any event.

But the sailors were bored and full of grog. Plus it was a lot more fun than the buggery.
38 posted on 05/20/2013 3:32:25 PM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

You do not want to add energy to a tornado. The twister is just the part that you can see.


39 posted on 05/20/2013 3:37:46 PM PDT by buffaloguy
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To: Gen.Blather; GeorgeWashingtonsGhost
If it can't be easily disrupted, how about finding a way to start it earlier - when the equalization needed would be less intense and/or when the zones pass over a less populated area.

.But if you really want to stop it in its tracks, then perhaps flying overhead and dropping a picture of Helen Thomas into the vortex would do the trick.
40 posted on 05/20/2013 3:45:52 PM PDT by zencycler
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To: cripplecreek

If they fired a sailor at the waterspout it might have been more effective. At least it’s worth a try.


41 posted on 05/20/2013 3:53:43 PM PDT by kaehurowing
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost
Any thoughts?

That you should read up and educate yourself on these types of weather systems?

Maybe this is a crazy idea (yes it is) but after today's massive, devastating tornado in Oklahoma it's worthy of consideration.

No, no it’s not. You would be better to look into donating money to assist the people of Moore OK than you would fantasizing about launching missile/bomb or EMP’s.

42 posted on 05/20/2013 3:54:01 PM PDT by MD Expat in PA
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To: zencycler

While nature abhors a vacuum, I’m certain nature is indifferent to Helen Thomas. When I said Kansas, I meant all of it; thousands of square miles. The sun is heating the Earth unequally. (The Obama administration has complained bitterly about the inequality of heating, but has no connections with God. The Pope refused to discuss it with Obama.) So the area across which you’d have to equalize the pressure is HUGE...monumental...GIGANTIC. The only thing approaching this scale is the National Debt; the equalization of which will produce a different sort of storm. Any affects we humans could introduce would be, necessarily, human in scale. The area we’re talking about is national in scale.

The political solutions are: Obama didn’t know about the pressure difference until he read about it in the paper, just like you. The pressure difference happened a long time ago, what difference now does it make? It’s Bush’s fault.


43 posted on 05/20/2013 3:54:58 PM PDT by Gen.Blather
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To: cripplecreek

Just listening to TWC reporting on Moore. They said the school, which looks pretty flimsy built had “cinderblock hallways, which were very strong”. BS, cinderblocks are strong for load bearing, but they are relatively easy to knock over.

In the Caribbean where they know hurricanes they build of poured concrete walls and ceilings, which withstand any wind.

These Taj Mahal schools are rarely built strong, just pretty for taxpayers to see where their money went.

At least the hallways in Tornado Alley schools should be made of reinforced concrete that will protect the students and teachers.


44 posted on 05/20/2013 4:02:08 PM PDT by X-spurt (Republic of Texas, Come and Take It!)
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost
Could a shock wave or some sort of electrical pulse wave from a strategically placed missile/bomb launched from a fighter jet stop a tornado, or perhaps disrupt its balance successfully enough to stop it's devastation on the ground?

No.

45 posted on 05/20/2013 4:10:13 PM PDT by 0.E.O
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To: Brad from Tennessee

But people don’t build these because they know John Q. Taxpayer will rebuild their houses for them. Moral hazard.


46 posted on 05/20/2013 4:11:04 PM PDT by GodAndCountryFirst
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

When a storm cell wants to make a tornado, it makes a tornado. If you were able to destroy the tornado, the storm cell would immediately remake the tornado. If you want to permanently destroy a tornado, you would have to destroy the storm cell.

The problem is...

When a front wants to make a storm cell, it makes a storm cell...


47 posted on 05/20/2013 4:17:40 PM PDT by Born to Conserve
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To: zencycler

On reconsideration: Nature has intervened to protect Helen Thomas from rape, conversation and snuggles.

Imagine your tornado was instead an iceberg. The iceberg is formed due to the failure of global warming to keep the ice from melting. If you were to modify the USS Missouri with a huge, spring-loaded Samurai sword so that it could, in one swipe, knock the head off the iceberg, what would happen? It would simply bob up again. The same is true about anything you do to a tornado. The cause of the iceberg is the huge cold zone at the poles, which will continue to produce icebergs. The cause of the tornado is the huge imbalance in pressure (heat) that is spread across hundreds of miles. The tornado, like the iceberg, is a local manifestation of a global phenomenon. Disrupting, or even destroying one iceberg or one tornado does nothing to remedy the global situation that produced them.


48 posted on 05/20/2013 4:24:24 PM PDT by Gen.Blather
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To: GeorgeWashingtonsGhost

An easier solution...

Don’t put any houses and mobile home parks in their path, and they won’t show up.


49 posted on 05/20/2013 4:49:17 PM PDT by adorno (Y)
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To: X-spurt
Just listening to TWC reporting on Moore. They said the school, which looks pretty flimsy built had “cinderblock hallways, which were very strong”. BS, cinderblocks are strong for load bearing, but they are relatively easy to knock over.

Block walls can be very strong indeed. Just insert steel rods in the cells and fill with concrete.

And even ordinary block is a whole lot stronger than wood frame, plywood and drywall.

50 posted on 05/20/2013 4:55:01 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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