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Im Congreß, den 4ten July, 1776. Eine Erklärung durch die Repräsentanten der Vereinigten Staaten..
Pennsylvanischer Staatsbote ^ | July 5, 1776 | Constitutional Convention (translated)

Posted on 07/04/2013 9:55:12 PM PDT by Jeff Winston

I was wondering what the newspaper coverage was when the Declaration of Independence was signed. They DID have newspapers in those days!

I think the initial reaction was simply to print the Declaration in its entirety. The first newspaper to do so seems to have been the Pennsylvanischer Staatsbote, which printed the Declaration (in German translation) the next day, July 5, 1776.

Below is an image of that printing.

I would be interested to see other early coverage of the fact that Independence had been declared.


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: declaration; independence

1 posted on 07/04/2013 9:55:13 PM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston; Pharmboy

Very cool. Pinging our resident AmRev specialist.


2 posted on 07/04/2013 9:57:43 PM PDT by EDINVA
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To: EDINVA
Quick behind the Staatsbote was the Pennsylvania Evening Post, the next day, July 6, 1776:

It may be that the Staatsbote didn't print the entire thing. I've seen the Pennsylvania Evening Post credited with being the "first newspaper to print the entire Declaration of Independence."

3 posted on 07/04/2013 10:06:09 PM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston

Price only Two Coppers! :-)


4 posted on 07/04/2013 10:06:55 PM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston

Hmmm... looks like the whole thing to me (in the Staatsbote).

Obviously not an exact replica, though, being in German translation.


5 posted on 07/04/2013 10:08:12 PM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston
On Monday, July 8, the Declaration of Independence was "proclaimed" (read aloud) by Col. John Nixon of the Philadelphia Committee of Safety at the State House in Philadelphia.

It was also read again that evening before the militia on the Commons. Throughout the city, bells were rung all day.

On that day as well the Declaration was publicly read in Easton, Pennsylvania, and Trenton, New Jersey. It was these first public readings which constituted America's first celebrations of the Fourth of July.

Typically in towns and cities across the nation accompanying the oral declarations were loud shouts, huzzas, firings of muskets, and the tearing down of the British emblems.

In Baltimore, for example, on July 29, the town was illuminated and "the Effigy of our late King was carted through the town and committed to the flames amidst the acclamations of many hundreds. The just reward of a Tyrant."

6 posted on 07/04/2013 10:12:43 PM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston

The originals look more readable than the one that graced the Jackson Sun in their 7/4 edition. It was so blurry, I was afraid I’d suffered a minor stroke


7 posted on 07/05/2013 12:00:54 AM PDT by Figment
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To: Figment

Lol. And that’s LOW-RESOLUTION.


8 posted on 07/05/2013 12:09:17 AM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston

I’d be curious about what papers around the world had to say about it. France could be interesting since they were an ally but not exactly pushing freedom at home.


9 posted on 07/05/2013 3:00:03 AM PDT by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Jeff Winston

10 posted on 07/05/2013 3:05:27 AM PDT by JoeProBono (Mille vocibus imago valet;-{)
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To: Jeff Winston

simply would not do in American Journalism today where the Press tells the people what is fit to be “news” and does not trust the people to be able to interpret “facts” without journalistic spin.Today the press would have to have the politician-or their attorney/lobbyist write the interpretation and leave the Declaration to be printed for Government eyes only.


11 posted on 07/05/2013 4:10:46 AM PDT by StonyBurk (ring)
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To: Jeff Winston

Just think. The vote to establish a national language, as it were in the days of the Colonies, came down to either the English language, or the German language.

The English language won the vote, by a single vote!

“Ich bin ein Amerikaner!”

(With the published disdain and hatred Obama has for Europe, could you see him really speaking in German?)


12 posted on 07/05/2013 7:19:36 AM PDT by Terry L Smith
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To: Jeff Winston

Ja, Ich bin ein Stehsprechler!


13 posted on 07/05/2013 8:19:07 AM PDT by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: EDINVA; Jeff Winston; indcons; Chani; thefactor; blam; aculeus; ELS; Doctor Raoul; mainepatsfan; ...
Very cool indeed. Thanks for the post, JW, and the ping, EDINVA.

The RevWar/Colonial History/General Washington ping list...

And of course all of you know that the General did not sign because he was in NYC attempting to defend against an anticipated Brit attack. He had it read to his troops there on July 9.

14 posted on 07/05/2013 10:00:32 AM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
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To: Jeff Winston
Here's the first known Brit coverage:


15 posted on 07/05/2013 10:04:09 AM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
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To: Jeff Winston
Belfast's report:


16 posted on 07/05/2013 10:07:47 AM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
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To: Terry L Smith
Just think. The vote to establish a national language, as it were in the days of the Colonies, came down to either the English language, or the German language.

The English language won the vote, by a single vote!

Hmmm... Interesting. Appears to be an urban legend, though. :-)

17 posted on 07/05/2013 10:32:08 AM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Pharmboy
And of course all of you know that the General did not sign because he was in NYC attempting to defend against an anticipated Brit attack. He had it read to his troops there on July 9.

No, I didn't know that. Thanks for the contribution of your knowledge to the thread!

18 posted on 07/05/2013 10:34:51 AM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Pharmboy

THAT is extremely cool! Thanks!


19 posted on 07/05/2013 10:35:35 AM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Pharmboy
A few more details:

After first arriving in London on August 10, one of the first official British newspaper reports about the Declaration of Independence was published in the August 10 to 13, 1776, London Chronicle. While the full printing of the Declaration appeared four days later in the August 17 issue of the Chronicle, the August 13 issue features on page three a brief, but hugely significant and historically important breaking news announcement:

20 posted on 07/05/2013 10:38:57 AM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston; Pharmboy; EDINVA; indcons; Chani; thefactor; blam; aculeus; ELS; Doctor Raoul; ...

The Declaration of Independence was printed during the late afternoon on Thursday, July 4, by John Dunlap, a local Philadelphia printer.

Congress ordered that copies be sent “to the several Assemblies, Conventions, and Committees or Councils of Safety, and to the several Commanding officers of the Continental Troops, that it be proclaimed in each of the United States, and at the head of the Army.”

By the next morning copies were on their way to all thirteen states by horseback and on July 5 the German Pennsylvanischer Staatsbote, published by Heinrich Miller, became the new nations’s first newspaper to announce that the Declaration had been adopted .

On Saturday, July 6, the first newspaper print edition of the full text of the Declaration appeared in the Philadelphia Evening Post.

On Monday, July 8, the Declaration of Independence was “proclaimed” (read aloud) by Col. John Nixon of the Philadelphia Committee of Safety at the State House in Philadelphia. It was also read again that evening before the militia on the Commons. Throughout the city, bells were rung all day.

On that day as well the Declaration was publicly read in Easton, Pennsylvania, and Trenton, New Jersey.

It was these first public readings which constituted America’s first celebrations of the Fourth of July. Typically in towns and cities across the nation accompanying the oral declarations were loud shouts, huzzas, firings of muskets, and the tearing down of the British emblems.

In Baltimore, for example, on July 29, the town was illuminated and “the Effigy of our late King was carted through the town and committed to the flames amidst the acclamations of many hundreds. The just reward of a Tyrant.”


21 posted on 07/05/2013 10:54:12 AM PDT by Jeff Winston
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To: Jeff Winston

Wow. I grew up on the Pennsy side across from Trenton and now am in NC where last week saw an historical marker for one G Washington’s campaigns. Haven’t been able to go back and drive slower to photograph it, but I will!


22 posted on 07/05/2013 11:09:04 AM PDT by huldah1776
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To: JoeProBono
Wow, a high-res, digitally inserted photo in July 1776. Who would have thought?

BTW, the first commercial halftone printed photo was on December 2, 1873, about 100 years later.

In 1776, it would have been an etching.

23 posted on 07/05/2013 12:10:33 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Jeff Winston
Great stuff! Thanks for your further research and additions...

Freegards,
Pb

24 posted on 07/05/2013 12:57:25 PM PDT by Pharmboy (Democrats lie because they must.)
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To: Pharmboy

Man, that stylistic “f for lower-case s” thing makes for hard reading.

How would you print “It sucks...”?


25 posted on 07/05/2013 2:30:20 PM PDT by freedumb2003 (To attempt to have intercourse with a hornet's nest is a very bad idea)
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To: huldah1776

Just remember, while the War of Independence started in the North, it was won in the South, particularly in North Carolina.

The three battles that turned the tide of the war, King’s Mountain, Cowpens, and Guilford Courthouse were all fought within hours of Charlotte.


26 posted on 07/08/2013 8:41:35 PM PDT by AnalogReigns (because the real world is not digital...)
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To: Jeff Winston; BunnySlippers

PING!


27 posted on 07/08/2013 8:45:07 PM PDT by Graewoulf (Traitor John Roberts' Commune-Style Obama'care' violates U.S. Constitution AND Anti-Trust Law.)
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