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Ancient city of Iasos rises out of the ashes
Hürriyet Daily News ^ | Tuesday, September 13 2011 | Dogan News Agency

Posted on 09/30/2013 6:11:28 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Archaeologists working on Iasos on Turkey’s Aegean coast have recently discovered that the ancient city was buried under a mountain of ash caused by the explosion of Mt. Thera on Santorini 3,600 years ago.

Excavation works have also revealed a sewage system that was in place in the 4,000-year-old city and tunnels to the city’s theater...

Spanu said columns that were found one meter underground provided vital information about the history of the city. “Following the explosion of the volcano Thera, which also caused the destruction of the Minoan civilization on the islands of Crete and Santorini, the ancient city was covered with ash and remained so for a while...

(Excerpt) Read more at hurriyetdailynews.com ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: akrotiri; anatolia; ancient; ancientturkey; ashes; calliste; catastrophism; city; godsgravesglyphs; iasos; rises; santorini; thera; turkey

If this is an actual photo of the ruins, it's obvious that this city is classical Greek, not Mycenaean Greek.
This year excavations in Iasos have revealed a sewage system that was in place in the 4,000-year-old city and tunnels to the city’s theater. DHA photo

Ancient city of Iasos rises out of the ashes

1 posted on 09/30/2013 6:11:28 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; ...

Also one of *those* topics.


2 posted on 09/30/2013 6:12:55 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

3 posted on 09/30/2013 6:13:12 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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Fossil Insects Tweak Date of Deadly “Atlantis” Eruption
National Geographic | August 22, 2013 | Ker Than
Posted on 08/25/2013 2:52:17 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/3058727/posts


4 posted on 09/30/2013 6:17:04 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Nice Post. Thnx.

Good that the Islamists didn't get there first, pikers that they are.

5 posted on 09/30/2013 6:21:19 PM PDT by Paladin2
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http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/2838596/posts?page=17#17

http://www.varchive.org/ce/baalbek/batruna.htm

http://www.varchive.org/tac/seqdyn.htm

http://www.varchive.org/dag/enkomi.htm

http://www.varchive.org/tac/revegis.htm

http://www.varchive.org/ce/assuruballit.htm

http://www.varchive.org/ce/baalbek/bethshul.htm

http://www.varchive.org/ce/theses.htm

http://www.varchive.org/ce/hammurabi.html


6 posted on 09/30/2013 6:26:23 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Paladin2

The parts of this much longer article that I edited out concentrated on how this site should be a great tourist attraction, if only the gubmint of Turkey would spend some money promoting it. So, in a sense, the Islamists have gotten there. :’)


7 posted on 09/30/2013 6:27:52 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

was that a theater, a religious venue? or a local government council place?

all of these?


8 posted on 09/30/2013 6:28:09 PM PDT by GeronL
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To: GeronL
was that a theater, a religious venue? or a local government council place?

city’s theater

More importantly they had a sewer system!

9 posted on 09/30/2013 6:39:55 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: SunkenCiv

Thanx


10 posted on 09/30/2013 6:40:53 PM PDT by morphing libertarian
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To: GeronL; bigheadfred

Yup, and the Mycenaeans didn’t build like this. No way are the ruins in the picture 3500-4000 years old.


11 posted on 09/30/2013 6:41:18 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: morphing libertarian

My pleasure.


12 posted on 09/30/2013 6:41:34 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

That is not Classical Greek architecture at all.


13 posted on 09/30/2013 6:43:51 PM PDT by WhiskeyX ( provides a system for registering complaints about unfair broadcasters and the ability to request a)
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To: GeronL

It was a medical facility, much like a teaching hospital.

The Aztecs set out in Trieremes to learn the best techniques for removing brains with a crochet hooked instrument and how best to saw quickly through the breast bone to remove the heart.

Sadly, they disregarded the classes about anastesia.

As a consequence, upon their return to Mexico, most patients died from these procedures.....


14 posted on 09/30/2013 6:45:46 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: WhiskeyX

Yes, of course it is. The amphitheater is diagnostic of classic Greek architecture, and to some extent the Roman-era borrowing of it.


15 posted on 09/30/2013 6:52:14 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Archaeologists working on Iasos on Turkey’s Aegean coast have recently discovered

Only recently. Hmmm....The excavations in Iasos started by an Italian team in the head of Prof. Dr. Doro Levi in 1960, and continued by Dr. Fede Berti until today.

It is merely a very poorly written article. The tunnels and sewer may have been in place much earlier and covered with ash. But the newer ruins weren't.

16 posted on 09/30/2013 6:54:33 PM PDT by bigheadfred
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To: bigheadfred

I’m perfectly happy if the ash is A) actually volcanic in origin, instead of being the result of destruction of the town by invaders, and B) from Thera, but I’d venture to guess that this hasn’t actually been scrutinized by appropriate specialists. A classical Greek city (founded in the 6th or 5th c BC) buried by Theran ash in 200 BC would be about right. Probably not reality though.


17 posted on 09/30/2013 7:03:28 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Theater:

http://www.travbuddy.com/photos/blogs/2691073

http://www.travbuddy.com/photos/blogs/2691075

Note the use of the arch, this is classical, not Mycenaean:

http://www.travbuddy.com/photos/blogs/2691071

http://www.travbuddy.com/photos/blogs/2691074


18 posted on 09/30/2013 7:06:52 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Vendome

yikes


19 posted on 09/30/2013 7:21:21 PM PDT by GeronL
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To: SunkenCiv
I searched on Iasos and I believe I found the same photo from a different angle.

What this tells me is a composite structure built and rebuilt by many civilizations. The earliest I see is the Mycenaean Lintel - and behind that, a Roman Barrel vault. (Greeks had many things, but they did not have the arch, the dome or barrel vault.)

20 posted on 09/30/2013 7:32:06 PM PDT by MrsEmmaPeel (a government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take everything you have)
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To: MrsEmmaPeel

Not Mycenaean, more classical architecture.

http://www.travbuddy.com/photos/blogs/2691074


21 posted on 09/30/2013 7:58:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Now in the image you just posted, the lintel there looks more Cycladic to me. The arch behind is definitely Roman.


22 posted on 09/30/2013 8:34:27 PM PDT by MrsEmmaPeel (a government big enough to give you everything you want, is big enough to take everything you have)
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To: SunkenCiv
According to the Blue Guide: Turkey. The Aegean and Mediterranean Coasts (1989), Iasos has excellent harbors, rich fishing grounds, and marble quarries producing a fine red-tinted marble. They have found Minoan (2000-1550 B.C.) and Mycenaean pottery there. Supposedly it was colonized by Argos. The first Greek settlers are thought to have arrived in the 9th century. In the 5th century it was an Athenian ally.

Thucydides reports (8.28) its capture by Spartan and allied forces in 412 B.C.--they handed the city over to the Persian satrap Tissaphernes.

According to Diodorus Siculus, in 405 Lysander took Iasos by storm (it was again an Athenian ally), and killed all the adult males, 800 in all, then enslaved the women and children and leveled the city.

In the fourth century it was subject to Mausolus and later favored by Alexander the Great. It came under the control of Rhodes about 190 B.C. During Mithridates the Great's war against Rome, beginning in 88 B.C., Iasos sided with Mithridates. It prospered during the Roman imperial period.

There has been an Italian archaeological team working there since 1960. It is in SW Turkey, in what was ancient Caria, south of Miletus.

23 posted on 09/30/2013 10:06:23 PM PDT by Verginius Rufus
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To: SunkenCiv

Natural amphitheaters were in existence in the natural rock formations before Humans existed, and the stone age human cultures found such natural amphitheaters to be natural meeting places worthy of artificial emulations. So, what makes you think this particular amphitheater can only be an origin in What Dlassical Greek Timeline; i.e. when?


24 posted on 09/30/2013 10:17:36 PM PDT by WhiskeyX ( provides a system for registering complaints about unfair broadcasters and the ability to request a)
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