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Archaeologists excavate Roman soldier’s chain mail
Heritage Media ^ | September 10, 2013

Posted on 09/15/2013 5:03:39 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Archaeologists from Freie Universität Berlin made a spectacular discovery in their excavations of a Roman-Germanic battlefield at the Harzhorn in Lower Saxony.

While exploring the area near Kalefeld in the Northeim district north of Göttingen, the researchers, headed by Prof. Dr. Michael Meyer, found the chain mail of a Roman soldier from the Third Century AD. It was the first time that such a well-preserved piece of body armor was excavated on a Roman-Germanic battlefield. This piece of equipment, worn on the body, made it possible to reconstruct an individual story in the battle, a close-up image of the war, said Michael Meyer, a professor of prehistoric archaeology at Freie Universität Berlin.

The chain mail, which was found in several fragments, consists of thousands of small chain links with a diameter of about six millimeters. The iron in the rings, however, is largely decomposed. Chain mail was worn in battle by Roman soldiers of various ranks. Germanic warriors usually waived this protection; however, in Germanic burial grounds, remains of those laboriously produced armor can often be found. In this case, not only the object itself was an unusual find, but also the position in which it was found. It was located directly on the edge of the battlefield with probably the most intense combat action that could be detected on the Harzhorn hill.

(Excerpt) Read more at heritagedaily.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: chainmail; germany; godsgravesglyphs; lowersaxony; romanempire
Fragments of chain mail from Harzhorn found at Kalefeld near Göttingen. Credit: Detlef Bach, Winterbach. Contributing Source : Freie Universitaet Berlin

Fragments of chain mail from Harzhorn found at Kalefeld near Göttingen. Credit: Detlef Bach, Winterbach.
Contributing Source : Freie Universitaet Berlin

1 posted on 09/15/2013 5:03:39 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

Wow, I never thought anyone could make Charlie Rose look good.

2 posted on 09/15/2013 5:04:38 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Interesting. I've made chain mail. I wish there were better samples so I could see if it was a riveted type of ring.

/johnny

4 posted on 09/15/2013 5:22:12 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: SunkenCiv

Great find!


5 posted on 09/15/2013 5:38:11 PM PDT by Chainmail (A simple rule of life: if you can be blamed, you're responsible.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanks...love the Roman related stories.


6 posted on 09/15/2013 5:48:53 PM PDT by Aetius
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To: SunkenCiv

Not to be confused with chain letters.


7 posted on 09/15/2013 5:50:08 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I disagree with their interpretation of why the armor was left on the field.

Ancient armies were notable scavengers of arms and armor. Something as valuable as a suit of chain mail would be a prize. Since it was found at an edge of the battlefield, I’m guessing the body wearing the armor was simply overlooked for some reason.

Maybe buried under other bodies or in a place where a body was hidden by brush, creekbed, etc.

Over the years an unprotected body would disintegrate, leaving the armor.


8 posted on 09/17/2013 10:30:36 AM PDT by wildbill
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To: SunkenCiv

Wow, this battle was fought pretty doggone deep in Germany. It makes me wonder how frequent Roman incursions were after Teutoburg.


9 posted on 09/19/2013 1:14:51 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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