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New passage-tomb discovery in Boyne Valley [Ireland]
Past Horizons ^ | Friday, September 13, 2013 | David Connolly

Posted on 09/15/2013 7:02:53 AM PDT by SunkenCiv

Details of the “first passage-tomb to be discovered in in Boyne Valley in 200 years” have been reported in the Sept 7 edition of the Meath Chronicle. It was discovered by the Heritage Council Funded ‘Boyne Valley Landscapes Project’, a collaborative research project led by researchers from University College Dublin (Dr Stephen Davis and Dr Will Megarry) and Dundalk Institute of Technology (Dr Conor Brady).

The newly discovered passage-tomb, on the floodplain of the Boyne southwest of Newgrange, had showed up in the lidar surface as a low rise, a mere 25cm high and 30m across, surrounded by a barely visible enclosure 130m in diameter. The site was originally designated LP2 (Low Profile) by the research team, but is now recorded as an embanked enclosure (the Irish equivalent to a henge monument), SMR no. ME019-094.

Geophysical survey using magnetic gradiometry and resistivity was then carried out, and confirmed the weakly defined outer enclosure in addition to a distinct passage/chamber arrangement, with the passage aligned towards the north-northeast on the Newgrange ridge.

Archaeologists have been excited about the central mound, which they said “appears to show a clear passage and chamber arrangement with splayed terminals at the NNE. The central mound is clearly identifiable and measures c. 30m in diameter. This strongly suggests that the feature represents a hitherto unknown passage tomb.”

The lidar survey also revealed a wealth of other new monuments and possible monuments (in excess of 65), including previously unrecorded embanked enclosures at Carranstown, Co. Meath and in Dowth townland.

With three henges/embanked enclosures and the remarkable images of the chamber and passage these discoveries rewrite the narrative of Brú na Bóinne, and demonstrate the huge potential of lidar in both archaeological prospection and landscape archaeology.

(Excerpt) Read more at pasthorizonspr.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: fartyshadesofgreen; godsgravesglyphs; ireland; meath
New central mound with outer enclosure feature and further elongated feature to the east of the site. Image: Stephen Davis, UCD. Lidar data courtesy Meath Co. Council.

New central mound with outer enclosure feature and further elongated feature to the east of the site. Image: Stephen Davis, UCD. Lidar data courtesy Meath Co. Council.
Magnetic gradiometry and resistivity survey, ME019-094 (LP2). Survey undertaken by Kevin Barton, LGS Ltd.

Magnetic gradiometry and resistivity survey, ME019-094 (LP2). Survey undertaken by Kevin Barton, LGS Ltd.

1 posted on 09/15/2013 7:02:53 AM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

2 posted on 09/15/2013 7:03:46 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I’ve saw these sites some 20 years ago. They were SO interesting. I hadn’t know the Irish Celts were so old.


3 posted on 09/15/2013 7:04:38 AM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain
Of all the western cultures only the Greeks and Jews can claim lineages older than the Celts.

CC

4 posted on 09/15/2013 7:16:55 AM PDT by Celtic Conservative (tease not the dragon for thou art crunchy when roasted and taste good with ketchup)
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To: Celtic Conservative

Actually Jews and Celts are related. The Celts were part of the original diaspora.... the ‘lost tribes’.


5 posted on 09/15/2013 7:29:06 AM PDT by Nifster
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To: Nifster
I thought the Celts were most closely related to the prehistoric Kurgan culture? I have also heard of the Kurgans as being "proto-Celtic".

CC

6 posted on 09/15/2013 7:33:14 AM PDT by Celtic Conservative (tease not the dragon for thou art crunchy when roasted and taste good with ketchup)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks again. If you have a ping list, add me!


7 posted on 09/15/2013 8:02:20 AM PDT by Dudoight
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks again. If you have a ping list, add me!


8 posted on 09/15/2013 8:02:46 AM PDT by Dudoight
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To: SunkenCiv

Fascinating stuff!


9 posted on 09/15/2013 8:59:23 AM PDT by Standing Wolf (No tyrant should ever be allowed to die of natural causes.)
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To: cloudmountain

Before they got to Ireland, Scotland, Cornwall, northern France and Wales, the Celts lived all over Europe. They were even in Serbia for a while. Near Belgrade, at the confluence of the Danube and the Sava Rivers, the Roman fortification there was built on Celtic ruins. The Serbs think of the Irish as cousins and they love Irish music.


10 posted on 09/15/2013 8:59:55 AM PDT by SC_Pete
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To: SunkenCiv
Related to the 12th of July?
11 posted on 09/15/2013 11:28:53 AM PDT by Little Bill (A)
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