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Baby names reveal parents' political ideology
Fox ^ | 6/7/13 | Stephanie Pappas

Posted on 06/07/2013 4:13:47 PM PDT by workerbee

* * * *

The sounds of liberal and conservative names varied, too. For both boys and girls, liberals tended to pick more feminine-sounding choices, such as Liam, Ely and Leila names that include lots of L sounds and soft-A endings, including popular choices Ella and Sophia.

Conservatives, on the other hand, tend to pick names with more masculine-sounding Ks, Bs, Ds and Ts, such as Kurt. A couple of famous national political families demonstrate that pattern, Oliver said: The liberal Obamas named their daughters Sasha and Malia, both names heavy on As and Ls, whereas the conservative Palin family picked more masculine-sounding names for both their boys and girls, particularly Track, Trig, Bristol and Piper (although third daughter Willow got a softer-sounding moniker).

The findings of an ideological split mostly among the well-educated are no surprise, Oliver said, as only about 20 percent of the American public holds strong political principles, and those people tend to be college educated. In that group, he said, the data suggest that liberals are looking to distinguish themselves for their culture and education by choosing esoteric names. Conservatives, on the other hand, seem to pick traditional names that will distinguish their kids as economically successful.

* * * *

(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Society
KEYWORDS: babies; conservative; liberal; names
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To: workerbee

how does ‘Malia’ translate into Spanish?


21 posted on 06/07/2013 5:08:14 PM PDT by RockyTx
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To: boop

Reminds me of Barbra Streisand.


22 posted on 06/07/2013 5:13:06 PM PDT by RetroSexual
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To: workerbee

I was born to two very liberal parents in the sixties. They wanted to give me an obscure name so they picked Jason.

That didn’t work out as planned...

When I was in kindergarten and first grade, I remember people saying “what was that name again? Did you say Justin? Could spell it?”

By the time I was in seventh grade, I never had that problem again. I decided I liked having a common name.

I gave my son a common name that people would know and could spell. My son is not my possession. It’s not right to use him to prove that I’m arty or sophisticated or whatever.


23 posted on 06/07/2013 5:13:20 PM PDT by Our man in washington
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To: al_c

there was also Diva Muffin

Moon apparently wasn’t scarred. She named her child Mathilda Plum Doucette. Not bizarre like her name but still a tad off the beaten path


24 posted on 06/07/2013 5:16:01 PM PDT by plain talk
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To: goodwithagun
If I ever have a daughter, I like the name Shiloh quite a bit.

For boys names I like Rhett and Silas.

25 posted on 06/07/2013 5:17:45 PM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard (Gone Galt, 11/07/12----No king but Christ! Don't tread on me!)
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To: Our man in washington

My parents did the name thing with very common names (for me and my seven siblings). I find myself wishing I had a more uncommon name. You can only hear “Joe” so many times before it gets bland.


26 posted on 06/07/2013 5:20:10 PM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard (Gone Galt, 11/07/12----No king but Christ! Don't tread on me!)
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To: al_c
Frank Zappa, who considers himself a conservative, named his kids Dweezil and Moon Unit. Discuss.

He considers nothing.

27 posted on 06/07/2013 5:21:24 PM PDT by higgmeister ( In the Shadow of The Big Chicken!)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

Good point. I hadn’t considered that perspective.


28 posted on 06/07/2013 5:27:34 PM PDT by Our man in washington
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To: workerbee

I’ve always favored names that don’t sound weird or non gender appropriate and avoided any that would lend my children to potential ridicule. I’ve never been fan of split masculine/feminine names like GeorgeAnn either.

I have a Johnathan, Ryan, Jason, Mason, Jackson and a Kathryn who is my oldest.

The middle names I was a bit more flexible with but I still wanted to make sure they flowed with and fit well with the name.

Life is challenging enough without having a weird name and I strongly believe names are a building block affecting how one sees themselves. I also avoided having a son named after me. I wanted all my kids to see themselves as unique.


29 posted on 06/07/2013 5:28:05 PM PDT by Maelstorm (This country wasn't founded with the battle cry "Give me liberty or give me a govt check!")
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To: workerbee

The Afro-name-generator kicks out a lot of liberal names.


30 posted on 06/07/2013 5:29:34 PM PDT by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: workerbee

I have a 52 yo daughter named Kenya. How could I have known............


31 posted on 06/07/2013 5:30:42 PM PDT by Coldwater Creek (")
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To: freedumb2003
“Sarah” is good.

It says "feminine, with a hint of badass"


32 posted on 06/07/2013 5:32:52 PM PDT by Oztrich Boy (Rules are for the guidance of wise men and the blind obedience of fools - Solon, Lawmaker of Athens)
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To: workerbee

What a bunch of Bolshevik!


33 posted on 06/07/2013 5:36:27 PM PDT by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
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To: plain talk

I personally really like Matilda (no h, thanks). And Miranda.

What’s really interesting is how certain “old” names make it back to popularity and others don’t. Take Emma, for instance, a name hugely popular in the late 1890s and then all but died out around WWII. About ten years ago it saw a resurgence and is now the 2nd most popular girls name. But Florence, even more widely used at the turn of the 20th century than Emma, is practically extinct with no sign of resusitation.


34 posted on 06/07/2013 5:37:21 PM PDT by workerbee (The President of the United States is DOMESTIC ENEMY #1)
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To: Oztrich Boy
Sarah says "feminine, with a hint of badass" LOL, that describes MY Sarah, alright.
35 posted on 06/07/2013 5:38:11 PM PDT by workerbee (The President of the United States is DOMESTIC ENEMY #1)
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To: boop

Oh my gosh. If I were a hooker on crack Id turn him down even for $1 million,


36 posted on 06/07/2013 5:38:37 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: workerbee; All

George Foreman had it right!


37 posted on 06/07/2013 5:41:17 PM PDT by VMI70
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To: combat_boots

If I ever have a daughter I’d like to name herAda Josephine. A favorite aunt as well as my grandfather’s first wife who died in childbirth had that name. Roxanne is a family name, too, going back generations, but The Police might have ruined that lovely old name.


38 posted on 06/07/2013 5:41:52 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: goodwithagun

Re: Cecelia, it is a lovely name, but I can’t help but think of the Simon & Garfunkle song by that name:

Making love in the afternoon with Cecilia
Up in my bedroom (making love)
I got up to wash my face
When I come back to bed
Someone’s taken my place

Cecilia, you’re breaking my heart
You’re shaking my confidence daily
Oh, Cecilia, I’m down on my knees
I’m begging you please to come home
Come on home


39 posted on 06/07/2013 5:46:48 PM PDT by Nevadan
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To: RockyTx
how does ‘Malia’ translate into Spanish?

Hard to pin down.

A girl's name of Hawaiian, Hebrew, Italian, Native American, Spanish and Zuni origin that has a traditionally feminine sound. Malia is at an all-time popularity peak and is currently ranked #345 among the U.S. girls' names. Meaning: bitter; sea of bitterness. A form of Mary.
Source: www.nymbler.com

40 posted on 06/07/2013 5:47:30 PM PDT by workerbee (The President of the United States is DOMESTIC ENEMY #1)
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