Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

To: nickcarraway

Please don’t take this as a slam against this post it is meant as a comment on wine reviews in general. No offense intended.

Reading reviews about wine is like reading an art or movie or play critic’s review and attempting to make any logical connection between the words used and the subject.

Jammy? Sure, OK, I can understand that and imagine the taste.

However:
Fruit-forward??? WTH is the chemical formula for producing Fruit-forward and just what have they failed to convey to a normal human being assuming they are describing a taste. Does this contribute to glo-bull warming/cooling.

Relaxed?? Again, just what chemical formula produces relaxed and what does that do to ones tongue?

I get the impression they are just attempting to impress a limited few snobs who would not dare to dispute the Relaxed taste or if the Fruit was forward or reverse.

Under full disclosure I have to admit to committing the ultimate Wine Faux Pas in France a few years back where the buss boy at our table nearly went spastic when we were willing to try a Wine which had just been released to the market and was suggested by our waiter.

He went ballistic because we were having fish and it was a red wine. Oh the humanity. You would have though we were mixing matter and anti-matter and I am not exaggerating.


15 posted on 05/24/2013 11:53:46 AM PDT by Wurlitzer (Nothing says "ignorance" like Islam! 969)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]


To: Wurlitzer
I hear you. I only like red wine, so I wouldn't be having white wine with fish anyway.

I love the fact that the waiter recommended it, but it was the bus boy who got furious. Only in France. Was he mad at the waiter or you?

17 posted on 05/24/2013 12:02:42 PM PDT by nickcarraway
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

To: Wurlitzer

It’s just the jargon people use to make outsiders think something is complicated or special to be able to charge more. Avoidng plain English impresses some people.


18 posted on 05/24/2013 12:09:02 PM PDT by meatloaf (Support Senate S 1863 & House Bill 1380 to eliminate oil slavery.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

To: Wurlitzer

Well, like you, no offense intended, but just because you don’t understand something doesn’t mean it’s not legit. Folks in the wine industry or who are avid consumers know what these terms mean. I may not understand what a lot of terms used, say, in tree pruning or book binding or basket weaving mean, but that doesn’t mean the terms are meaningless to those who need to use them.

And second, there are plenty of times red wine is great with fish. Depends on the wine, the fish and how its prepared. You decide what you like, there are no rules that must be followed or else. And that’s probably a reason the guy was still a bus boy and not waiter.


19 posted on 05/24/2013 12:12:08 PM PDT by LonelyCon
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

To: Wurlitzer
I get the impression they are just attempting to impress a limited few snobs who would not dare to dispute the Relaxed taste or if the Fruit was forward or reverse.

I'm reminded of Two Buck Chuck winning the blind taste test at the California State Fair competition in 2007.

July 12, 2007

The connoisseurs may cringe, the snobs may even sob, but the judges have spoken: California's best chardonnay costs less than $3.

Charles Shaw Chardonnay, better known as "Two Buck Chuck," beat hundreds of other wines and was named the top prize in a prestigious tasting competition in California.

"The characteristics that we look for in our gold medal winner … a nice creamy butter, fruity … it was a delight to taste," said 2007 California State Fair Commercial Wine Competition judge Michael Williams.

The affordable wine beat out 350 other California chardonnays to win the double gold. Second place went to an $18 bottle, and the most expensive wines at the event, at the price of $55, didn't even medal.

More at ABC Story
23 posted on 05/24/2013 12:21:39 PM PDT by Bob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

To: Wurlitzer
I get the impression they are just attempting to impress a limited few snobs who would not dare to dispute the Relaxed taste or if the Fruit was forward or reverse.

Fruit forward generally means you get more of a fruit (grape) taste at the start of the sip, vs a more aged wine where the fruit flavor has dissipated. Relaxed typically describes a wine which requires less decanting time before unpleasant flavors have dissipated from the wine.

As for ocean aging - colder aging has been around for quite a while, and warmer cellars can give a marked difference in flavor. Typically, however, the difference is right after removing the cork - once decanted for an hour or so, it is difficult to tell the difference between a cold cellar and a warm cellar aging.

And yes, I drink two buck Chuck. The Savignon Blanc is particularly good this year.

25 posted on 05/24/2013 12:31:43 PM PDT by kingu (Everything starts with slashing the size and scope of the federal government.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

To: Wurlitzer
He went ballistic because we were having fish and it was a red wine. Oh the humanity.

Yeah, yeah pal. Just fill it up.


35 posted on 05/24/2013 1:08:18 PM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (For me, I plan to die standing as a free man rather than spend one second on my knees as a slave.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

To: Wurlitzer

Light red wine goes fine with fish, the rule is not arbitrary, but it is related how flavors blend. Still, the con-a-sewers lingo is often, as you point out, used to impress and not to inform.


37 posted on 05/24/2013 1:11:43 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Bad things are wrong! Ice cream is delicious!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

To: Wurlitzer

When wine is aged there are chemical reactions happening for anywhere from one to twenty five years depending on the wine. These involve dissolved gasses, tannins, acids, and resins, and depend on many factors including the wood barrels when used.

There are around 20 aroma families used to describe a wines smell such as floral, fruits, herbaceous, minerals, spices, and musk.

Also considered are texture, color, alcohol content and of course, taste. For taste there are over 100 descriptors that describe the balance between acids, sugars, tannins, and the alcohol as well as specific flavors.


41 posted on 05/24/2013 1:23:00 PM PDT by KEVLAR (Liberty or Death)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson