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Over 30 Million Bees Found Dead In Elmwood Canada
Collective ^ | July 1 2013 | unknown

Posted on 07/03/2013 9:51:03 AM PDT by Fawn

Shortly after 50,000 bees were found dead in an Oregon parking lot (read more here), a staggering 37 million bees have been found dead in Elmwood, Ontario, Canada. Dave Schuit, who runs a honey operation in Elmwood has lost 600 hives. He is pointing the finger at the insecticides known as neonicotinoids, which are manufactured by Bayer CropScience Inc. This also comes after a recent report released by the British Beekeepers Association (BBKA) that recorded its largest loss of honeybees ever. You can read more about that here. The European Union has stepped forward, having banned multiple pesticides that have been linked to killing millions of bees. You can view the studies and read more about that here.

The loss comes after the planting of corn. Neonicotinoid pesticides are used to coat corn seed with air seeders. This results in having the pesticide dust blown into the air when planted. The death of millions of pollinators was studied by Purdue University. They discovered that Bees exhibited neurotoxic symptoms. They analyzed dead bees and found that traces of thiamethoxam/clothiandin were present in each case. The only major source of these compounds are seed treatments of field crops. You can view that study here (1).

Bee deaths are increasing exponentially. An international team of scientists led by Holland’s Utrecht University has concluded that, “large scale prophylaxic use in agriculture, their high persistence in soil and water, and their uptake by plants and translocation to flowers, neonicotinoids put pollinators at risk. This is some of the research that led to the European Unions ban of the pesticides, as mentioned and referenced earlier.

(Excerpt) Read more at collective-evolution.com ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Outdoors
KEYWORDS: bees
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1 posted on 07/03/2013 9:51:03 AM PDT by Fawn
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To: Fawn
It's the end of the world and I feel fine am quite worried.
2 posted on 07/03/2013 9:53:06 AM PDT by BipolarBob
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To: Fawn

A sign? Like all those dead birds.


3 posted on 07/03/2013 9:53:29 AM PDT by Viennacon
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To: Viennacon
Over 30 Million Bees Found Dead In Elmwood Canada

Was there windmill involved?

4 posted on 07/03/2013 9:55:17 AM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: Puppage
Was there windmill involved?

Did you bother to read the article before posting?

5 posted on 07/03/2013 9:56:15 AM PDT by BipolarBob
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To: Fawn

(once more)

Something’s getting them. I grow a lot of squash in the summer. Usually the big squash blossoms are full to capacity of happy little bees. 2 or 3 per blossom sometimes. This summer I’ve seen exactly ONE bee in ONE squash blossom. Usually my squash field is just a buzzing and humming expanse of happy bee-ness. This summer it’s eerily quiet.


6 posted on 07/03/2013 9:56:46 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Puppage

I don’t know about windmills but I know a leftard website when I see one.


7 posted on 07/03/2013 9:57:00 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: greeneyes

Possible interest.


8 posted on 07/03/2013 9:57:09 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Fawn

Victims of climate change. Or Bush’s fault.


9 posted on 07/03/2013 9:57:14 AM PDT by wny
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To: BipolarBob
Did you bother to read the article before posting?

Gimme a call when your sense of humor is delivered, ok?

10 posted on 07/03/2013 9:57:29 AM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: Fawn
As a bee-keeper...this is what I really worry about.

Bees are amazing and without them...many foods as we know them will be in very short demand...as will the cash in your wallet.

11 posted on 07/03/2013 9:57:29 AM PDT by NELSON111
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To: Fawn

There are alternative products. Hope we can switch in time.


12 posted on 07/03/2013 9:57:32 AM PDT by American in Israel (A wise man's heart directs him to the right, but the foolish mans heart directs him toward the left.)
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To: Black Agnes

And you are likely to get ONE squash.


13 posted on 07/03/2013 9:58:05 AM PDT by American in Israel (A wise man's heart directs him to the right, but the foolish mans heart directs him toward the left.)
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To: cripplecreek

The complete lack of honeybees this spring and summer is scary.

I usually have a surplus of pollinators.

This growing season I can count on the fingers of one hand the number of honeybees I’ve seen.

And not just honeybees. I haven’t seen a whole lot of the native pollinators either. There are usually bumblebee ‘territories’ in my yard. This year I’ve not seen ANY bumblebees so far.


14 posted on 07/03/2013 9:59:10 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: American in Israel

Actually I’m playing squash pimp every morning. Easy for me to do as I only have 24 squash plants. Imagine if I had an acre or two of them and relied on pollinators to do this.

And squash were pollinated by native pollinators in the western hemisphere prior to the introduction of the honeybee. I haven’t seen any of the native pollinators this year either.


15 posted on 07/03/2013 10:00:48 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Puppage

Ha! That’s good!


16 posted on 07/03/2013 10:00:52 AM PDT by SMARTY ("The test of every religious, political, or educational system is the man that it forms." H. Amiel)
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To: Puppage

I sense another candle light vigil/memorial coming on to honor our brothers and sisters. Much like the hippy old growth tree celebration of life.


17 posted on 07/03/2013 10:01:04 AM PDT by rktman (Inergalactic background checks? King hussein you're first up.)
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To: American in Israel

American in Israel ~:” There are alternative products.”

What suggested alternative products have you in mind ?


18 posted on 07/03/2013 10:01:07 AM PDT by Tilted Irish Kilt (“Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction.” - Ronald Reagan)
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To: NELSON111

Yes, I consider this a serious matter. I’m sure our government will get right on banning things that will kill off our food supply right after the Big Gulp, trans-fat and gluten fads fade away. The prospect of millions starving to death is not the least bit appealing to me.


19 posted on 07/03/2013 10:01:41 AM PDT by BipolarBob
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To: SMARTY

:-)
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/3036842/posts


20 posted on 07/03/2013 10:02:12 AM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: Black Agnes

I’ve seen some bees, but not as many as I usually do...


21 posted on 07/03/2013 10:03:03 AM PDT by Don W (Know what you WANT. Know what you NEED. Know the DIFFERENCE!)
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To: BipolarBob

Low bee count means low amount of food to eat. I’m planting some flowers in my garden to help lure the bees in. I have to get food growing to have fresh food along with long term stored food. When I picked my own tomatoes, I knew no other human had handled them and no chemicals were sprayed on them. These days you don’t know what has happened to fresh food you buy at grocery.

I just started trying to grow food plants and I’ve been a pest asking questions to those on the weekly gardening thread.


22 posted on 07/03/2013 10:05:37 AM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: cripplecreek
>>>I don’t know about windmills but I know a leftard website when I see one.

Yep...you're right. There's no such thing as hive colony collpase...there really weren't 30 million bees dead and numerous data hasn't been shown that CCD appears to be linked with insecticides...and that big-food is doing some pretty aweful things to the food we eat.

Glad so many here on FR know everything and keep us from making mistakes.

23 posted on 07/03/2013 10:05:38 AM PDT by NELSON111
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To: Don W

That’s the way it was here last year. Wait till next year.

I’ve had a lot of strawberry blooms that just didn’t get set this year. I’ve never had that happen before. Ditto blueberry blooms and raspberries. Haven’t seen that before. And I’m pushing 50.

The ‘old world’ foods are in trouble without the honeybee. And if the lack of native pollinators is also a widespread the new world foods (squash, etc) will be in trouble too.


24 posted on 07/03/2013 10:05:52 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

They come and go. They’re rebounding around here but even in bad honeybee (honeybees aren’t native to America) years, the native pollinators themselves tend to rebound.


25 posted on 07/03/2013 10:06:29 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Marcella

What’s scary to me is the lack of honeybees.

Usually in late spring when my cilantro and dill bolt they are covered, just covered, in pollinators of all sorts.

This year, none. And not just ‘no honeybees’. No pollinators at all.


26 posted on 07/03/2013 10:07:20 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: NELSON111

Actually I think you need to eat some more paint chips.


27 posted on 07/03/2013 10:07:35 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Black Agnes
Shhhhh...please don't try speaking facts to those who think EVERYTHING that is pro-nature is a liberal conspiracy.

And I noticed it this year too with my squash. That's one reason I now have a hive. Fortunately there are no big ag fields around to kill off my bees.

28 posted on 07/03/2013 10:08:24 AM PDT by NELSON111
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To: Black Agnes

Honeybees have taken over an old birdhouse at the far end of my yard. Given these recent developments, I think I won’t disturb them.


29 posted on 07/03/2013 10:08:30 AM PDT by Buckeye McFrog
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To: cripplecreek

Yes, I realize that honeybees aren’t native to the Americas.

I haven’t seen any normal native pollinators this year either.

And I’m already having issues with bloom set on things that rely on honeybees.

And the new world foods too like squash. I’ve never had to play squash pimp before.

Usually my garden is a hive of pollinators. Since the beginning of June i’ve seen just 2 pollinators of any kind in my garden. Usually even my tomatoes are covered.


30 posted on 07/03/2013 10:09:15 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

“Something’s getting them.”

I read a long research article on what is doing this and it is the chemical coating on corn seed that is killing the bees. They die from the chemical on the corn, then the chemical is in the ground and whatever is planted next also kills the bees as that chemical goes into those plants.

I believe I read England and other EU countries will no longer use that seed.


31 posted on 07/03/2013 10:09:24 AM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Buckeye McFrog

Make them happy. You might have a treasure.

Hubby is looking into beekeeping just ensure we have adequate pollination for our stuff. It’s been an issue this year.


32 posted on 07/03/2013 10:09:52 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

I spent a few days camping in a national forest earlier this month. The location was at least 10 miles in all directions from any commercial agriculture and there was no phone service.

The wild honeybees were thick as flies at the campsite.


33 posted on 07/03/2013 10:11:17 AM PDT by Rebelbase (Our parents: The Greatest Generation. Their kids and grand kids: The Stupidest.)
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To: Buckeye McFrog

You might plant flowers for them. So they don’t wander too far abroad and contact ‘bad stuff’. They love cilantro in bloom, dill, etc. Read up on that.


34 posted on 07/03/2013 10:11:57 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Fawn; SpinnerWebb

If they all die, we all die.


35 posted on 07/03/2013 10:12:04 AM PDT by tx_eggman (Liberalism is only possible in that moment when a man chooses Barabas over Christ.)
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To: BipolarBob
The prospect of millions starving to death is not the least bit appealing to me.

Me, either, but it's very appealing to a certain ideology and been used to great effect in the past. Ayers had similar ideas.

Hmmm...are we a part of a man caused disaster, maybe caused on purpose?

36 posted on 07/03/2013 10:12:43 AM PDT by GBA (Our obamanation: Animal Farm meets 1984 in A Brave New World. Crony capitalism, chaos and control.)
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To: Fawn

The loss of 30+ million honeybees is enormous cause for alarm.


37 posted on 07/03/2013 10:13:02 AM PDT by freebilly (Creepy and the Ass Crackers....)
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To: Marcella

I’m into gardening. I’m stocking up on fertilizer supplies and soil amendments. Most everything is thriving at the moment. I have way too much squash but the green beans didn’t set as many blooms as normal. My FIL gave me 55 tomato plants, so we’ll be canning those before long.


38 posted on 07/03/2013 10:13:15 AM PDT by BipolarBob
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To: Rebelbase

Well, at least there might be a source of replacement bees if things get really bad.

We live fairly far away (2 or 3 miles at least) from any commercial agriculture and this is the first year we’ve had a problem. My parents, 60m away, have a problem this year too. My mother has grown squash there for 60 years and this is the first year she’s ever had problems with pollination. I had to explain squash sex to her and she’s having to pollinate by hand now too. And she lives in the country.

None of the little old people who garden can remember having to hand pollinate their squash.


39 posted on 07/03/2013 10:15:05 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

Not many moths or butterflies either. I’m thinking lawn chemicals.


40 posted on 07/03/2013 10:15:38 AM PDT by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

Possibly. We haven’t seen any butterflies this spring either. But we live far enough out that nobody really uses lawn chemicals. Yards are ‘bush hogged’. Weeds just get mown down too.


41 posted on 07/03/2013 10:17:23 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: tx_eggman

they won’t ALL die. only the ones without the Monsanto patented immunity gene.


42 posted on 07/03/2013 10:19:14 AM PDT by SpinnerWebb (In 2012 you will awaken from your HOPEnosis and have no recollection of this... "Constitution")
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To: GBA

Some things don’t rely on bees for pollination. Corn, rice, tomatoes, peppers, things that have ‘perfect’ blooms or are pollinated by wind mostly.

But you can hang it up for most fruits and and some veggies. Ditto some herbs and spices.


43 posted on 07/03/2013 10:19:18 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: freebilly
The loss of 30+ million honeybees is enormous cause for alarm.

Certainly to the beekeeper but its not that many bees in the grand scheme of things and social animals tend to die in large numbers. In the great lakes Alewives die by the hundreds of millions every so often. Its usually the result of a hemorrhagic virus that affects fish and they're particularly susceptible.
44 posted on 07/03/2013 10:20:32 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Black Agnes

Plenty of bees here....course we have lots of lavender growing...they seem to REALLY like lavender


45 posted on 07/03/2013 10:20:53 AM PDT by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: Black Agnes

I’d like to try growing Paw Paw trees but it sounds like I may need to hang rotting meat in them to attract flies which pollinate them.


46 posted on 07/03/2013 10:22:18 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

Hubby has a coworker who’s a beekeeper and one of my dad’s friends is also a beekeeper. They live 75m from each other as the crow flies. Both had massive losses in their hives this spring. The first had over 50 hives maintained by him and his family. They have 3 surviving hives. My dad’s friend lost over half of his hives.

If it were just this one beekeeper mentioned in the article I wouldn’t worry.

It’s the loss of honeybees AND the native pollinators that has me concerned.


47 posted on 07/03/2013 10:22:50 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: cripplecreek

Your neighbors would cut it and burn it. Trust me. They are FOUL foul smelling.

You won’t make friends or influence people if you have close neighbors.

I’ve thought about planting one on some property my family owns way in the sticks though.


48 posted on 07/03/2013 10:24:00 AM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: goodnesswins

We’re about to have our purple loosetrife bloom. Miles and miles of purple invasion.


49 posted on 07/03/2013 10:24:23 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Black Agnes

To this, and sort of bee related, I was remarking just the other day at the glaring lack of wasps and hornets around this year.

Every year of my life there have been scads of active and annoying hornets/wasps where I live building all manner of nests any and everywhere. I bought 3 cans of long-range spray back in April to get ready for them. But, this year, nothing. No nests. By this time I would have killed out several dozen and I’ve yet to see one.

I don’t know what’s going on......


50 posted on 07/03/2013 10:24:34 AM PDT by FAA
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