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Giant Prehistoric Elephant Slaughtered by Early Humans
Science News ^ | September 19, 2013 | University of Southampton, via AlphaGalileo

Posted on 09/27/2013 6:10:14 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Dr Francis Wenban-Smith discovered a site containing remains of an extinct straight-tusked elephant (Palaeoloxodon antiquus) in 2003, in an area of land at Ebbsfleet in Kent, during the construction of the High Speed 1 rail link from the Channel Tunnel to London...

Excavation revealed a deep sequence of deposits containing the elephant remains, along with numerous flint tools and a range of other species such as; wild aurochs, extinct forms of rhinoceros and lion, Barbary macaque, beaver, rabbit, various forms of vole and shrew, and a diverse assemblage of snails. These remains confirm that the deposits date to a warm period of climate around 420,000 years ago, the so-called Hoxnian interglacial, when the climate was probably slightly warmer than the present day.

Since the excavation, which took place in 2004, Francis has been carrying out a detailed analysis of evidence recovered from the site, including 80 undisturbed flint artefacts found scattered around the elephant carcass and used to butcher it. The pre-historic elephant was twice the size of today's African variety and up to four times the weight of family car...

An ability to hunt large mammals, and in particular elephants, as suggested by the Ebbsfleet find, would go some way to explaining how these people then managed to push northwards again into what is now Britain. The flint artefacts of these pioneer settlers are of a characteristic type known as Clactonian, mostly comprising simple razor-sharp flakes that would have been ideal for cutting meat, sometimes with notches on them that would have helped cut through the tougher animal hide.

(Excerpt) Read more at sciencedaily.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: dietandcuisine; godsgravesglyphs; neandertal; neandertals; neanderthal; neanderthals
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Elephant tusks at Ebbsfleet. (Credit: University of Southampton)

Elephant tusks at Ebbsfleet. (Credit: University of Southampton)

1 posted on 09/27/2013 6:10:14 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

2 posted on 09/27/2013 6:11:11 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
I've got recipes....

/johnny

3 posted on 09/27/2013 6:11:25 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: SunkenCiv

“’These remains confirm that the deposits date to a warm period of climate around 420,000 years ago, the so-called Hoxnian interglacial, when the climate was probably slightly warmer than the present day. “

Those darn SUVs


4 posted on 09/27/2013 6:14:36 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Was there a CMETA to protest the slaughter?


5 posted on 09/27/2013 6:16:05 PM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: Puppage
Don't know what a CMETA is, but I may have recipes for those, too.

/johnny

6 posted on 09/27/2013 6:18:38 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Ummm... “Cro-Magnons for the Efficient Taxidermy of Aurochs”?


7 posted on 09/27/2013 6:22:07 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer
Under Cro-Magnon, I have that as a substitute for long pig.

/johnny

8 posted on 09/27/2013 6:23:30 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I thought that’s what LEOs were?


9 posted on 09/27/2013 6:27:15 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: Utilizer
'Substitutes for long pig' is a very long entry.

/johnny

10 posted on 09/27/2013 6:28:58 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: driftdiver
"Those darn SUVs"

SUPs - Sport Utility Pachyderms.


11 posted on 09/27/2013 6:29:41 PM PDT by PLMerite (Shut the Beyotch Down! Burn, baby, burn!)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I thought there might be a good soup somewhere that used Elephant, and although I haven’t tried it, it sounds interesting.. :)

Elephant Soup

In African villages, a successful hunt means a share of fresh meat for everyone. After traveling in equatorial Africa one observer wrote, “...the gorge they all go in for after a successful elephant hunt is a thing to see — once”. (Mary Kingsley, Travels in West Africa, 1897.) There can still be more meat than can be immediately consumed, especially when there are no refrigerators or freezers, so a tradition of preserving meat by drying or smoking has developed throughout Africa. Dried meat, called biltong (similar to jerky) is often eaten as is. This recipe shows how dried meat can be used to make a soup or stew, similar to what is described in the quotation from Baker, below. (See also: Elephant.)
african elephants were trained as beasts of burden in the belgian congo

What you need

one-half pound of biltong, or dried or smoked meat like beef jerky (the original recipe mentions elephant meat coated with salt and honey and dried in the sun)
six to eight cups of beef broth or beef stock
one cup of mirepoix [diced carrots, onions, celery and herbs sautéed in butter] (optional)
two onions, finely chopped
one cup shelled, roasted peanuts (or one-half cup peanut butter)
one cup boiled chana dal (or any lentils or dried peas)
one small leek, finely chopped
one cup of Wumubu mushrooms (or any kind of mushrooms), (the original recipe says that Wumubu are “a type of black African mushroom”)
two tablespoons of butter
salt, black pepper (to taste)
one-half cup cream

What you do

Wash the biltong or dried meat in hot water, and cut it into bite-sized pieces.
In a large pot or dutch oven, combine the meat with enough cold water to cover it, and cook over a low heat for twenty to thirty minutes.
Add the mirepoix and beef broth and simmer for two hours.
Add the onions, peanuts, and dal (lentils), mushrooms, and leek. Cook until the dal are completely disintegrated.
Adjust the seasoning. Add the butter and cream. Serve.

Recipe adapted from Exotische Gerichte: Rezepte aus der Orientalischen, Afrikanischen und Asiatischen Kueche by Werner Fisher, (Hugo Matthaes Verlag, Stuttgart, 1961). The original recipe also calls some good Madeira to be added along with the cream.

If possible, obtain real African biltong (from an international or African import grocery store). There are many websites with recipes telling how to make your own biltong. South Africans in particular are sensitive about comparing African biltong to American beef jerky.


12 posted on 09/27/2013 6:30:19 PM PDT by carlo3b (Speechless in Sugar Land)
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To: JRandomFreeper; SunkenCiv
a substitute for long pig

this reply is prolly a recipe for disaster but wth

there is no substitute for a really good piece of a..

13 posted on 09/27/2013 6:33:43 PM PDT by bigheadfred (INFIDEL)
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To: carlo3b
South Africans in particular are sensitive about comparing African biltong to American beef jerky.

Yeh, well, I am rather sensitive about calling shrimp and lobster "insects", but the truth can be quite difficult to swallow at times.

14 posted on 09/27/2013 6:35:43 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: SunkenCiv

Prehistoric capitalists.


15 posted on 09/27/2013 6:36:32 PM PDT by MN.Gruber06
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To: SunkenCiv

And here's a modern elephant that's just as doomed.

16 posted on 09/27/2013 6:39:30 PM PDT by workerbee (The President of the United States is DOMESTIC ENEMY #1)
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To: Utilizer

Real Italians, like my grandparents, ate some pretty unusual stuff, and I had to try it, or else, I have to confess I’m not a courageous gourmet.. LOL


17 posted on 09/27/2013 6:41:15 PM PDT by carlo3b (Speechless in Sugar Land)
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To: SunkenCiv
I don't know that anyone has noticed this yet but:

"...deposits containing the elephant remains, along with numerous flint tools and a range of other species such as; wild aurochs, extinct forms of rhinoceros and lion, Barbary macaque, beaver, rabbit, various forms of vole and shrew, and a diverse..."

As far as I know rhinoceros, lion and elephant are traditionally found south of the equator in a land called Africa, a very long way south of Kent, England. Considering we are talking about 420,000BCE, we cannot use Rome as an excuse, or any other "modern" civilization.

Elephant I can handle, but how did rhinoceros and lion bones find their way so very far north?

18 posted on 09/27/2013 6:44:14 PM PDT by egfowler3 (Why do I even bother? No one's listening.)
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To: bigheadfred
I list horse and democrats under that entry.

Of course, {redacted}.

/johnny

19 posted on 09/27/2013 6:48:09 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: egfowler3
but how did rhinoceros and lion bones find their way so very far north?

They walked. It was warmer then.

/johnny

20 posted on 09/27/2013 6:49:21 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I can understand listing horse under a.. but it seems like there is something really fowl about democrats.


21 posted on 09/27/2013 6:51:57 PM PDT by bigheadfred (INFIDEL)
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To: SunkenCiv

Those evil humans.


22 posted on 09/27/2013 6:52:43 PM PDT by Lancey Howard
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To: carlo3b

I hear you, mate. However, ever since I read that argument about how lobsters and shrimp are really just gigantic insects (carapice, six legs, invertebrate, antennas, non-irised eyes) I have not been able to even consider eating lobster again, although I used to love it.


23 posted on 09/27/2013 6:53:13 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: egfowler3
Elephant I can handle, but how did rhinoceros and lion bones find their way so very far north?

I dunno about rhinos, but lions only became extinct in England fairly recently from what I am given to understand. Bears as well, I believe.

24 posted on 09/27/2013 6:55:08 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: SunkenCiv

What species of hominin was in Englad 450,000 years ago? Weird, I have only thought modern humans have been found there.


25 posted on 09/27/2013 6:56:04 PM PDT by Sawdring
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To: Sawdring

Ummm... ‘ad-hominins’?


26 posted on 09/27/2013 7:27:35 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: driftdiver

Probably Wooly Mammoth Toots.


27 posted on 09/27/2013 7:44:27 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Utilizer

I mean, of course; that’s why they are called “ad-hominin” attacks!


28 posted on 09/27/2013 7:47:06 PM PDT by Utilizer (Bacon A'kbar! - In world today are only peaceful people, and the mooslimbs trying to kill them-)
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To: JRandomFreeper

CaveMenforEthicalTreatmentofAnimals


29 posted on 09/27/2013 7:56:37 PM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: PLMerite

keyboard spew alert


30 posted on 09/27/2013 8:21:21 PM PDT by SteveH (First they ignore you. Then they laugh at you. Then they fight you. Then you win.)
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To: egfowler3

“Elephant I can handle, but how did rhinoceros and lion bones find their way so very far north?”

One step after another.


31 posted on 09/27/2013 8:51:31 PM PDT by GladesGuru (uences)
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To: SunkenCiv


32 posted on 09/27/2013 10:21:49 PM PDT by garjog (Obama: making the world safe for Sharia.)
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To: Utilizer

Ahhhhh but was it union labor.


33 posted on 09/27/2013 10:37:35 PM PDT by Conservative4Ever (I'm going Galt)
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To: egfowler3

They were purchased at Trader Joe’s?


34 posted on 09/27/2013 10:42:51 PM PDT by Conservative4Ever (I'm going Galt)
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To: egfowler3
Elephant I can handle, but how did rhinoceros and lion bones find their way so very far north?

The same way the elephants did. They walked in with the rest of the critter before sea levels rose and inundated the Channel.

35 posted on 09/27/2013 10:51:06 PM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Sawdring

Homo Heidelbergensis, or Homo Erectus, from among the known ones were around at that time.


36 posted on 09/28/2013 2:55:05 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: bigheadfred

Is that an elephant trunk, or were they just happy to see her?


37 posted on 09/28/2013 3:03:23 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: egfowler3; Fred Nerks

The climate has changed. Weird, eh? Velikovsky discusses this in “Earth in Upheaval”.


38 posted on 09/28/2013 3:04:10 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
EARTH IN UPHEAVAL. SCRIBD LINK HERE

The Caves of England -Page 15,

In 1823, William Buckland, professor of geology at the University of Oxford, Published his Reliquiae diluvianae (Relics of the flood), with the subtitle, Observations on the organic remains contained in caves, fissures, and diluvial gravel, and other geological phenomena, attesting the action of an universal deluge.

Buckland was one of the great authorities on geology in the first half of the nineteenth century. In a cave in Kirkdale in Yorkshire, eighty feet above the valley, under a floor covering of stalagmites, he found teeth and bones of elephants, rhinoceroses, hippopotami, horses, deer, tigers (teeth of which were larger than those of the largest lion or Bengal tiger), bears, wolves, hyenas, foxes, hares, rabbits, as well as bones of ravens, pigeons, larks, snipe and ducks.

Many of the animals had died 'before the first set, or milk teeth, had been shed.'

The idea which long prevailed, 'was, that they were the remains of elephants imported by the Roman armies. This is also refuted First by the anatomical fact of their belonging to extinct species of this genus, second, by their being usually accompanied by the bones of rhinoceros and hippopotamus, animals that could never have been attached to Roman armies: thirdly, by their being found dispersed over Siberia and North America, in equal or even greater abundance than in those parts of Europe which were subjected to the Roman power.'

39 posted on 09/28/2013 3:30:22 AM PDT by Fred Nerks (fair dinkum!)
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To: SunkenCiv

...In the desert of the United Arab Emirates, there is an unusual series of flat discs imprinted in the sand. Each one is about 40 centimetres wide, and they snake off into the distance in several parallel lines, for hundreds of metres.

They are tracks. They were made by a herd of at least 14 early elephants, marching across the land between 6 and 8 million years ago. The track-makers are long dead, but in the intervening time, nothing has buried their tracks or eroded them away. Today, their social lives are still recorded in their fossilised footsteps.

March of the Ancient Elephants

(I question the dating, but obviously they lived in that region of what is now the UAE at a time when water and forage was abundant.)

40 posted on 09/28/2013 3:47:45 AM PDT by Fred Nerks (fair dinkum!)
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To: Utilizer

LOL, spell checker got away from me on that one.


41 posted on 09/28/2013 11:14:39 AM PDT by Sawdring
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To: SunkenCiv

I didn’t know they had found them in England before.


42 posted on 09/28/2013 11:16:06 AM PDT by Sawdring
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To: SunkenCiv; Revolting cat!

I knew they had to be white europeans without even clicking on the article.

the noble savage wouldn’t do such things!


43 posted on 09/29/2013 9:38:56 AM PDT by a fool in paradise (America 2013 - STUCK ON STUPID)
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To: SunkenCiv
I read somewhere that there have been seven occasions when humans or ancestors colonized Britain. Six times beaten back. On the seventh attempt now.

They'd better hope there's something to this globull warming.

44 posted on 10/02/2013 1:32:49 PM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: colorado tanker

Britain has been invaded as much if not more than any place worth living in on the face of the E, but the level of denial about that, usually referencing the natural alleged barrier of the surrounding seas, has been very great. The last successful invasion (not counting the Muzzie one, that hasn’t come to full fruit yet) was William and Mary’s “Glorious Revolution” which led to the overthrow of her brother James II, but the Irish “Book of Invasions” details various periods of recolonization after periods of wasteland, probably not entirely historical in character, and/or drawing on a prehistoric oral tradition dressed up with new names for the cast of characters and the groups to which they belonged.

(IMHO)

http://www.donaldcorrell.com/tales/invasions.html


45 posted on 10/02/2013 6:09:10 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Fred Nerks

That’s the one! :’) Thanks FN!


46 posted on 10/02/2013 6:11:31 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Fred Nerks

That’s pretty great as well.

Gosh, I wonder how these tracks managed to not blow away in, or get covered by, the winds, before they were fossilized. ;’)


47 posted on 10/02/2013 6:12:30 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Lots of people overlook that aspect of the Glorious Revolution. Sure, Parliament offered William the crown, but it was his Dutch army that secured it.


48 posted on 10/03/2013 11:15:46 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: SunkenCiv

Oh, and then William went and invaded Ireland. :-))


49 posted on 10/03/2013 11:16:23 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: Sawdring
When I was a kid they made a documentary on early humans.


50 posted on 10/03/2013 11:22:36 AM PDT by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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