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WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 35 AUGUST 30, 2013
Free Republic | August 30, 2013 | greeneyes

Posted on 08/30/2013 1:16:25 PM PDT by greeneyes

The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you.

This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread ... there is no telling where it will go and that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!

NOTE: This is a once a week ping list. We do post to the thread during the week. Links to related articles and discussions which might be of interest are welcomed, so feel free to post them at any time.


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: agriculture; food; gardening; hobby
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Greeting from Missouri. We are enjoying typical hot Missouri weather today. Not as bad as we have seen, at just 90 degrees, but still not like the cooler days we were enjoying.

Back from the windy city. Attended lots of training sessions from 8am to 6pm,then came supper, and a walk over to my hotel to get in before dark. No strolling around dowtown Chicago after dark, for this gal-I have better sense than that. So tired I would go immediately asleep, then wake up about 3 hours wide awake. So I'd drink a little herbal tea, review conference materials, make notes and action plans. Finally I would wind down a bit and go back to sleep about 3am, and then up at 6pm. Eat breakfast, clean up and stroll over to the conference site by 8am to do it again.

Someone asked me if I was having fun. LOL I didn't go there to have fun, and I didn't really have any. I had great suppers, and learned a lot of sutff, that will translate into lots of work to do for my volunteer work. I would say the conference was necessary, informative, and useful, but FUN-I'd rather be almost anywhere else for fun. LOL

Sorry I did not get to answer all your posts from last weeks thread. There was an issue with truncation, so I answere the ones I had. I promise I wasn't ignoring anyone.LOL

Garden did not do so well while I was gone. It was pretty droopy, and needed some immediate watering. Some of the perennials may not come back they got so dry.

Cukes and cantaloupes have succumbed to some sort of wilt. They will have to be pulled and taken to the burn pile. I'll have to do some research to see what happened to them, and whether there is anything I can do for next year.

I may have to just grow them in containers with new potting mix next few years, since I have a feeling the soil is now infected with spores or something.

Almond Tree produced some fruit. It looks just like a peach. There is a pit inside that looks like a peach. Cracked the pit, and there was a beautiful almond. The fruit wasn't quite ripe. Now I'm thinking phewy on youey peaches. I got me some almonds, and the fruit is just peachy enough to be a great peach substitute, and I get almonds, a great source of vitamnin E, to boot.

Just maybe this is a superior tree for our limited acre fruits and nuts from the same tree.LOL

Hope you are all doing well, Have a great weekend, and God Bless.

1 posted on 08/30/2013 1:16:25 PM PDT by greeneyes
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To: greeneyes

You might have had vine borers in your cukes and cantaloupes.

Not unheard of. One of our neighbors lost every cucumber to vine borers one year.


2 posted on 08/30/2013 1:19:05 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: greeneyes

Oh, what variety almond/peach is that? I’ve seen one at Starks but have been too chicken to order it.


3 posted on 08/30/2013 1:19:47 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: greeneyes; Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; ...

Pinging the List.


4 posted on 08/30/2013 1:29:56 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Black Agnes

You could be right. IIRC it started on a leaf higher up rather than on the ground, and spread like wild fire.


5 posted on 08/30/2013 1:31:12 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

I didn’t grow cukes this year but when I do I take DE in one of those little snot puller bulb thingies you use with infants and puff the DE under the leaves and on the vine of the cukes.

Have to repeat after rain or a heavy dew.


6 posted on 08/30/2013 1:32:55 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

Well, I am not too sure. I thing it was called hardy almond. We were looking in the nut tree sections of several catalogs and ordered 2 or 3 which didn’t survive the winter.

So we oredered some more and planted them in another part of the yard and they survived. None of them were advertised as being fruit trees. They were just plain ole hardy almonds.

Hubby came in and said looky here our almond tree has turned into a peach tree. He cut the fruit and found what looked like a fruit pit. Well maybe there was a mixup we thought and they sent us a peach tree?

So I said split the stone pit and she what’s inside, and there it was-an almond nut. That is the extent of what I know. Gonna have to put it on the winter research list.LOL


7 posted on 08/30/2013 1:36:33 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Black Agnes

Thanks for that tip. I’ll try to remember it for next year.


8 posted on 08/30/2013 1:37:23 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

I got busy this year and only planted potatoes. They seem to be doing well. I need to start digging up some and using them.


9 posted on 08/30/2013 1:39:12 PM PDT by MtnClimber (If I had a city it would look like Detroit - BHZer0)
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To: greeneyes

she=see please forgive all my typos and transpostions, my fingers don’t always type what I am thinking in the right order, I try to catch it before posting, but don’t always.


10 posted on 08/30/2013 1:41:22 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

It all started innocently... I burned myself in the kitchen and gritched to my daughter that I needed an Aloe Vera, since my last ones had died in the nuclear summer of '11.

So she got one from her grandmother (my ex-mother-in-law) and brought it to me.

It had little ones, so I transplanted them to pots. And then there were more little ones, and I transplanted them to pots.

These things are reproducing like tribbles.

/johnny

11 posted on 08/30/2013 1:42:14 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: MtnClimber

Mine are ready to dig too. They aren’t as large as I had hoped, but they are great tasting, and will make some beautiful potato skin appetizers.

I neglected to build up the soil/hay as much as I should, and I failed to water them a few times when I was busy and should have.

Pretty good results, though for my first try with potatoes. I plant a patch next year too, I think.


12 posted on 08/30/2013 1:44:50 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

LOL. That’s the trouble with tribbles. Reproduction is abundant.LOL


13 posted on 08/30/2013 1:46:14 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Want to plant lettuce seeds this weekend here in DFW for the Fall. Never tried a Fall planting—its been so hot here I’m concerned that any seedlings wont be able to handle the heat if they sprout at all.
Should I wait a week or two for it to cool down somewhat before planting the seeds?


14 posted on 08/30/2013 1:59:33 PM PDT by tflabo (Truth or Tyranny)
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To: tflabo
I won't be planting lettuce until the middle of October (or when nighttime temps dip into the low 60s) here on the west side of DFW.

/johnny

15 posted on 08/30/2013 2:01:15 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Do you plant seedlings or transplants? Texas A&M was recommending no later than Sept 15th for this area (DFW) but if planted in October do you cover them up in late November when the cold comes around?


16 posted on 08/30/2013 2:07:24 PM PDT by tflabo (Truth or Tyranny)
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To: greeneyes

The inner nut of the peach and apricot pits are related to almonds. The kernels of apricot and peach pits have a similar flavor and the same toxic effect (destroyed by heating) as bitter almonds.


17 posted on 08/30/2013 2:07:34 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: tflabo
Want to plant lettuce seeds this weekend here in DFW for the Fall.

I planted lettuce that is in seed tape on August 21st. It's up, and I wil probably stick with seed tape over seeds in the future..

The seedlings are all so perfectly spaced, and in a perfectly straight line..unlike when I plant seed.

18 posted on 08/30/2013 2:12:54 PM PDT by sockmonkey (Of Course I didn't read the article. After all, this is FreeRepublic..)
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To: tflabo
I've got a cold-frame that I'll set up over them when it starts getting really cold. I can generally have lettuce all through the winter.

Yes, they will be tiny little seedlings. I don't direct sow anything, actually.

/johnny

19 posted on 08/30/2013 2:13:25 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: greeneyes
MDC is asking for comments on the deer population hereabouts.
I'd say we have too damned many of them.

A doe ate most of one of the walnut trees I planted this spring. It was doing every well, with a mate nearby. The leaves were vacuumed off. Just damn !

20 posted on 08/30/2013 2:22:20 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: JRandomFreeper; sockmonkey; greeneyes; All

Still have some Spring planted arugula growing out back lasting all through the summer. I harvested seeds from the bolted ones and now have seedlings in egg carton shells that germinated in 3 days. Pretty hardy stuff to last so long in high heat. Now I’ll wait to transplant the new seedlings in cooler temps—thanks for all the advice.


21 posted on 08/30/2013 2:23:27 PM PDT by tflabo (Truth or Tyranny)
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To: JRandomFreeper

My wife has three “Earth Boxes” on a cart. She has lettuce growing well into the winter, both fall and spring, as we pull the cart out when possible and into the heated garage when it freezes.


22 posted on 08/30/2013 2:26:05 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: greeneyes
This weeks pretty photo from the garden:

 photo lilyrose.jpg

23 posted on 08/30/2013 2:26:41 PM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: greeneyes; All
And now (cough) for something really different.

The subject: salvia officianalis. The story: raised in largish pot, grew very well, trimmed top leaves and, at 5-6 inches in height, was bushing out nicely on the lower stem.

Transplanted it to about 30" away from my best salvia plant. VERY carefully -- I'd be shocked to find that the roots were damaged in the process (although my x-ray vision is on the fritz...). Saw to it being well-watered for about a week (longer is dubious here, see below), with a bit of 12-24-12.

Temps are 65-80 F., occasionally a little warmer, no 90s (we're up at 2900 feet alt.) Roughly half-sun, half-shade, just as the other plant...and it is now losing its smaller leaves and drooping. No leaf damage from insects. Not dying (yet), but not healthy at all, still making new leaves, though more slowly than before.

The locale: El Valle de Anton, Cocle province, Panama. No frost concerns, ever. June-November is the rainy season here, and it is a typical one; very little add-on watering required in the garden.

Its plant mate (er, so to speak) is just chugging along, very healthy, and should end up being a fine sage plant.

The only garden pests of note are ants and wasps (very benign ones; you leave them alone, they leave you alone). I have not heard of ants chewing on sage roots, but I suppose anything is possible.

Thoughts? Ideas? Outright laughter? All notions appreciated, with the exception that I prefer NOT to use organophosphates for any reason.

Many TIA, gardeners!

24 posted on 08/30/2013 2:34:06 PM PDT by SAJ
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Air rifles, Eric, m’FRiend...air rifles.


25 posted on 08/30/2013 2:37:12 PM PDT by SAJ
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To: greeneyes; JRandomFreeper; rightly_dividing; Travis McGee; All

Report of marvelous results so far, thanks to four foot long grow lamp.
I planted these seeds last Sunday. Grow lamp stays on until I go to bed, then turn it on when I get up the next day. I planted two paper cups of each variety of seed with several seeds in each cup. If the seed was so small it was almost microscopic, I just put “some” in each one. The seeds that have sprouted and ones that haven’t yet:
Sprouted:
Giant Zinnia – both cups (these Zinnia seeds were sent free to me by a seed company when I bought other stuff from them)
Green Beans – both cups
Lettuce – both cups
Brussels Sprouts – both cups
Cucumber – both cups
Turnips – both cups

Not sprouted yet:
Baby carrots – none
Regular onion – none
Regular squash – none

The Egyptian Walking Onions are now planted in a long planter in the dirt garden. I took out a good part of the regular dirt in the planter and replaced it with fresh potting soil mix. Placed the onions about a foot apart in there, watered it, put row cover over all of it, used metal spikes to secure the cover to the ground up and down the planter so the squirrels can’t remove it.

While I was out there, I opened the envelope of mixed flowers that attract hummingbirds and butterflies, and sprinkled them along the ground in a spot about three feet long, put a dab of dirt on top, watered it and put row cover over that, using the stakes again to secure that one. Those damned squirrels and birds are NOT going to murder what I just did. This is absolute war between them and me and I aim to win, blast their murdering hides.

I have to have more grow bags for these new developing plants, and ordered some cheap ones and they should be here by next week.

The “T” Italian squash in the barrel is about a foot and a half tall, swell looking. The sesame flower plant is over two feet tall. Tomatoes in tomato planter with trellis are fine as well as five others in 5 gal. grow bags. I have another large tomato planter with trellis and I can transplant some of those five if I buy more potting soil which I have to do anyway. Sweet potato plants (3) in 10 gallon grow bag have beautiful lush green leaves just growing every where. I think they would be dead by now if they were in the dirt garden for murdering insects would have already destroyed them. A pox on garden dirt insects.

Strawberry plants in little pots still haven’t come – need to contact that company.

That’s all from Marcella’s Food Plant Container Farm :o)


26 posted on 08/30/2013 2:39:37 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: greeneyes

That almond plant. Is it supposed to be a large tree or a regular plant?


27 posted on 08/30/2013 2:44:05 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Red_Devil 232

Well that’s good to know.Thanks.

Now, do you know: We planted what was labeled as almonds. The fruit now looks like peaches. Is that normal for the almond tree to have fruit that looks like peaches?


28 posted on 08/30/2013 2:56:55 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: sockmonkey

If you are going to be saving heirloom seeds, you can make your own seed tape. It’s pretty easy. You can use paper towels or toilet paper.

Put a length on the table and mark with dots next to the spot for a seed. Put down the seeds,Use a paste of flour and water to glue the tape on each side of the seeds, and fold over the half of the paper and secure with the paste on each side of the seed as well as the edge.

Proceed to plant just like the ones you buy.


29 posted on 08/30/2013 3:02:06 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Well, yes that’s true for many of us. I was just talking to friend of ours on Wednesday. They totally ravage her garden-she lives out of town in the woods. Nothing has worked so far that she has tryed.

We are just a mile out side of town and close enough that we just don’t have problems with deer. We do have the smaller varmits and critters. The worst of which is a family or two of coons.


30 posted on 08/30/2013 3:05:27 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: tflabo

I have lettuce ready to harvest the seeds that I need to get to soom also.


31 posted on 08/30/2013 3:06:50 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: gorush

Thanks for sharing. Love those pics of flowers.LOL


32 posted on 08/30/2013 3:07:57 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: tflabo
Still have some Spring planted arugula growing out back lasting all through the summer.

Probably eight years ago, I had arugula that went to seed. It was like dandelions all over the yard for about three years. I kept thinking..At the grocery store, this would be about 800 dollars worth.

Since, to me, arugula doesn't taste that good, I was not unhappy when it finally got killed off by the drought.

33 posted on 08/30/2013 3:08:49 PM PDT by sockmonkey (Of Course I didn't read the article. After all, this is FreeRepublic..)
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To: greeneyes

I’m encouraged to order the Starks one then. It’s supposedly useable as both. You eat the peaches and then you can eat the pits/almonds too.


34 posted on 08/30/2013 3:10:21 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: tflabo

I got lettuce to sprout one year when it was really hot still by planting it inside. Once it sprouted I put it outside in the shade/dappled sun under a tree.

YMMV.


35 posted on 08/30/2013 3:11:33 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: greeneyes

Here’s the one I was thinking of:

http://www.starkbros.com/products/fruit-trees/apricot-trees/stark-sweetheart-apricot


36 posted on 08/30/2013 3:16:24 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: SAJ
I own a .50 cal air rifle. It will punch a .495 round ball clear through most any critter it encounters, east-west or north-south.
37 posted on 08/30/2013 3:20:54 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: Black Agnes

Yep Aggie—I think thats gonna fly with me too. I have an east facing window for morning sun and got some lettuce seedlings there. I was going to direct plant to the soil and use the seedlings as a backup. Upon johnny’s advice I will wait for cooler temps instead of this North Tx oven. I’m about to plant Black Seeded Simpson lettuce seeds in another egg shell carton. First time but I read and hear its a pretty good hardy producer of loose leaf lettuce. It goes under the shade tree in the ring below too.


38 posted on 08/30/2013 3:24:38 PM PDT by tflabo (Truth or Tyranny)
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To: tflabo

The red lettuces are also hardy.

Here’s a list of hardy winter temps and veggies that can take it:

http://www.southernexposure.com/southern-exposures-fallwinter-gardening-guide-ezp-38.html

Scroll.


39 posted on 08/30/2013 3:26:12 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Black Agnes

“Here’s the one I was thinking of:”

I just read that and, according to the species, they grow from 12 to 20 feet tall and they are wide.

It says the “hull” that peach looking outer “fruit” is discarded when they harvest the almonds. Are they discarding something good to eat because they just want almonds and nothing else?


40 posted on 08/30/2013 3:27:27 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: Marcella

I’m thinking the ‘peach’ part of that fruit is probably bitter and/or not palatable or sweet.

I could be wrong.

Maybe you could feed it to chickens or pigs?


41 posted on 08/30/2013 3:29:36 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: gorush

“My wife has three “Earth Boxes” on a cart.”

That’s a good idea. Another type container for my container deck farm.


42 posted on 08/30/2013 3:30:02 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.)
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To: SAJ

It’s a mystery. It could just be a little transplant shock being in a new environment. Don’t treat it too kind. I have killed more plant with over fertilization and over watering than through neglect.

Do keep an eye out for any bugs on the leaves etc maybe even use a magnifying glass. Sometimes when I transplant stuff, I deliberately take off some of the bottom leaves, because I figure that will help the remaining leaves to survive. I could be mistaken, but that is what I do.

I also don’t want to risk burning from fertilizer, so I usually use slow release osmote type pellets when I transplant.


43 posted on 08/30/2013 3:30:05 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Marcella

IIRC, it is hall’s hardy almond tree. It may have been a dwarf tree. When given a choice, we get the dwarfs because we only have an acre and the house and play yard take up quite a bit of that space.


44 posted on 08/30/2013 3:34:01 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Black Agnes

I would do that if I were you. My daughter planted some almond trees that she got from the Aborative Society. She claimed they turned into peach trees. They were in her front yard, and she thought they cross pollinated with the peaches from the back yard.

Any way, we picked a bunch of them and took with us on vacation. They tasted great just like peaches. We didn’t even think to bust the pits and see what was inside.


45 posted on 08/30/2013 3:40:31 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: sockmonkey

I don’t care for arugula either, but my daughter loves the stuff.


46 posted on 08/30/2013 3:41:10 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Black Agnes; tflabo

Last year-hottest since 1956 here in Missouri. I got black seeded simpson to sprout and grow in the summer. Planted toward the end of June in a rectangular planter, so I could bring it in if I needed to.

It was in the shade of a tree during the hottest part of the day. I just watered it a little morning and night, and had lettuce all summer and fall till I pulled it out to dump in the compost heap and plant the fall/winter garden.


47 posted on 08/30/2013 3:46:29 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Black Agnes

OOOOHHHH. That sounds great. I may have to try one too, if our budget next year allows it.LOL


48 posted on 08/30/2013 3:50:25 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
We are just a mile out side of town and close enough that we just don’t have problems with deer.

Here, in town, in Central TX, I've hit two deer, and they think my front flower beds are their salad bar.

They've even come onto the front porch to eat flowers in big pots.

49 posted on 08/30/2013 3:54:45 PM PDT by sockmonkey (Of Course I didn't read the article. After all, this is FreeRepublic..)
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To: tflabo

Do you plant seedlings or transplants?

I remember several years ago reading (in Organic Gardening, or somewhere) about a person that sprinkled the lettuce seed on the snow, with the ground worked up under-in late winter when the weather had settled, going on early spring— When the snow melted, the seed rooted and took off. I have always wanted to try that but have never had snow at the right time. Obviously it would be late winter to do that.


50 posted on 08/30/2013 4:20:03 PM PDT by handmade
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