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The salt conundrum: Sodium bad, chloride good
TORONTO SUN ^ | SEPTEMBER 8, 2013 | QMI AGENCY

Posted on 09/08/2013 11:44:17 AM PDT by rickmichaels

Consuming less salt is widely seen as an important step in reducing heart disease and hypertension.

But a new study from the University of Glasgow says low levels of chloride, salt's other constituent, in the blood is an indicator of mortality risk in people with hypertension.

After analyzing data from almost 13,000 patients with high blood pressure, followed up over 35 years, the researchers say they found that low levels of chloride was associated with a higher risk of death and cardiovascular disease.

The group with the lowest level of chloride in their blood had a 20% higher mortality rate compared to the other subjects, the team concluded.

"Sodium is cast as the villain for the central role it plays in increasing the risk of high blood pressure, with chloride little more than a silent extra in the background," Dr. Sandosh Padmanabhan of the Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences said in a statement.

"However, our study has put the spotlight on this under-studied chemical to reveal an association between low levels of chloride serum in the blood and a higher mortality rate, and surprisingly this is in the opposite direction to the risks associated with high sodium.

"It is likely that chloride plays an important part in the physiology of the body and we need to investigate this further."

Chloride is already measured as part of routine clinical screening and so monitoring of chloride levels could easily be incorporated into clinical practice to identify individuals at high risk, the researchers say.


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 09/08/2013 11:44:17 AM PDT by rickmichaels
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To: rickmichaels

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2012/02/17/dangers-of-salt-restriction.aspx


2 posted on 09/08/2013 11:48:13 AM PDT by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: rickmichaels
My buddy's blood pressure is up...Doctor says to stop all salt so he doesn't retain water. She doesn't know about the 10 beers he drinks every night. Yes...he's an alcoholic.

So he's gung ho to cut out all salt. What's the problem?? Most people don't tell their doctor everything.

3 posted on 09/08/2013 11:52:44 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: gorush

Very interesting.


4 posted on 09/08/2013 11:54:43 AM PDT by rickmichaels
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To: rickmichaels
I can see where this is going...We'll soon be told to drink something like Pediacare every day.

It's like all that very expensive protein stuff. People are being scared to death about eating real food with real fat with real protein.

If kids drank milk instead of soda they'd be a lot better off....and some meat with their vegies wouldn't hurt either.

5 posted on 09/08/2013 11:57:51 AM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: rickmichaels

Is potassium chloride (common salt substitute) not a solution to this problem?


6 posted on 09/08/2013 12:01:13 PM PDT by posterchild
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To: Sacajaweau

Meat, milk, butter, cheese: The foundation of a healthy diet.


7 posted on 09/08/2013 12:03:06 PM PDT by rickmichaels
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To: gorush
Your pro-salt article ends with a warning not to consume table salt or salt in processed foods. That's where the vast majority of salt in the American diet comes from. What is the market share of sea salt? 3%? The rest is bad stuff.

We need from 300mg to 800mg of sodium per day, depending upon our level of activity. Sodium is present in all animal products, such as meat, milk and eggs. A serving of steak contains around 300mg of sodium, a day's requirement for most people.

8 posted on 09/08/2013 12:04:56 PM PDT by Kennard
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To: posterchild

Yes, in low doses, but in high doese, it’s also the 3rd chemical administered in the lethal injection process:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_chloride#Precautions


9 posted on 09/08/2013 12:08:44 PM PDT by carriage_hill (Peace is that brief glorious moment in history, when everybody stands around reloading.)
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To: posterchild
Is potassium chloride (common salt substitute) not a solution to this problem?

Yes.

Some manufacturers produce a blend of potassium chloride and sea salt, which has a taste virtually identical to table salt. Also, sea salt has more flavor per mg of sodium than table salt, so you end up with a product that tastes just like table salt with one-third the sodium.

10 posted on 09/08/2013 12:10:14 PM PDT by Kennard
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To: Kennard

http://www.cargill.com/salt/wcm/groups/public/@cseg/@salt/documents/document/na3051787.pdf


11 posted on 09/08/2013 12:15:30 PM PDT by Kennard
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To: rickmichaels
I'm 70. Weigh the same as when I was 17..though I am a tad shorter. I consider myself very fortunate...with some good genes...but still eat just like my parents. Mom lived to 90...Dad would have lived longer (bleeding ulcer) but there was no surgeon in the hick town to care for him. My grandparents all lived into their 80's. These were all farm people....and it meant...you eat what you grow.

I remember the pigs and the cow and the bull and ducks and grape vines and digging up potatoes, beans and huge tomatoes etc etc. No soda, no snacks....real homemade food.

12 posted on 09/08/2013 12:16:09 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Kennard

I believe in iodized salt. To me....sea salt is unclean.


13 posted on 09/08/2013 12:17:36 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Sacajaweau

Read the last couple of paragraphs of the article linked in post 2.


14 posted on 09/08/2013 12:21:22 PM PDT by Kennard
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To: rickmichaels

It’s time consuming and tedious, but I take my salt and slice each individual salt particle in half. I throw away the Sodium halves but keep the chloride halves to use as my seasoning. /sarc


15 posted on 09/08/2013 12:30:11 PM PDT by House Atreides ( D)
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To: Sacajaweau

I’ve seen where they make sea salt in Frisco Bay. I’ll take the very old mined salt any day over sea salt.


16 posted on 09/08/2013 12:31:58 PM PDT by Cold Heart
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To: rickmichaels

I suggest eliminating artificially modified salts like morton’s.

Consume as much sea salt - naturally dried or harvested Himalayan salt as you prefer.


17 posted on 09/08/2013 12:46:20 PM PDT by aMorePerfectUnion (The more corrupt the state, the more numerous the laws - Tacituss)
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To: Sacajaweau
She doesn't know about the 10 beers he drinks every night.

A simple blood test would detect that.

18 posted on 09/08/2013 12:51:36 PM PDT by fso301
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To: Kennard

It’s all about marketing...yogurt, bean sprouts, organic vegies which only means they used real sh** on your food etc etc.


19 posted on 09/08/2013 12:53:51 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: House Atreides

Love it...


20 posted on 09/08/2013 12:55:03 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: fso301

nope....


21 posted on 09/08/2013 12:55:41 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Sacajaweau

... or eat some celery if you don’t like sea salt. Celery has lots of sodium with none of the artifacts present in processed table salt.


22 posted on 09/08/2013 1:00:09 PM PDT by Kennard
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To: rickmichaels

“Salt, We Misjudged You” New York Times

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2891182/posts

For those who are concerned about their salt consumption. Surprising article, considering the source.

Hint: Generally, if you want to live, avoid low salt diets.


23 posted on 09/08/2013 1:05:49 PM PDT by Balding_Eagle (SWAT stands for Storing Weapons for patriots to Attack Tyranny.)
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To: rickmichaels

How do you separate sodium intake from chloride intake?

In high school our chemistry teacher showed us a video of what happens when pure sodium metal is immersed in water (it reacts very violently) then asked, “Would you want to put sodium on your food?”


24 posted on 09/08/2013 1:08:26 PM PDT by elcid1970 ("The Second Amendment is more important than Islam.")
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To: rickmichaels

The essential blood salts (ionized electrolytes):

Sodium (Na). A positively charged electrolyte that helps to balance fluid levels in the body and facilitates neuromuscular functioning.

Potassium (K). A main component of cellular fluid, this positive electrolyte helps to regulate neuromuscular function and osmotic pressure.

Calcium (Ca). A cation, or positive electrolyte, that affects neuromuscular performance and contributes to skeletal growth and blood coagulation.

Magnesium (Mg). Influences muscle contractions and intracellular activity. A cation.

Chloride (CI). An anion, or negative electrolyte, that regulates blood pressure.

Phosphate (HPO4). Negative electrolyte that impacts metabolism and regulates acid-base balance and calcium levels.

Bicarbonate (HCO3). A negatively charged electrolyte that assists in the regulation of blood pH levels. Bicarbonate insufficiencies and elevations cause acid-base disorders (i.e., acidosis, alkalosis).

Lesser blood salts:

Copper
Zinc
Manganese
Chromium


25 posted on 09/08/2013 1:21:32 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (The best War on Terror News is at rantburg.com)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
This entire "eat this or die" frenzy is all about marketing.

There's more friggin' cooking shows and Bobby's pots and pans and Martha's dishes....

The only show I do enjoy is hell's kitchen...These kids are truly being challenged. There are no recipe cards on the counter...

I can still remember Julie Child explaining a capon....

26 posted on 09/08/2013 1:28:25 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Kennard

So I should put celery on my French fries?


27 posted on 09/08/2013 1:32:01 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Sacajaweau

No. You put celery on your frozen driveway.


28 posted on 09/08/2013 1:39:21 PM PDT by donhunt (Certified and proud "Son of a Bitch".)
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To: donhunt

Thanks for the laugh...I needed that!!


29 posted on 09/08/2013 1:46:26 PM PDT by Sacajaweau
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To: Sacajaweau

Yes, celery will add crunchy texture and an interesting flavor mix to your french fries. I’ve tried it with sweet potatoes fries and it was tasty.


30 posted on 09/08/2013 1:53:27 PM PDT by Kennard
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To: rickmichaels

Grandpa: Well let me tell you something now, Johnny. Last Thursday, I turned 95 years old. And I never exercised a day in my life. Every morning, I wake up, and I smoke a cigarette. And then I eat five strips of bacon. And for lunch, I eat a bacon sandwich. And for a midday snack?

John: Bacon.

Grandpa: Bacon! A whole damn plate! And I usually drink my dinner. Now according to all of them flat-belly experts, I should’ve took a dirt nap like thirty years ago. But each year comes and goes, and I’m still here. Ha! And they keep dyin’. You know? Sometimes I wonder if God forgot about me. Just goes to show you, huh?

John: What?

Grandpa: Huh?

John: Goes to show you what?

Grandpa: Well it just goes... what the hell are you talkin’ about?

John: Well you said you drink beer, you eat bacon and you smoke cigarettes, and you outlive most of the experts.

Grandpa: Yeah?

John: I thought maybe there was a moral.

Grandpa: No, there ain’t no moral. I just like that story. That’s all. Like that story.


31 posted on 09/08/2013 2:05:38 PM PDT by Manic_Episode (Some days...it's just not worth chewing through the leather straps....)
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

thanks rickmichaels.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ae/Sucralose2.svg/200px-Sucralose2.svg.png


32 posted on 09/08/2013 2:57:19 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: rickmichaels

The best salt out there on the market is Celtic Sea Salt.


33 posted on 09/08/2013 4:14:40 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine (I’m not a Republican, I'm a Conservative! Pubbies haven't been conservative since before T.R.)
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To: neverdem

ping


34 posted on 09/08/2013 8:49:43 PM PDT by GOPJ (Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts - Churchill)
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To: rickmichaels
Don't forget.............


35 posted on 09/08/2013 8:53:56 PM PDT by Daffynition (Life's short- paddle hard!)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Aren’t we supposed to use Iodized salt?

Because iodine deficiency was once a persistent problem in some parts of the U.S., manufacturers began adding iodine to table salt in 1924. Iodine deficiency remains a serious problem in Africa and parts of Asia but has been largely eliminated in the developed world, where people routinely get the iodine they need from other food sources.

That and flouride....we need our daily doses.


36 posted on 09/08/2013 8:58:37 PM PDT by Daffynition (Life's short- paddle hard!)
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To: Sacajaweau

Sea salt is great and needed for many things in the body! It is the refined salt that is bad!


37 posted on 09/08/2013 9:00:27 PM PDT by fabian (" And a new day will dawn for those who stand long, and the forests will echo in laughter")
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To: Daffynition

Iodine is tricky, because while only a tiny amount, 100-200 micrograms is needed daily, twice that amount for pregnant women, according to US standards, other chemicals tend to neutralize its effects.

That is, chlorine, fluoride and bromide lower iodine levels in the body by blocking iodine receptors, and they are increasingly common in our diets.

In comparison, the Japanese consume an average of more than 12 milligrams (12,000 mcg) of iodine per day. That’s 50 times more than the average American.

Beyond thyroid support, iodine’s anti-cancer functions may be its most important benefit. Scientific tests using estrogen sensitive breast cancer cells exposed to iodine have shown that they are less likely to grow and spread.

Fibrocystic breast disease creates swelling, tenderness and discomfort. In one study, 98 percent of women receiving iodine treatment were pain-free by the study’s end, and 72 percent had improvements in breast tissue.

The bottom line is that it is still a trace element, several of which are vital to good health, but are not major blood electrolytes. That is, if your electrolytes are imbalanced, you might quickly die; but if you have a severe shortage of a trace element, while you might develop serious medical conditions, it will take a while.


38 posted on 09/09/2013 6:16:01 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (The best War on Terror News is at rantburg.com)
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