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Bow and arrow forever changed ancient cultures
Columbus Dispatch (OH) ^ | 8-4-2013 | Bradley T. Lepper

Posted on 08/19/2013 6:27:17 AM PDT by Renfield

The invention of the bow and arrow allowed users to shoot projectiles more rapidly and more accurately than with the traditional spear.

A new theory argues that this innovation resulted in more than just a technological revolution. It also had profound social consequences wherever the bow was adopted.

Stony Brook University biologists Paul Bingham and Joanne Souza developed the “social-coercion hypothesis” as an explanation for the rise of social complexity. They recently outlined their work in the journal Evolutionary Anthropology.

According to this idea, the introduction of a more-effective weapon system gave social groups a safer, more-reliable way to coerce uncooperative individuals to support the efforts of the group or to seek another one somewhere else....

(Excerpt) Read more at dispatch.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science
KEYWORDS: agriculture; animalhusbandry; archaeology; godsgravesglyphs; joannesouza; paulbingham; varmintspam

1 posted on 08/19/2013 6:27:17 AM PDT by Renfield
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To: SunkenCiv

Ping


2 posted on 08/19/2013 6:27:38 AM PDT by Renfield (Turning apples into venison since 1999!)
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To: Renfield
The original super weapon on the planet was the atlatl, not the bow. The task to hand was killing hominids, particularly Neanderthals, and arrows would not have gotten them killed quickly enough...

neanderx800600 photo dvneanderx800600_zps5f095e0b.jpg
(www.themandus.org)

3 posted on 08/19/2013 6:38:08 AM PDT by varmintman
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To: Renfield
The original super weapon on the planet was the atlatl, not the bow. The task to hand was killing hominids, particularly Neanderthals, and arrows would not have gotten them killed quickly enough...

neanderx800600 photo dvneanderx800600_zps5f095e0b.jpg
(www.themandus.org)

4 posted on 08/19/2013 6:38:16 AM PDT by varmintman
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To: varmintman

Correct, but since your common knowledge wasn’t subject to peer review it can’t be considered science. You need peer review to take obvious observations and twist them into grandious sweeping conclusions.


5 posted on 08/19/2013 6:47:12 AM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: Renfield

And we needed these two to tell us that better weapons changes things.


6 posted on 08/19/2013 6:48:45 AM PDT by riverrunner
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To: Renfield
The invention of the bow and arrow allowed users to shoot projectiles more rapidly and more accurately than with the traditional spear.

I think the politically correct term is "assault bow".

7 posted on 08/19/2013 6:52:07 AM PDT by KarlInOhio (This message has been recorded but not approved by Obama's StasiNet. Read it at your peril.)
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To: riverrunner

Right, the author is saying something that we have known for a very long time.

Technology is married to politics.


8 posted on 08/19/2013 6:56:37 AM PDT by SMARTY ("The test of every religious, political, or educational system is the man that it forms." H. Amiel)
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To: Renfield

Another aspect of the bow, is it takes time to master it. This gives full-time warriors a big advantage over farmers who don’t have much time to practice archery.


9 posted on 08/19/2013 7:02:28 AM PDT by PapaBear3625 (You don't notice it's a police state until the police come for you.)
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To: Renfield

***These villages often were surrounded by a palisade or a ditch, and bodies buried at these sites frequently have arrowheads lodged in their bones, indicating that the bow and arrow were used as military weapons.****

But, but we’ve been taught for the last thirty five years that pre-Colombian culture was a paradise on earth, till the evil white men arrived!


10 posted on 08/19/2013 7:13:20 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need 7+ more ammo. LOTS MORE.)
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To: PapaBear3625
Another aspect of the bow, is it takes time to master it. This gives full-time warriors a big advantage over farmers who don’t have much time to practice archery.

I have years of experience in SCA combat. I can assure you that fighting with primitive melee weapons is an art to be mastered as well. Those who are new to the sport are trivially easy to defeat by the more experienced.

The article might not go into the depth of the study, but as far as I can tell from it, the study and maybe entire field seems an exercise in making vague speculations then interpreting them into whatever evidence you find. Any thinking person would readily expect that the invention of the bow would change things, like how people hunted or fought wars, which is what the evidence they spoke of showed. That part of the theory that is not obvious seems the part that is vague and un-testable, and that which remains pure speculation and hand waving.

11 posted on 08/19/2013 7:27:48 AM PDT by AndyTheBear
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To: PapaBear3625
Another aspect of the bow, is it takes time to master it. This gives full-time warriors a big advantage over farmers who don’t have much time to practice archery.

I have years of experience in SCA combat. I can assure you that fighting with primitive melee weapons is an art to be mastered as well. Those who are new to the sport are trivially easy to defeat by the more experienced.

The article might not go into the depth of the study, but as far as I can tell from it, the study and maybe entire field seems an exercise in making vague speculations then interpreting them into whatever evidence you find. Any thinking person would readily expect that the invention of the bow would change things, like how people hunted or fought wars, which is what the evidence they spoke of showed. That part of the theory that is not obvious seems the part that is vague and un-testable, and that which remains pure speculation and hand waving.

12 posted on 08/19/2013 7:27:53 AM PDT by AndyTheBear
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To: PapaBear3625

In England during the middle ages, a law was passed by Edward I compelling all able bodied males over the age of seven to practice archery every Sunday after church. The upshot was that the militia in every teown and village had longbowman, making them a fearsome resource for recruiting an army against the French or Scots, but also more able to cause a nuisance against the aristocracy. Some people say the prevalence of the armour piercing longbow amongst the common man enabled the development of England’s tradition of individual liberty, which the Americans later inherited.


13 posted on 08/19/2013 7:53:03 AM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: Renfield

Some society flourished without the bow, such as the Capellans. They relied heavily on the kligat, a type of boomerang.


14 posted on 08/19/2013 8:15:06 AM PDT by Sybeck1 (Marco is a good conservative. Rush and Mark tell me that everyday.)
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To: Renfield
There's no explicit mention in the article about how maybe the arrow allowed humans to hunt more efficiently, which in turn would have increased their food supply and allowed for larger populations.

Larger populations could have resulted in all sorts of changes to society, and the bow and arrow might have been only one of a myriad of technologies and/or social arrangements to have affected these cultures.

15 posted on 08/19/2013 8:17:06 AM PDT by who_would_fardels_bear
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To: Renfield

There are many twists and turns to this. For example, few woods make suitable bows, and even then, most can only be used to make “short bows”. If the bows are too long, they will break.

The exception is the Welsh or English longbow, made of Yew, that first made its appearance known in the 7th Century, but was still a strategic advantage over the short bow in the Battle of Agincourt (1415), best known for the Shakespeare play, Henry V.

Unfortunately for those in warmer and drier climates, though they obtained Yew bows, the wood soon dried out and they broke in ordinary use.

Back to primitive times, the use of bows and arrows was quite different on an individual basis, compared to the tactics of a group. With spears, the emphasis on the group was, for example, a single animal. But arrows were so efficient that as soon as an animal was down, the group could concentrate fire on another animal.

In turn, this forced some degree of nomadic behavior, as once animals were killed, they had to be processed on the spot before they rotted. This included tanning hides, smoking and grinding meat, carving bones into tools, etc.

And with human conflicts involving bows and arrows, spears and other weapons still played a major part.


16 posted on 08/19/2013 9:48:41 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Be Brave! Fear is just the opposite of Nar!)
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To: Renfield; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; ...

Thanks Renfield.

17 posted on 08/19/2013 3:04:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Renfield

James Burke figured that out over 30 years ago.

Connections
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TqnOo-KIh5Q


18 posted on 08/19/2013 3:06:35 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: sinsofsolarempirefan

i read that the draw weight of the english longbow was around 90 pounds making it a ferocious wep,

true?


19 posted on 08/19/2013 3:39:41 PM PDT by beebuster2000
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To: Renfield

WATCH VIDEO: http://youtu.be/IGcYGwqb3So

Mughal Conposite Bow and Horse Archery


20 posted on 08/19/2013 4:06:59 PM PDT by James C. Bennett (An Australian.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy; SunkenCiv
Be in their flowing cups freshly rememb’red.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne’er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remembered-
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now-a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs’d they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day.
21 posted on 08/19/2013 4:55:56 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: SunkenCiv; All

My hypothesis is that sex changed the world. Since the Neanderthal was bred out of existence, I theorize that folks who found a commonality in copulating were more inclined to view another tribe/group as sexual conquests, and who can argue with that?

I mean, what does ALL mankind have in common, no matter what country they come from?...SEX! Which is why spies are so vulnerable...and who is to say that libtards can’t be reasoned with and brought to an understanding? *kof-kof* That is, if one can bear “courting” a libtard. *hak-hak*

OK...I’m going to bed, now...alone...


22 posted on 08/19/2013 5:10:35 PM PDT by Monkey Face (Washington didn't use his right to free speech to defeat the British. He shot them.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
"For example, few woods make suitable bows, and even then, most can only be used to make “short bows”. If the bows are too long, they will break."

My copy of "The Traditional Boyer" begs to differ with you. They've made successful hunting bows with just about any kind of wood you care to name: Oak, elm, maple, hickory, ash, osage orange, even mulberry. I was very surprised by one of their tests showing a 6' maple bow launching arrows with greater force than a yew bow of similar length.

Another thing that surprised me was that one of the oldest bow fragments they found in England (going back a few thousand years, if I recall correctly) was about 6 ft. long, but it's limbs were flat, rather than the "D" shape of the traditional English (Welsh!) long bow. Apparently, the flat profile of the limbs lets them move more efficiently and impart greater speed to the arrow.

23 posted on 08/19/2013 5:38:40 PM PDT by Flag_This (Term limits.)
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To: colorado tanker

:’)


24 posted on 08/19/2013 7:27:49 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Monkey Face

It keeps changing the world, weird coincidence, about once a generation. ;')
The Neandertal Enigma
by James Shreeve

in local libraries
"Frayer's own reading of the record reveals a number of overlooked traits that clearly and specifically link the Neandertals to the Cro-Magnons. One such trait is the shape of the opening of the nerve canal in the lower jaw, a spot where dentists often give a pain-blocking injection. In many Neandertal, the upper portion of the opening is covered by a broad bony ridge, a curious feature also carried by a significant number of Cro-Magnons. But none of the alleged 'ancestors of us all' fossils from Africa have it, and it is extremely rare in modern people outside Europe." [pp 126-127]

25 posted on 08/19/2013 7:28:48 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Which is to say...WHAT? With the likes of Al Girly Boy, Zero and My-Tongue-Ran-Away-With-Me Biden, HomoSapien is lucky to even BE!!!!


26 posted on 08/19/2013 7:42:56 PM PDT by Monkey Face (Washington didn't use his right to free speech to defeat the British. He shot them.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Which is to say...WHAT? With the likes of Al Girly Boy, Zero and My-Tongue-Ran-Away-With-Me Biden, HomoSapien is lucky to even BE!!!!


27 posted on 08/19/2013 7:42:56 PM PDT by Monkey Face (Washington didn't use his right to free speech to defeat the British. He shot them.)
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To: Renfield
I'm kinda partial to this beauty I saw at Cabelas this afternoon:

28 posted on 08/19/2013 8:26:13 PM PDT by RandallFlagg (IRS = Internal Revenge Service)
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To: beebuster2000

Sometimes the draw weight exceeded 200lbs. Many male skeletons from the 1400-1500 period are instantly datable because they have deformed shoulders.


29 posted on 08/20/2013 4:30:52 AM PDT by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: Renfield

Duh!


30 posted on 08/20/2013 5:48:40 AM PDT by chesley (Vast deserts of political ignorance makes liberalism possible - James Lewis)
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