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Life-size statue of king Ramses II found in Sharkiya
Ahram Online ^ | Thursday, October 3, 2013 | Nevine El-Aref

Posted on 10/05/2013 7:03:56 PM PDT by SunkenCiv

Reports of missing objects from Cairo's Museum of Islamic Art A German-Egyptian excavation mission in the Nile Delta town of Tel-Basta unearthed today a life-size statue of the nineteenth dynasty king Ramses II carved in red granite.

The statue, at 195cm high and 160cm wide, was found accidently during a routine excavation carried out by the joint mission. It was discovered in the so-called Great Temple area's eastern side, inside the temple of cat goddess Bastet in Sharkiya's Tel-Basta.

Antiquities minister Mohamed Ibrahim explained that the newly-discovered statue depicts king Ramses II standing between the goddess Hathor and the god Petah. On its back, Ibrahim continued, a hieroglyphic text and the cartouche of the king are engraved.

Mohamed Abdel Maqsoud, head of the Ministry of State of Antiquities' (MSA) Ancient Egyptian department, added that the mission uncovered another statue carved in sand stone which depicts a yet-unidentified New Kingdom top official. A hieroglyphic text offering the statue to the goddesses bastet and sekhmet and the god horakhti is engraved on its back. This statue is 35cm in height and 25cm in width, according to Abdel Maqsoud.

"This is a very important discovery that sheds light on the history of Tel-Basta in general and on this area in particular," Abdel Maqsoud told Ahram Online. He added that the discovery, in addition to previous finds in the area, suggests that Tel-Basta was once home to a New Kingdom temple dedicated to King Ramses II, which might be uncovered in the future.

(Excerpt) Read more at english.ahram.org.eg ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: 19thdynasty; 26thdynasty; bastet; catastrophism; egypt; godsgravesglyphs; hathor; petah; ptah; ramsesii; telbasta

subtitle: "Newly unearthed statue of king Ramsess II in Tel-Basta suggests that Nile Delta town was home to great nineteenth dynasty temple".
Life-size statue of king Ramses II found in Sharkiya

1 posted on 10/05/2013 7:03:56 PM PDT by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

2 posted on 10/05/2013 7:04:41 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; ...

This one *may* turn out to be one of *those* topics, and really, anything Ramses II would be anyway.
Mohamed Abdel Maqsoud, head of the Ministry of State of Antiquities' (MSA) Ancient Egyptian department, added that the mission uncovered another statue carved in sand stone which depicts a yet-unidentified New Kingdom top official. A hieroglyphic text offering the statue to the goddesses bastet and sekhmet and the god horakhti is engraved on its back.



3 posted on 10/05/2013 7:09:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
I am always amazed that this ancient culture lived, thrived and died out AGES before any of us. What an anomaly they were.

I'm sure there were other cultures that came and went but the Egyptians were something else. I've been there twice and am still amazed by their long-dead culture.

They had it all.

4 posted on 10/05/2013 7:10:10 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: cloudmountain
They had it all.

What was their average lifespan?
5 posted on 10/05/2013 7:19:00 PM PDT by posterchild
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To: SunkenCiv

Then a muzzie immediately takes a sledgehammer to it...


6 posted on 10/05/2013 7:22:44 PM PDT by Thorliveshere (I wish I lived in Texas.)
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To: cloudmountain

The modern Egyptian line is that pharaonic Egypt was a cohesive whole, and never knew conquest, but that’s been known to be not true since cuneiform writing was cracked. There’s evidence from the Akkadian records (they were the early dynasty of the Assyrian Empire) that Egypt paid them tribute.

Besides the Intermediate Periods after the Old Kingdom and Middle Kingdom (and per the conventional timelines, the 3rd IP after the New Kingdom and the Ptolemaic or Late Kingdom) there were dynastic collapses, and separate independent states with competing pharaohs in different parts of the river basin. That was probably inevitable since the culture(s) was distributed the length of the Nile but only a few miles wide for most of that length.

That said, they developed three different systems of writing (depending on the era and the change of ethnic and cultural composition) and adopted the use of cuneiform for international diplomacy, having developed hieroglyphic writing no later than the 2nd dynasty, and examples of precursors of the characters go back to 3300 BC, it sez here. They continued to develop hieroglyphics until they’d invented thousands of characters, a good many of which remain unreadable, as they exist in single or just a handful of examples from a brief range of years.


7 posted on 10/05/2013 7:25:06 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Yep.


8 posted on 10/05/2013 7:27:17 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: posterchild

Among the reasons for Egyptian mortality is dental problems, such as absesses, brought on by the residue of tiny bits of stone baked right into the bread, having got there during the grinding of grain into flour.


9 posted on 10/05/2013 7:28:53 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: posterchild
The average life span for the wealthy was in the mid-30's to late 40's. Many women succumbed to birth problems, later, if not sooner. Some women just lived on and on.

Eleanor of Acquitaine lived to be in her 80's...81-82, as history writes. Imagine that.
From the Internet: Eleanor of Aquitaine (French: Aliénor d’Aquitaine; Éléonore de Guyenne; 1122 or 1124 – 1 April 1204) was one of the wealthiest and most powerful women in western Europe during the High Middle Ages, a member of the Ramnufid dynasty of rulers in southwestern France. She became Duchess of Aquitaine in her own right while she was still a child, then later queen consort of France (1137–1152) and England (1154–1189). She was the patron of literary figures such as Wace, Benoît de Sainte-Maure, and Bernart de Ventadorn.

10 posted on 10/05/2013 7:33:08 PM PDT by cloudmountain
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To: SunkenCiv

How come I never find cool stuff like this? ;)


11 posted on 10/05/2013 7:38:23 PM PDT by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Thorliveshere

There’s actually very little of that; typically the course of action for centuries has been robbing ancient burials of valuables, and more recently selling antiquities into private collections throughout the world. The muzzies concentrate on destroying Christianity, killing Christians, kidnapping and “marrying” underage Christian girls, burning and otherwise defacing churches, etc.


12 posted on 10/05/2013 7:41:56 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

I have never heard of carvings and hieroglyphics on the back of the statues


13 posted on 10/05/2013 7:46:23 PM PDT by winodog
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To: mylife

Alas, these are usually found only in Egypt. ;’)


14 posted on 10/05/2013 7:47:29 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: mylife

Rule #1- Look in the right places.


15 posted on 10/05/2013 7:51:48 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( ==> sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: SunkenCiv

“Let my people go!”


16 posted on 10/05/2013 7:52:18 PM PDT by Viennacon
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To: SunkenCiv
Life-size statue of king Ramses II found in Sharkiya

And I think we all know how painful that can be..


17 posted on 10/05/2013 7:53:16 PM PDT by AndrewB (FUBO)
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To: winodog

The message got carved on any convenient surface, like these cool block statues popular during the 18th Dynasty; this one portrays Senenmut, lover and architect of the chick pharaoh Hatshepsut, shown here with their daughter Neferure.

http://www.touregypt.net/featurestories/cachette9.htm

There are other examples of these two, not in block form. There’s also this one of Senenmut by himself, in the block form:

http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_image.aspx?image=ps335040.jpg&retpage=15548


18 posted on 10/05/2013 7:55:37 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: smokingfrog; SunkenCiv

On the bright side I have probably turned up more flat irons, hog scrapers and sloans liniment bottles than these guys ;)


19 posted on 10/05/2013 7:56:48 PM PDT by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Viennacon

By the time Ramses II was born, Moses had been dead for centuries. The canopic jars of Ramses II had their contents examined just a few years ago, and the radiocarbon dating of his guts turned out to be nearly 800 years “too young”.


20 posted on 10/05/2013 7:58:18 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: AndrewB

21 posted on 10/05/2013 7:58:30 PM PDT by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: AndrewB

Well, see, right there, all kinds of potential comments roll up to the surface, and I can’t post *any* of them. ;’)


22 posted on 10/05/2013 7:59:09 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: mylife

:’)


23 posted on 10/05/2013 7:59:47 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Hathor was hot


24 posted on 10/05/2013 8:01:41 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Play the 'Knockout Game' with someone owning a 9mm and you get what you deserve)
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To: VeniVidiVici

Ultimately I broke up with her, she just wasn’t hot enough.


25 posted on 10/05/2013 8:03:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Seriously, who would believe this story anyway?)
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To: SunkenCiv

Thutmoses III more likely, but I always enjoyed ‘The Prince of Egypt’.


26 posted on 10/05/2013 8:08:21 PM PDT by Viennacon
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To: Viennacon

Thutmose III also lived centuries after Moses.


27 posted on 10/05/2013 8:12:21 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (Seriously, who would believe this story anyway?)
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To: SunkenCiv

LOL!!


28 posted on 10/05/2013 8:29:17 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Play the 'Knockout Game' with someone owning a 9mm and you get what you deserve)
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To: SunkenCiv

The controversy would stem from orthodox and unorthadox chronologies. Depending on which you follow, you might arrive at different dynasties.

http://www.tms.edu/tmsj/17f.pdf

This is a very good read. Detailed as to the chronology.


29 posted on 10/05/2013 9:09:16 PM PDT by Viennacon
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To: SunkenCiv

Professor Brier on my “Ancient Egypt” recordings observes that the Egyptians never kept records of a military defeat: they just had “victories” closer and closer to their capital!


30 posted on 10/06/2013 2:59:12 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("The heart of the matter is God's love. It always has been. It always will be."~Abp. Chaput)
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To: SunkenCiv

When I think of Ramses I think of Trojans, Big Chief, and Zer0.
The three formers covering the later. A perfect match.


31 posted on 10/06/2013 4:25:29 AM PDT by Vinnie
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To: Tax-chick

Ramses II may have set the record with his great bas relief about the Battle of Kadesh. He was comprehensively out-maneuvered, had his ass kicked, was in grave danger of capture, and when it was clear that the battle was lost, he fled on his chariot, leaving much of his army to be captured and/or slaughtered.

He managed to escape back to Egypt, preparing as well as he could for an invasion that his adversary had no intention of attempting, then they came to an agreement, a treaty that amounted to a mutual non-aggression pact that defined their geographical spheres of influence. Ramses II spent the rest of his very long reign aggrandizing himself with monumental statues, including some made by other pharaohs and modified to look more like himself. Most famously now, KV-5 was rediscovered by Kent Weeks et al, and found to have been the group tomb of Ramses’ sons, perhaps over a hundred.

Meanwhile the Middle East continued to struggle through interdynastic warfare until first the Persian rule, then the Romans, and a series of conquests by different ethnic groups claiming the caliphate.


32 posted on 10/06/2013 7:00:09 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: Viennacon

The conventional (pseudo)chronology stretches and duplicates parts of the Egyptian 2nd IP and New Kingdom; Zahi Hawass’ response to scientific dating results is, the methods don’t work in Egypt. It’s a matter of, my professor said, I believe it, that settles it.

There isn’t any way to fit the conventional timeline to the linear historical events in the Old Testament — and that’s exactly the reason for the insistence that the conventional timeline can’t be modified.

from that PDF:

“A belief in biblical inerrancy necessitates an accompanying belief in the Bible’s historical accuracy. Biblical history can be harmonized with Egyptian history, claims to the contrary notwithstanding. Israel’s exodus from Egypt in 1446 B.C. fits with the chronology of the 18th Dynasty pharaohs in Egyptian records.”

Egyptian history has to be harmonized with that of neighboring peoples, most significantly with the OT timeline, rather than the other way around. Continued to hold a belief in the inerrancy of the Egyptian pseudochronology necessitates an accompanying rejection of the entire text of the Bible.


33 posted on 10/06/2013 7:03:05 AM PDT by SunkenCiv (It's no coincidence that some "conservatives" echo the hard left.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Yes, Dr. Brier also mentioned that Ramses redesigned previous Pharoahs’ monuments. Quite an ego ... although at least he obviously had the virility to go with it!


34 posted on 10/06/2013 7:45:57 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("The heart of the matter is God's love. It always has been. It always will be."~Abp. Chaput)
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To: SunkenCiv

The dates of the Egyptian dynasties are still largely based on Manetho’s records.

“Although we know that many of his divisions are arbitrary and that there was many a dynastic change where he indicates none... his dynasties divide the kings into convenient groups which have so long been employed in modern study of Egyptian history that it is now impossible to dispense with them.”

of Manetho’s record “a late, careless and uncritical compilation, which can be proven wrong from the contemporary monuments in the vast majority of cases, where such documents have survived.”

- J.H. Breasted

There are problems here due to an assumption that Manetho was recording the history in a classic chronological fashion.

It’s fair to assume that this incomplete record is not without error or misinterpretation, not to mention that dating for the Exodus and other events is also open to error and misinterpretation.
If Egypt allowed more extensive excavation,especially Red Sea diving, answers might be found. Unfortunately, Islam has a way of putting up roadblocks.


35 posted on 10/06/2013 7:51:20 AM PDT by Viennacon
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To: SunkenCiv

New name for some special ethnic groups!


36 posted on 10/07/2013 7:56:12 AM PDT by WaldenPond (No Taxation Without Representation)
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