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Exactly 150 years ago today...

Posted on 07/03/2013 11:01:00 AM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard

Or rather, 150 years ago this minute, 2:00 P.M. eastern time, 12,500 men of three confederate divisions, under the overall command of General Longstreet, stepped into the burning fields of history in what we know as Pickett's charge.

God bless them...Men with the courage to stand up and march in formation across a mile of open, lead-swept ground for a cause they believed in simply aren't born any more.

I'm sure there are FReepers reading this at this moment who had ancestors in that body of men -- I have an ancestor who was standing on the other side of the wall.

As I said, God bless them. And may we always remember them.


TOPICS: History; Military/Veterans
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Just a reminder on this moment...Unnecessary on this site, but so many Americans, particularly young Americans, simply don't know or care about the events of that day. Worse still, they are brainwashed to think of those men as demons.
1 posted on 07/03/2013 11:01:00 AM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

A few years ago, myself and a friend walked this field, from the woods to the ridge.

To imagine doing this while under fire, with all that entails, was simply mind-boggling. Not sure that I could have found the courage for that.


2 posted on 07/03/2013 11:10:43 AM PDT by tcrlaf (Well, it is what the Sheeple voted for....)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd
A Cutting-Edge Second Look at the Battle of Gettysburg.

Some on FR pooh-poohed it when it was posted, but I've been playing with it for days.

3 posted on 07/03/2013 11:11:29 AM PDT by 1rudeboy
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

Exactly 150 years ago, all my Confederate army ancestors were a day away from surrendering at Vicksburg. I suspect they were ready to go home anyhow. I think that there were a lot of rather reluctant conscripts in the rebel army at Vicksburg while Lee’s eastern army had a greater percentage of early volunteering true believers.


4 posted on 07/03/2013 11:11:51 AM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

No daylight savings time in 1863. You’re off by an hour.


5 posted on 07/03/2013 11:12:55 AM PDT by Timber Rattler (Just say NO! to RINOS and the GOP-E)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

I have ancestors standing on both sides of that now “hallowed ground.”


6 posted on 07/03/2013 11:14:45 AM PDT by zerosix (Native Sunflower)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

My ancestor:
Junius, aka June, Kimble enlisted as Corporal in the 14th Tennessee Infantry Regiment. He wrote a story about his experience at Gettysburg that made him famous among Civil War historians.
Junius was born Apr 1842 in Tennessee (or possibly Kentucky) to Herbert S. Kimble, an attorney, and his wife Martha Farmer.
Martha’s parents were Thomas Farmer and Lurene Harper.
Thomas was born 1760 in Virginia and died 18 Apr 1818 in Robertson County, Tennessee. His parents were Lodowick Farmer and Sarah Cheatham.
Ludowick’s parents were Henry Farmer and Sarah Ward.

He was 21 years old that day in July, a soldier in the 14th Tennessee infantry regiment, and he had just been given the orders that would determine the rest of his life - if there was to be a life longer than two or three hours. He and his unit were to march across a field which rose slightly to the well-entrenched position of the enemy. The march was a little under a mile.
He examined the field and mentally measured his chances of survival. The prospect did not encourage him. “Realizing just what was before me and the brave boys with me, and at one of the most serious moments in life, I asked aloud the question: ‘June Kimble, are you going to do your duty today?’”
He was satisfied by his answer and wrote, “All dread...passed away.” Asked by the other men in his unit how things looked, he replied, “Boys, if we have to go, it will be hot for us, and we will have to do our best.”
Fast forward....the battle is over. The Confederates have failed to take the Union position. There are dead and wounded southern soldiers all over that field. June (Junius) Kimble is trapped near the Federal line.

When I realized that the assault on Cemetery Ridge was a failure, I sprang out of the enemy’s works and rushed across to the slab fence, and dropped to the ground behind a large rock for protection. There were a number of other rocks similar, extending with the fence and behind each rock there was one or two men all busy loading and firing at the enemy’s reinforcements coming over the crest of the ridge to our left. At my side, behind a rock, I noticed a comrade, also loading and firing. He was a handsome, fair complected youth, in fact he was a beardless boy, as I discovered.

I used in this battle a Mississippi rifle, with which I had killed squirrels [Union soldiers] considering myself a fairly good marksman, while shooting from this rock, I noticed a federal soldier clothed in blue pants and red shirt, standing some 50 or 60 yards to my left, with his left foot upon a low place in the rock fence, shooting at the retreating confederates. In my effort to pick him off, with good rest across my rock, I deliberately fired five shots at this red shirt. If I touched him, he gave no evidence of my splendid marksmanship. In my disgust I turned to my boy comrade and said to him “Shoot that fellow in the red shirt to the left”. In reply he exclaimed in a loud tone, “Why dam him, I have shot at him four times”. “I am going out of here”. He sprang to his feet, turning his back to the enemy, and in that instant, I distinctly heard the bullet strike his head. He fell upon his face, and was dead, without a struggle. He was a member of Armistead’s Virginia Brigade. He wore a neat, rather new dark gray uniform. Although a mere youth myself, I felt so much older than that bright-eyed, fair-faced brave boy looked, that a real sorrow passed into my heart, as lying by him I knew that his gallant spirit had winged its flight to its God.
At this moment I deliberated as to my own course, shall or shall I not surrender, rather than attempt to run the gauntlet of fire from innumerable guns. My first conclusion was to surrender. I laid my gun to one side, bowed up my body, unbuckled my cartridge belt, and was ready. But this conclusion and preparation for the safe side of the question was quickly recalled, as prison bars loomed up before me. I bowed up again, rebuckled my belt, grasped my gun, sprang to my feet, and made the run for liberty and won out. The near by zip of unfriendly bullets, reminding me of the danger of back wounds, and the more or less disgrace that clings to such wounds, caused me to about face and “gallantly” back out; which run and back out was safely accomplished and without so much as a scratch of clothing or flesh. It is due perhaps to state, that when I left my rock, the red shirt man still stood in his hole in the wall, seemingly a very live yankee, and no doubt returned my compliment of shots, as I made for tall timber. I, at least was very cognizant of many near by lead messengers as they zipped on either side and made crosses on the ground in front, and then in my rear, in the backward movement, thanks to their poor marksmanship.
After the war, June Kimble lived in Eastland, Texas, was the first elected mayor of that town, and was an editor of a local paper. He became vice president of a bank and died in 1911.


7 posted on 07/03/2013 11:15:33 AM PDT by februus
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

I believe they were ordered to cross that killing ground and would have been shot had they not. You might say, forced to die a hero.


8 posted on 07/03/2013 11:15:55 AM PDT by fish hawk (no tyrant can remain in power without the consent and cooperation of his victims.)
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To: Timber Rattler

No time zones, either. You’ll have to look up when 2 hours after meridian is for Gettysburg.


9 posted on 07/03/2013 11:17:25 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: fish hawk

Corp. Willard Pinkham 20th Maine. Killed on July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg.


10 posted on 07/03/2013 11:18:36 AM PDT by massgopguy (I owe everything to George Bailey)
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To: sneakers

bttt


11 posted on 07/03/2013 11:20:04 AM PDT by sneakers
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To: tcrlaf

Same here. A couple years ago I walked the field at dusk — there was hardly anyone else around, and it was very quiet. Eerie and awe-inspiring at the same time. Men were cast out of iron in those days.


12 posted on 07/03/2013 11:21:17 AM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard (Gone Galt, 11/07/12----No king but Christ! Don't tread on me!)
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To: Sherman Logan

Okay okay, but you get the idea. ;)


13 posted on 07/03/2013 11:21:46 AM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard (Gone Galt, 11/07/12----No king but Christ! Don't tread on me!)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

My GGgrandfather fought at Culp’s Hill (49th VA inf) and my wife’s GGgrandfather was captured on July 1st and died at Fort Delaware (55th NC inf).

When watching the movie Gettysburg, one has to be in awe of the artillery prior to Pickett’s charge. To think the movie only used a fraction of the cannon and they had reduced charges. The barrage must have been deafening in reality.


14 posted on 07/03/2013 11:24:12 AM PDT by wfu_deacons
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

“I think that there were a lot of rather reluctant conscripts in the rebel army at Vicksburg”

Confederate conscription was a poorly-managed sore-point throughout the war. Also, leadership was an issue, with the most motivated gravitating to the armies of the east, where Lee was taking the fight to the Union, while in the center-west it was mostly defensive, with no real answer available to the northern gunboats.


15 posted on 07/03/2013 11:28:09 AM PDT by tcrlaf (Well, it is what the Sheeple voted for....)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd
Ten years ago, it was fairly common to see the 1993 film, "Gettysburg" on cable TV. Haven't seen it in years. You would think with the 150th commemoration it would be shown. Signs of the times.

The 2nd day's action on Little Round Top has haunted me for years. Paternal side of the family are Mainers. Maternal side are Alabamians. While there is no family history from either side to indicate they were there, the symbolism of Chamberlain's 20th Maine bayonet charge into a regiment of Alabamians remains with me.

We were visiting my family in Eastport, ME, over the 4th of July in 1995. Always a marvelous time to be there with the weather and the incredible festivities and patriotism. I was watching "Gettysburg on the TV when my uncle walked in. He shook his head and said, "I see the South is still fighting the war."

16 posted on 07/03/2013 11:31:32 AM PDT by MacNaughton
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To: wfu_deacons

It’s believed that the grand cannonade preceding Pickett’s Charge was the loudest manmade sound on the North American Continent until the Trinity test in 1945.


17 posted on 07/03/2013 11:32:31 AM PDT by tanknetter
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To: wfu_deacons

Our ancestors were most certainly trading shots with each other then — 2nd Lt. Lemuel Rossiter, 2nd Wisconsin Volunteer Inf.


18 posted on 07/03/2013 11:32:32 AM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard (Gone Galt, 11/07/12----No king but Christ! Don't tread on me!)
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To: tcrlaf

With a few exceptions, Confederate leadership in the west was nothing to Bragg about.


19 posted on 07/03/2013 11:34:04 AM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: MacNaughton

A few years ago, I visited the battlefield and stood at the line defended by the 20th Maine on Little Round Top. Someone had placed fresh flowers there on the rocks. People still remember.


20 posted on 07/03/2013 11:36:05 AM PDT by Campion ("Social justice" begins in the womb)
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To: MacNaughton

heck 10 years ago the President of the United States would be speaking on TV about it even for 20 minutes. This dude in Chief we have now has said nothing about it at all.


21 posted on 07/03/2013 11:36:44 AM PDT by napscoordinator (Santorum-Bachmann 2016 for the future of the Country!)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

Never get into a nit-picking contest with me. :)


22 posted on 07/03/2013 11:37:26 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

Grant’s capture of Vicksburg was arguably of more strategic value than Meade’s victory at Gettysburg, but it is always the latter that marks the day, probably because of Lincoln’s famous address.


23 posted on 07/03/2013 11:38:50 AM PDT by IronJack (=)
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To: februus

Thanks for that story/history. I’ve been to Gettysburg a few times — always impressive. I’ve never walked Picketts Charge but I’d imagine it is awe inspiring. Years ago, I purchased (on Ebay) a copy of the NY Times dated July 6, 1863 with the very first reports of Gettysburg (and some reports on Vicksburg). Truly a significant moment in the history of this great nation.


24 posted on 07/03/2013 11:39:38 AM PDT by ReleaseTheHounds ("The problem with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." M. Thatcher)
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

The biggest exception being Forrest. But he wasn’t from the real aristocracy.


25 posted on 07/03/2013 11:39:44 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

I had eight family members serving for NC in the War. One known member fought at Gettysburg, although it is possible most were there. Of note is my great-great grandfather Augustus Cristopj “Gus” Vogler who was a private in the NC 57th Infantry Co. D from Winston-Salem NC. He fought and was captured on July 2 probably at Culp’s Hill or Cemetary Hill. He may have been wounded but survived the wound and was interred at Point Lookout MD POW facility until his death in early March 1865 a few short weeks before the end of hostilities.


26 posted on 07/03/2013 11:42:23 AM PDT by GOP1959
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To: Sherman Logan
The biggest exception being Forrest. But he wasn’t from the real aristocracy.

Cleburne was another outstanding leader. And like Forrest, he didn't fit the aristocratic mold either.

27 posted on 07/03/2013 11:44:29 AM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: MacNaughton

You would at least think it would be carried on Turner Classic Movies channel, given it was a Turner production (one of the best things to come out or Turner Broadcasting).


28 posted on 07/03/2013 11:45:34 AM PDT by ReleaseTheHounds ("The problem with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." M. Thatcher)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd
Checkout today's 'wallpaper' at www.bing.com
29 posted on 07/03/2013 11:48:37 AM PDT by Servant of the Cross (the Truth will set you free)
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To: IronJack
Grant’s capture of Vicksburg was arguably of more strategic value than Meade’s victory at Gettysburg, but it is always the latter that marks the day, probably because of Lincoln’s famous address.

And there's also the eternal coastal media bias.

30 posted on 07/03/2013 11:48:39 AM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

I believe the 6th Wisconsin captured my wife’s GGgrandfather (55th NC) on July 1st. I don’t remember who opposed the 49th VA at Culp’s Hill. The brigade commander of the 49th was William Smith who was the Govenor-elect of Virginia when he fought at Gettysburg. He was not highly regarded as a commander and at Gettysburg the unit was to guard the left flank from a cavalry attack. On July 2nd, the unit did support the attack on Culp’s Hill.


31 posted on 07/03/2013 11:50:11 AM PDT by wfu_deacons
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To: Servant of the Cross

That is really awesome.


32 posted on 07/03/2013 11:52:02 AM PDT by februus
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To: februus

bing forever; google never.


33 posted on 07/03/2013 11:52:39 AM PDT by Servant of the Cross (the Truth will set you free)
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To: Servant of the Cross

That’s very poignant — I have been boycotting bing since a couple weeks ago their background was a panoply of rainbow flags.


34 posted on 07/03/2013 11:54:25 AM PDT by Wyrd bi ful ard (Gone Galt, 11/07/12----No king but Christ! Don't tread on me!)
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

Yeah, him too. But he was moving up till he brought up the desirability of emancipation and black soldiers. If the South was serious about wanting its independence.

The response of the Army, Davis and Congress was highly instructive. His career promptly stopped moving forward, despite his being by far the best officer in that particular army. Army of Tennessee, if I remember correctly.


35 posted on 07/03/2013 11:56:57 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: wfu_deacons

!

My GGrandfather fought at Culp’s Hill, 60th New York Infantry.


36 posted on 07/03/2013 11:59:46 AM PDT by reagandemocrat
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

“With a few exceptions, Confederate leadership in the west was nothing to Bragg about.”

Bragg earned his position at Shiloh, but time and again, from Perryville all the way to Franklin and Nashville, consistently missed opportunity after opportunity, and vastly over-estimated the forces against, and under-estimated his own.

The fog of war probably played a part, as did lack of good intelligence, but all of that is still debated.


37 posted on 07/03/2013 12:01:15 PM PDT by tcrlaf (Well, it is what the Sheeple voted for....)
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To: Sherman Logan
The fate of Cleburne refutes the current revisionist claim about motivation of the rebel political elite. As Howell Cobb said about Cleburne's proposal:

"If slaves will make good sol­diers, our whole the­ory of slav­ery is wrong."

38 posted on 07/03/2013 12:07:35 PM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Colonel Kangaroo

Cobb was right, as was Cleburne.


39 posted on 07/03/2013 12:09:38 PM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: tcrlaf
Bragg missed a tremendous golden opportunity in the Chickamauga campaign. There is no bigger “what if” in the war than what would have happened had Bragg chopped up Rosecrans piece by piece in the ridges and woods of northwest Georgia.
40 posted on 07/03/2013 12:15:23 PM PDT by Colonel Kangaroo
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To: Campion

I visited the line held by the 20th a couple of years ago. There were flowers on one point of the site then too. A lot of people remember and now add my son and his family to those who remember. I always tried to impress the importance of history on my sons and they have carried a lot of that forward.


41 posted on 07/03/2013 12:17:20 PM PDT by RJS1950 (The democrats are the "enemies foreign and domestic" cited in the federal oath)
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To: Wyrd bið ful aræd

SCARLETT
You’re a conceited, black- hearted varmint, Rhett
Butler, and I don’t know why I let you come and see
me.

RHETT
I’ll tell you why, Scarlett. Because I’m the only man
over sixteen and under sixty who’s around to show you
a good time. But cheer up, the war can’t last much
longer.

SCARLETT
Really, Rhett? Why?

RHETT
There’s a little battle going on right now, that
ought to pretty well fix things. One way or
the other.

SCARLETT
Oh, Rhett, is Ashley in it?

RHETT
So you still haven’t gotten the wooden headed Mr.
Wilkes out of your mind? Yes, I suppose he’s in it.

SCARLETT
Oh, tell me, Rhett, where is it?

RHETT
Some little town in Pennsylvania called Gettysburg.


42 posted on 07/03/2013 12:27:19 PM PDT by xp38
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To: reagandemocrat

Your Great Grand Father was in one hell of a fight. the 60th NY was part of General George (Pap) Green’s brigade. On the 2nd of July that brigade stopped Johnsons entire division in its tracks.


43 posted on 07/03/2013 12:50:37 PM PDT by X Fretensis
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To: reagandemocrat

The 60th NY fought the Stonewall Brigrade on July 3rd. I had GGuncle’s in the Stonewall Brigrade. My GGgrandfather’s unit, the 49th VA, faced the 2nd MA and 27th IND on July 3rd.


44 posted on 07/03/2013 12:56:30 PM PDT by wfu_deacons
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To: reagandemocrat

My GGF was there (Culp’s Hill), too, as an aide to BG Alpheus Williams, 1st Div, 12th Corps. He was also in the Cornfield at Antietam in ‘62. I had the chance to walk both battlefields 4 years ago. Very moving.......


45 posted on 07/03/2013 1:21:40 PM PDT by Reo (the 4th Estate is a 5th Column)
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To: Timber Rattler

No standard time either. Best guess is local solar time.


46 posted on 07/03/2013 1:24:31 PM PDT by reg45 (Barack 0bama: Implementing class warfare by having no class.)
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To: X Fretensis

Thanks for the info!

His portrait is mounted in my living room, and here is a site celebrating the dedication of George Greene’s Monument at Culp’s Hill in 1907.

http://www.slcha.org/cwrt/60reunion/reunion.php

(My GGF is seated near the middle)


47 posted on 07/03/2013 2:10:08 PM PDT by reagandemocrat
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To: Campion
20 A few years ago, I visited the battlefield and stood at the line defended by the 20th Maine on Little Round Top. Someone had placed fresh flowers there on the rocks. People still remember.

My family toured G'burg in 1971 when I was 16. I remember going into the G'burg Cyclorama. After viewing the displayed pictures I remember thinking these weren't dead Rebels and Yankees, they were dead Americans.

Have had the priviledge of seeing the paintings at both Cycloramas - Atlanta and Gettysburg. Very impressive and moving.

48 posted on 07/03/2013 2:34:54 PM PDT by MacNaughton
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To: GOP1959
26 ... my great-great grandfather Augustus Cristopj “Gus” Vogler who was a private in the NC 57th Infantry Co. D from Winston-Salem NC. ...

I thought I recognized the Vogler name. Seem to recall a chain of funeral homes in W-S with that name when I lived there 1981-1995.

49 posted on 07/03/2013 3:36:17 PM PDT by MacNaughton
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To: ReleaseTheHounds
28 You would at least think it would be carried on Turner Classic Movies channel, given it was a Turner production (one of the best things to come out or Turner Broadcasting).

Yeah, you would think so. I agree it was really well done. I noticed the History/Hitler/Reality Channel had a 1 hour show on Gettysburg at 2 p.m. today. Caught just a few minutes. They were really pushing the economics of slavery in the South. Wish I had seen more. Around 1995 I was kayaing on the Ocoee River in TN when I met a dentist from Atlanta. He told a story of going to the Fox Theater on Peachtree Street in Atlanta to see "Gettysburg" when it first showed. He said he went to the facility for some relief and recognized Ted Turner at the adjacent urinal. Beaking the man code, he said he complimented Turner on the film. Ted replied that it had been a long term project of his.

50 posted on 07/03/2013 3:42:53 PM PDT by MacNaughton
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