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Battle of Antietam Sept 17, 1862
history.com ^ | 9/17/13 | This Day in History

Posted on 09/17/2013 9:40:39 AM PDT by central_va

Beginning early on the morning of this day in 1862, Confederate and Union troops in the Civil War clash near Maryland's Antietam Creek in the bloodiest one-day battle in American history.

The Battle of Antietam marked the culmination of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the Northern states. Guiding his Army of Northern Virginia across the Potomac River in early September 1862, the great general daringly divided his men, sending half of them, under the command of General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, to capture the Union garrison at Harper's Ferry.

President Abraham Lincoln put Major General George B. McClellan in charge of the Union troops responsible for defending Washington, D.C., against Lee's invasion. McClellan's Army of the Potomac clashed first with Lee's men on September 14, with the Confederates forced to retreat after being blocked at the passes of South Mountain. Though Lee considered turning back toward Virginia, news of Jackson's capture of Harper's Ferry reached him on September 15. That victory convinced him to stay and make a stand near Sharpsburg, Maryland.

Over the course of September 15 and 16, the Confederate and Union armies gathered on opposite sides of Antietam Creek. On the Confederate side, Jackson commanded the left flank with General James Longstreet at the head of the center and right. McClellan's strategy was to attack the enemy left, then the right, and finally, when either of those movements met with success, to move forward in the center.

When fighting began in the foggy dawn hours of September 17, this strategy broke down into a series of uncoordinated advances by Union soldiers under the command of Generals Joseph Hooker, Joseph Mansfield and Edwin Sumner. As savage and bloody combat continued for eight hours across the region, the Confederates were pushed back but not beaten, despite sustaining some 15,000 casualties. At the same time, Union General Ambrose Burnside opened an attack on the Confederate right, capturing the bridge that now bears his name around 1 p.m. Burnside's break to reorganize his men allowed Confederate reinforcements to arrive, turning back the Union advance there as well.

By the time the sun went down, both armies still held their ground, despite staggering combined casualties--nearly 23,000 of the 100,000 soldiers engaged, including almost 4,000 dead. McClellan's center never moved forward, leaving a large number of Union troops that did not participate in the battle. On the morning of September 18, both sides gathered their wounded and buried their dead. That night, Lee turned his forces back to Virginia. His retreat gave President Lincoln the moment he had been waiting for to issue the Emancipation Proclamation, a historic document that turned the Union effort in the Civil War into a fight for the abolition of slavery.


TOPICS: Education; History; Military/Veterans; Society
KEYWORDS: anniversary; antietam; civilwar; dixie; militaryhistory
This battlefield is not near a major urban center and everyone agrees that it looks pretty much like it did on 1862. A must see.


1 posted on 09/17/2013 9:40:40 AM PDT by central_va
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To: central_va
I use this in all my talks to discredit so-called "social history" and note that this single battle did more to change the world than all the "I Love Lucy" episodes or union activity put together.

1) Br and Fr were put out of the war by the Union victory.

2) Lee was finally (though not decisively) beaten by a Union general and his losses as % of troops committed was significantly higher than McClellan's losses.

3) Lincoln was able to issue the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation.

4) Battlefield photography really reached the public for the first time and put new pressure on the Army to limit casualties.

2 posted on 09/17/2013 9:43:47 AM PDT by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: central_va

The one battlefield that ALWAYS has a profound effect on me .... spirits still wander there and I can feel them - I alway have a very emotional reaction to being there. I’m not into paranormal occurrences, etc. but at Antietam .... it’s different.


3 posted on 09/17/2013 9:45:31 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: central_va

The stat I read was that more Americans died in the first 20 minutes at Antietam than all the Americans at the Normandy beachhead.


4 posted on 09/17/2013 9:46:48 AM PDT by SMARTY ("The test of every religious, political, or educational system is the man that it forms." H. Amiel)
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To: MissMagnolia

you should visit LITTLE BIG HORN for a really spooky experience. also CONSTITUTION DAY and start of MARKET GARDEN in ‘44


5 posted on 09/17/2013 9:48:31 AM PDT by bravo whiskey (We should not fear our government. Our government should fear us.)
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To: MissMagnolia

It is a creepy place, very strange.

6 posted on 09/17/2013 9:49:14 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: central_va

In late October 2001, my husband and I took a trip out East to tour Civil War battlefields. The morning we visited Antietam, the mist was rising off the fields. The park ranger said that conditions were probably similar to the day of battle as it was a very foggy/misty morning that day, too. We were the first visitors out that morning and the eery quiet served to heighten the sense of loss and sadness. It was a sobering visit and felt so important for us to do in the aftermath of 9/11.

I agree, it is a must-see.


7 posted on 09/17/2013 9:51:08 AM PDT by missycocopuffs
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To: central_va

My 5th grade class took a field trip to watch the re-enactment in 1962, still have vivid memories of that day.


8 posted on 09/17/2013 9:52:30 AM PDT by ratzoe (damn, I miss Barbara Olson)
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To: central_va

It’s a beautiful place, too .... the juxtaposition of the beauty now and the horror then is part of the whole experience that ‘gets’ to me when I’m there.


9 posted on 09/17/2013 9:52:57 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: missycocopuffs

I’ve been there three times, and I always have a feeling I am being watched.


10 posted on 09/17/2013 9:53:00 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: MissMagnolia

I’ve felt the same way at Gettysburg. Drove out early one foggy morning while in Harrisburg on business, and for a little while I was the only person on Cemetery Ridge. The effect surprised me.


11 posted on 09/17/2013 9:53:06 AM PDT by skeeter
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To: central_va; Alamo-Girl; Interesting Times; 2ndDivisionVet; zot; kristinn

Thanks for reminding us of the Antietam/Sharpsburg battle on this day in 1862


12 posted on 09/17/2013 10:13:49 AM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: skeeter

A now-passed friend and I walked from the woods to Cemetery Ridge one chilly afternoon, with nearly no one there.

To think that thousands of men did the same walk, while under fire almost the whole way, boggles the mind. Not sure I would have the courage for that.


13 posted on 09/17/2013 10:14:19 AM PDT by tcrlaf (Well, it is what the Sheeple voted for....)
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To: MissMagnolia

I had a similar experience at Manassas/Bull Run. Heard horses, cannons, and screaming. Smelt horses and gunpowder.


14 posted on 09/17/2013 10:25:03 AM PDT by BubbaBasher ("Liberty will not long survive the total extinction of morals" - Sam Adams)
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To: bravo whiskey
Operation Market-Garden Sept. 17, 1944. General Bernard Montgomery's attempt to win the Second World War by himself. Arrogant little Brit pipsqueak. I've known quite a few American WW2 vets who told me flat out "I'd of shot that Limey bastard quicker than I'd shot Hitler''.
15 posted on 09/17/2013 10:26:23 AM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: tcrlaf

“Only the dead have seen the end of war’’. Plato.


16 posted on 09/17/2013 10:27:55 AM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: BubbaBasher
I had a similar experience at Manassas/Bull Run. Heard horses, cannons, and screaming. Smelt horses and gunpowder.


17 posted on 09/17/2013 10:28:15 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: skeeter; central_va
A friend and I went to Sailor's Creek Christmas before last. Sailor's Creek was the last big battle before Lee surrendered at Appomattox 72 hours later. The park folks had decorated the house and Christmas tree in the way they did back in the Civil War era. The park LEO was hanging around and offered to give us a talk since the interpretive person was talking to another group in the house. It was one of the best 'talks' I've ever gotten - he was obviously personally interested and knew his stuff and since we had him to ourselves, we had time for lots of questions and discussions.

The reality of the war was really brought home by what we learned there. Confederate soldiers that were paroled at Appomattox came back through the area on their way home ... only to see the Confederate dead still all over the fields (the Union army buried their dead, left the Confederates). The farm manager and his hands were trying to bury the dead in mass graves. The house had been used as a surgery by the Union - the state police forensic folks tested what looked like blood stains on the underside of the boards (blood ran through the cracks) and confirmed it was very old blood. Amputated body parts were stacked outside the door and thrown into the well, which obviously rendered it useless. The wife and kids living there were in the basement during the battle - she could not bear to stay there after the battle (moved in with the farm manager's family). Her husband was one of the prisoners used as a human shield by the Union at Charleston in an attempt to silence the Confederate gunners at Fort Sumter ... one of The Immortal Six Hundred. I believe he later returned to his family.

Something else interesting ... those troops captured at Sailor's Creek were not paroled .... the soldiers who made it to Appomattox were a lot more fortunate and allowed to go home after the surrender. Surprisingly (to me), the Sailor's Creek battle prisoners were shipped way north (midwest) and put in prison camps there ... were not released until well after the war ended at Appomattox.

When on the grounds of the battlefields, depending on the day, the conditions (fog, mist, etc.), it's surprising some of the experiences that occur. Being at Sailor's Creek with the house decorated for Christmas (and a Santa Claus there, dressed in a period suit, too) and then hearing what happened in the house and around it was something I won't forget (but for me, no 'spirits' like Antietam). Here's an interesting link on Sailor's Creek. My 3rd great grandparents owned a farm and were in the house at the time a well-known battle took place in VA so there is lots of CW history in the family. I always resent it when people comment on the Civil War still going on for Southerners, but no, we Southerners don't forget our (family) history.

18 posted on 09/17/2013 10:39:45 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: central_va

Thanks for the post!


19 posted on 09/17/2013 10:41:07 AM PDT by WKUHilltopper (And yet...we continue to tolerate this crap...)
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To: BubbaBasher

That is quite something. I’ve been by Manassas/Bull Run several times, but haven’t ever had time to stop. I need to add that to my battlefields-to-visit list.


20 posted on 09/17/2013 10:43:39 AM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: jmacusa

On this day in 1944, General Browning of the First Allied Airborne Army, upon landing in the 82nd Airborne DZ, ran across the field to the Reichwald Forest, just inside the German Border, because he wanted to be the first British officer to pee in Germany.


21 posted on 09/17/2013 10:52:29 AM PDT by yawningotter
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To: MissMagnolia

Awesome post!


22 posted on 09/17/2013 10:53:50 AM PDT by ohioman
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To: GreyFriar

Thanks for the ping.


23 posted on 09/17/2013 10:54:58 AM PDT by zot
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To: yawningotter

Churchill later did the same thing in March of 1945. Seriously though, Market-Garden was a bloody disaster.


24 posted on 09/17/2013 10:57:55 AM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: central_va

I wouldn’t be so quick to judge. I was at Manassas several years ago, talking to a couple Rangers at the visitor center, and a family comes in all excited and wanting to know where the reenactment is. Rangers tell them there’s no reenactment that day, but the father (with wife and two sons nodding in agreement) is adamant that they heard massed musket and cannon fire coming from the direction of Chin Ridge. The Rangers tell him again, no reenactment, and one of them leaves to go investgate the reported gunfire. The other one looks at me and says “we get these every week or two”.

Apparantly the big occurances are the people either thrilled or absolutely apalled at the realism of the Civil War medicine living history demos at the Stone House that happen regularly, but again without any such thing being on the schedule ...


25 posted on 09/17/2013 11:03:49 AM PDT by tanknetter
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To: MissMagnolia

Very interesting post. I live in Lynchburg and have been to Appomattox but never Sailor’s Creek.


26 posted on 09/17/2013 11:09:09 AM PDT by Wage Slave
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To: GreyFriar

Thanks for the ping!


27 posted on 09/17/2013 11:35:10 AM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: MissMagnolia

Our family lost a descendant in the fighting at antietam (49th Penn volunteers, I think) so I understand what you mean.


28 posted on 09/17/2013 12:14:51 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: skeeter; central_va; All

Just found this link ... looks good:

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/antietam/maps/antietam-animated-map.html


29 posted on 09/17/2013 12:39:03 PM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: LS; SMARTY; bravo whiskey; missycocopuffs; ratzoe; GreyFriar; tcrlaf; BubbaBasher; jmacusa; ...

Excellent video showing the Battle of Antietam:

http://www.civilwar.org/battlefields/antietam/maps/antietam-animated-map.html


30 posted on 09/17/2013 12:59:36 PM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: skeeter
My great-great grandfather(mom's side) work in the Surgeon Generals Office in DC from 1861 to 1865. I believe my oldest brother has his diary, some record books, papers and other property that was his. I remember him reading me a notation sometime written in mid-October of 1862 where my ancestor made mention about still treating ‘’the Antietam wounded’’, and he wrote of ‘’grievous wounds.. ‘’ many amputations.’’
31 posted on 09/17/2013 1:18:57 PM PDT by jmacusa (Political correctness is cultural Marxism. I'm not a Marxist.)
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To: central_va

Great stuff, and thanks for posting! This place is on the bucket list.


32 posted on 09/17/2013 1:39:01 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: central_va

TYVM for this. I learned recently that my ancestor was one of the six generals killed that day. In reading further about him, quite an accomplished man he was. Also, that Antietam was the bloodiest day in US Military History.


33 posted on 09/17/2013 1:51:21 PM PDT by A_Former_Democrat (LEAVE THE ZIMMERMANS ALONE . . . NOT guilty . . .you LOST Now SHUT UP)
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To: MissMagnolia

I can only get the intro to play.


34 posted on 09/17/2013 2:21:34 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: MissMagnolia

That was so interesting. Thanks!


35 posted on 09/17/2013 2:54:18 PM PDT by manic4organic (It was nice knowing you, America.)
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To: skeeter

Noooooo ........

So sorry if you can’t get it .... have you tried clicking on the individual segments at the bottom of the video (where sound control etc. is)? Maybe you have to manually go to the next section. When I played it, after the intro it stopped ....and I thought is that all? Then it finally continued to play after a few seconds. I just went to it and while the intro was playing, clicked the next segment and it played.


36 posted on 09/17/2013 3:14:15 PM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: MissMagnolia
It works. A good concise presentation, thanks.

My kin, John Kirkpatrick, a private and carpenter from western Pennsylvania, was the only KIA from his unit during the battle. He died some three days after the action.

37 posted on 09/17/2013 3:42:04 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: skeeter

Yay! Glad it worked for you. :-)


38 posted on 09/17/2013 4:00:50 PM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: MissMagnolia
Her husband was one of the prisoners used as a human shield by the Union at Charleston in an attempt to silence the Confederate gunners at Fort Sumter ... one of The Immortal Six Hundred.To be fair, this action was taken in retaliation for CSA using Union officers as human shields.

The subsequent treatment of the 600 is a good deal less justifiable.

39 posted on 09/17/2013 6:02:57 PM PDT by Sherman Logan (Mark Steyn: "In the Middle East, the enemy of our enemy is also our enemy.")
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To: Sherman Logan
To be fair, this action was taken in retaliation for CSA using Union officers as human shields.

True!

40 posted on 09/17/2013 6:26:23 PM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: onedoug

ping


41 posted on 09/17/2013 6:58:47 PM PDT by stylecouncilor
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To: central_va

I visited there this past spring. Beautiful place.


42 posted on 09/17/2013 7:01:17 PM PDT by HokieMom (Pacepa : Can the U.S. afford a president who can't recognize anti-Americanism?)
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To: central_va; MissMagnolia

Up for Song of the Year, from my friend Claire Lynch (written by her and Louisa Branscomb):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yqp_rn9rdTw

It is the soldier who craves Peace, and the libs who rail against our military are the ones who constantly get us into conflicts. Blessings for the Fallen this 150 Anniversary Year of the WBTS.

Deo Vindice.


43 posted on 09/17/2013 7:59:19 PM PDT by John S Mosby (Sic Semper Tyrannis)
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To: John S Mosby

Oh wow .... thank you for sharing that link ... beautiful song and sentiment.


44 posted on 09/17/2013 8:07:20 PM PDT by MissMagnolia (You see, truth always resides wherever brave men still have ammunition. I pick truth. (John Ransom))
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To: MissMagnolia

Thank you for the link.


45 posted on 09/18/2013 7:38:14 AM PDT by GreyFriar (Spearhead - 3rd Armored Division 75-78 & 83-87)
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To: central_va

Is that Burnside’s Bridge?


46 posted on 09/18/2013 9:00:21 AM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
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To: ops33

yes burnsides bridge.


47 posted on 09/18/2013 9:06:43 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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