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WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 43 OCTOBER 25, 2013
Free Republic | October 25, 2013 | greeneyes

Posted on 10/25/2013 12:44:35 PM PDT by greeneyes

The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. There is no telling where it will go and... that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!

NOTE: This is a once a week ping list. We do post to the thread during the week. Links to related articles and discussions which might be of interest are welcomed, so feel free to post them at any time.


TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: agriculture; food; gardening; hobby
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We are having a great day here in Missouri. It's sunshine, and cool great for working outside. We had the first freeze of the season last night. That means we can now plant the winter wheat. Guess what I'll be doing this weekend?

Along with the wheat, I'll be planting some rye and vetch. Just read some articles that vetch would help fight the fungus that attacks cukes and watermelon vines.

I got all my tomato branches hacked off and stuck in water to grow some roots. Didn't really have time to stick them in dirt. Dug up lots of pepper plants with flowers and small peppers budding and transplanted to pots for the indoor garden.

I have been collecting nature's bounty this week too. Ripened persimmons for breakfast and/or lunch. Just bringing in the ripe ones. The rest I'm going to process as I harvest in various ways to see what works best. Starting with the Euell Gibbons method of layering them with sugar in a jar.

Also bringing in the hickory nuts. Hubby is bringing in the walnuts and butter nuts. It reminds me of the old song Bringing in the Sheaves for some reason. We are so lucky to have these incredible nut trees and the persimmons.

Hope you are all doing well and have a great weekend. God Bless.

1 posted on 10/25/2013 12:44:35 PM PDT by greeneyes
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To: greeneyes; Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; ...

Pinging the List.


2 posted on 10/25/2013 12:51:39 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
My brother-in-law gave the wife and I some butternut squash. Wife cleaned one and cut it into 3 inch long pieces. Placed them on a cookie sheet that is lined with foil and the skin side down. Bake at 375 F. for 1.5 hrs. Delicious.

Don't even need sugar or anything. Any pieces left over can be microwaved the next day.

3 posted on 10/25/2013 12:54:01 PM PDT by Parmy
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To: greeneyes

My winter wheat. I sowed it by hand, so it's patchy. Very patchy... lol... but that's ok. It's organic material to be turned under for the tobacco that will go there next spring.

/johnny

4 posted on 10/25/2013 12:55:18 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: greeneyes

There are some real omens for a long and hard winter, or as someone at the Farmer’s Almanac said, “A whole bunch of adjectives, followed by the word ‘cold’.”


5 posted on 10/25/2013 12:59:10 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Welfare is the new euphemism for Eugenics.)
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To: Parmy

I love doing that with butternut squash. I even freeze it afterwards. I just hate peeling it.


6 posted on 10/25/2013 1:04:31 PM PDT by gattaca ("Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal." Thomas Jefferson)
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To: greeneyes

Good afternoon.

Euell Gibbons, now there’s a name I hadn’t heard in a while.


7 posted on 10/25/2013 1:05:44 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (Phil. 4:13)
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To: Parmy

That’s amazing. No salt either?


8 posted on 10/25/2013 1:07:06 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: gattaca

Prepared this way, the peel is left on. Kind of like when eating eating a potato with its skin on.


9 posted on 10/25/2013 1:07:40 PM PDT by Parmy
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To: JRandomFreeper

What kind of winter wheat is that?


10 posted on 10/25/2013 1:07:54 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Oh yeh, that reminds me, I bought the Farmers Almanac at the store the other day - haven’t gotten around to looking at it yet.


11 posted on 10/25/2013 1:09:00 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: rightly_dividing

Sung to the tuen of ‘Where have all the flowers gone?” Ewell Gibbons ate the all.


12 posted on 10/25/2013 1:09:25 PM PDT by Parmy
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
We had our first hard frost here in SW Pennsylvania just this morning. But my Better Boy variety tomatoes had shriveled up and quite producing more than one month ago. A family friend was still getting production from his Early Girl variety until just last night.

Generally, I have a bucket or more of green tomatoes to pick before the first frost. I wrap them in newspaper and let them ripen off the vine. I'm still pulling ripened tomatoes out of the bucket until mid-November, sometimes even longer. But not this year.

I've read that there's another variety of the noxious stink bug which is supposed to be moving here by next summer. Maybe a hard winter is just what we need to slow the invasion.

13 posted on 10/25/2013 1:09:41 PM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Parmy

I’ll try that. Thanks


14 posted on 10/25/2013 1:10:29 PM PDT by gattaca ("Nothing can stop the man with the right mental attitude from achieving his goal." Thomas Jefferson)
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To: rightly_dividing

Indeed. Hubby read that book Stalking the Wild Asparagus, and went around foraging and cooking stuff for the next 2 or 3 years.LOL

That book is around here somewhere.


15 posted on 10/25/2013 1:11:01 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
Hard white winter wheat. That's what the container says. Doesn't really matter because it's going to be tilled under. It's about a month old.

/johnny

16 posted on 10/25/2013 1:12:36 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Yeh, just curious. I have the red winter wheat. Hubby may have some white that I can use. He’s talking about planting alfalfa to turn under instead of the wheat this year.


17 posted on 10/25/2013 1:15:09 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
If I had it, I would. I may plant peanuts in between the tobacco plants after the tobacco are up pretty good.

/johnny

18 posted on 10/25/2013 1:17:50 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: greeneyes; JRandomFreeper

It’s over at Johnny’s house, I think. :)


19 posted on 10/25/2013 1:21:36 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (Phil. 4:13)
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To: greeneyes

Temps in Central Texas are in the 70s with nighttime in the 40s. We usually get the first cold snap on Halloween so the garden is quickly coming to an end.

I brought in a bucket of tomatoes and peppers a couple days ago so need to get them in the freezer. I froze a tray of bell earlier this week. The Improved Porters are finally putting on but they don’t have much flavor so not very impressed with them. Still nothing from the Amish Plum, Husky Cherry, Brandywine or Cherokee though they’ve been healthy all spring and summer.

Yesterday, I gave some Porters and that unknown pepper to the neighbor and a jar of peach jelly that finally set after a month. The neighbor said the corn jelly (that never set) was a great substitute for honey and put her order in for more next summer so all wasn’t lost with that frugal experiment.

I brought in the first 4 okras just now. There’s a couple more little ones out there but the deer will probably get them tonight like they’ve done with the others. The corn is nothing but sad sticks with tassels. Apparently deer don’t like the tassels.


20 posted on 10/25/2013 1:33:22 PM PDT by bgill (This reply was mined before it was posted.)
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To: greeneyes
Last three nights were 32, 32, and 30, in the Chicagoland area, and where the leaves touched the plastic, I noticed today they were blackened. In the third picture, I counted some 7-8 tomatoes. And on the larger plant on the right in the greenhouse, there are 4-5 good-sized fruits, albeit still green; we're planning on having fried green tomatoes this Sunday for our family meal. Yum!
21 posted on 10/25/2013 1:54:20 PM PDT by mlizzy (If people spent an hour a week in Eucharistic adoration, abortion would be ended. --Mother Teresa)
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To: greeneyes

Not much different than last week here. I did notice the oranges are starting to turn color. We’ve have fresh limes for several weeks now. Garden is growing well with all the rain.


22 posted on 10/25/2013 2:04:06 PM PDT by Arrowhead1952 (The Second Amendment is NOT about the right to hunt. It IS a right to shoot tyrants.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Peanuts will be an expanded crop for me next year. They did well enough in the 3x4 experimental area to deserve it. They don’t give as much biomass though, but that is why I grow winter wheat so often.


23 posted on 10/25/2013 2:11:04 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: rightly_dividing

LOL.


24 posted on 10/25/2013 2:11:29 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: mlizzy

Those plants are looking good. Did you use light for heat too?


25 posted on 10/25/2013 2:13:11 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: bgill

If your nights are in the 40’s, you probably won’t see any progress with the tomatoes. They need 50s at night. You could try covering them with row covers or plastic in the evening.

It also helps if you have surrounded them with stones or bricks on the north, east, and west sides a foot or two high. The sun will heat the rocks and release the warmth after the sun goes down and the row cover/plastic helps keep it in.


26 posted on 10/25/2013 2:22:07 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: rightly_dividing; greeneyes; JRandomFreeper; sockmonkey; All

A while ago, Prissy started barking so I let her out into the garden and there was a big squirrel under the roof of the lower deck. He had a round yellow something in his mouth. He left there and jumped on the high brick wall, still with that yellow ball in his mouth, then went to the end of the wall and out into one of the trees.

I don’t have any yellow balls on any plants. There is a bag of potting soil mix with something growing in it and I wasn’t sure that wasn’t a wild tomato plant so I had it on the deck – it is split down the middle with this small green runners of a plant. Those yellow mushroom kinds of growths show up sometime in plant soil and I think he got one out of that bag and took off with it. I hope it’s poison.

I see a bloom on one of the spindly tomato plants that I screwed up on when I planted those.

I’m bringing up again the book I bought, Healing Spices, $19.39, Amazon. I’ve been reading in this book and it’s like a medicine bottle that gives the dosage of the medicine you are taking for a certain medical problem. This is the Bible for spices. Some you would not call a spice, such as onions or sun-dried tomatoes.

Listed below are the “spices” and what they do. This book was written by a research doctor at MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. You see, scientific tests are reported on each of these spices and the amounts given to bring about the listed results. You will know what to use them for and how much to give. We hear this is good for that but we don’t know if that is true or how much to use. This takes the guess work out of knowing how to use these spices for certain ailments. These are not “old wives tales”, but scientific test results.

Also, beginning on page 293, is a list of medical conditions with a list next to that of which spices to use, and another list next to that one which gives the amounts to take for that medical condition. In almost every case, there is more than one spice to take for that medical condition.

Right now, I have no planted spices. I will make a list from this long list of spices based on what I think will grow here and that will be what I grow. Now, I will know what they do to a body.

If we had a time when regular medical care could not be had, this would be my book to use these spices/medicines for medical care. And, I will use them now for my own conditions, along with my regular prescriptions. Here is a list of “spices” covered:

Ajowan Nature’s Pharmacy
Allspice An All-Around healer
Almond Heart Guard
Amchur Mango with an extra pinch of health
Aniseed The ultimate Digestif
Asafoetida Fabled Flu Fighter
Basil The Garden of Youth
Bay Leaf An Infusion of Antioxidants
Black Cumin Seed the Amazing Cure-All
Black Pepper The King of Spices
Caraway After Dinner Relief
Cardamom The Stomach Sentinel
Celery Seed First Aid for Gout
Chile Red-Hot Healer
Cinnamon Balancing Blood Sugar
Clove Pain Relief’s loyal Servant
Cocoa How Sweet It Is
Coconut The Fat That Burns Calories
Coriander Taming Tummy Troubles
Cumin Keeping Diabetes Under Control
Curry Leaf From Mother Nature’s Branch of Medicine
Fennel Seed Calming Cramps and Colic
Fenugreek Seed Defeating Diabetes
Galangal Better Health, Courtesy of Thailand
Garlic Strong Enough to Battle Heart Disease
Ginger Quieting that Queasy Feeling
Horseradish Potent Infection Fighter
Juniper Berry The Natural Diuretic
Kokum India’s Exotic Weight-Loss Wonder
Lemongrass The Calming Spice
Marjoram The Mediterranean Miracle
Mint The Essence of Freshness
Mustard Seed Faithful to good health
Nutmeg A Sprinkle of Healing
Onion Too Strong for Cancer
Oregano Infection Protection
Parsley Antioxidant Enhancer
Pumpkin Seed Shielding the Prostate
Rosemary Cancer Guard for the Grill
Saffron Lifting Your Spirit
Sage Improving Memory and Mood
Sesame Seed Oiling Your Circulation
Star Anise Beautiful and Healthful
Sun Dried Tomato Guardian of Men’s Health
Tamarind A Beloved Folk Remedy
Thyme Anti-Microbial, Pro-health
Turmeric Leading Crusader against Disease
Vanilla Health in Your Dessert
Wasabi Hot Ally against Cancer


27 posted on 10/25/2013 2:36:25 PM PDT by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
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To: greeneyes

I put a pan over the one floodlight we have out there (as you suggested); I believe it’s 60w. Not sure how much more to do. Can’t imagine getting too many more fruits, but there are a number of blooms. I might put a little more straw around the back of the enclosure and maybe a little more at the sides. I’m sort of surprised [but very happy, cuz they are so pretty] at how well they are doing; all exposed tomatoes in our area have now succumbed to the frosts.


28 posted on 10/25/2013 2:41:51 PM PDT by mlizzy (If people spent an hour a week in Eucharistic adoration, abortion would be ended. --Mother Teresa)
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To: greeneyes; All
Today, I watched a Utube guy take cuttings from a tomato plant to root it and he had examples of the ones he had already rooted. I have never done this, know nothing about it, so I will use his method to see if I can root one from the Mortgage Lifters I have outside. By coincidence, he was rooting Mortgage Lifters.

You snip off suckers to root. Where the stalk meets a limb, in that spot where they come together, is where the sucker will start growing. Snip it off with your hand, put it in a jar of water in the house and it will root. When the roots are substantial enough to hold it in the soil, plant it.

He had examples of rooting in water and planting and just putting the sucker in the soil when you snip it off, and those rooted in water were excellent and the ones planted in the ground before rooting, were pitiful, some dead, but a few still alive.

29 posted on 10/25/2013 2:53:11 PM PDT by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
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To: Marcella

As much garlic and onion that we use, we should be immune to heart disease and cancer.

My rationale on most stuff is “If a little bit is good, then way too much is just about right”


30 posted on 10/25/2013 2:55:09 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (Phil. 4:13)
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To: Marcella
I hope it’s poison.
-lol-

Thanks for info on the spices! This is a book I'm going to get. I've used many of them in battling health issues. Oregano, Turmeric extract, basil, and on and on. Lately we've been making a fresh organic juice of apples, significant amounts of fresh ginger and parsley, with a few drops of lemon essential oil. Very tasty! We serve over ice in tall champagne glasses we keep in the freezer.

I'm going to try to work some of these into the garden in the spring. Thanks again!
31 posted on 10/25/2013 2:57:20 PM PDT by mlizzy (If people spent an hour a week in Eucharistic adoration, abortion would be ended. --Mother Teresa)
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To: Marcella

We took cutting from some mater plants a while back and it worked great. We skipped the water part by using rooting hormone powder and planting in pots directly


32 posted on 10/25/2013 2:58:42 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (Phil. 4:13)
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To: rightly_dividing; Marcella

Then what do you do [in the winter] with these tomato plants that you’ve rooted?


33 posted on 10/25/2013 3:02:40 PM PDT by mlizzy (If people spent an hour a week in Eucharistic adoration, abortion would be ended. --Mother Teresa)
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To: mlizzy

I guess I will have to answer that next spring. lol

Seriously, we put 8- 4ft grow lights on our back porch along with some mega thick plastic sheeting and put our plants of all description there for the winter, which is short and mild here in SE Texas. We may use a heater there this year. We keep tropicals and succulents there without major problems. We should put them outside during warm sunny periods during cold weather, but it is a major effort to move them; we have a half dozen 20”- 24” containers and too many to count 12”-20” containers and my wife and I cannot handle them easily.

The maters, being food crop, may warrant in-house overwintering, along with my hot peppers.


34 posted on 10/25/2013 3:18:46 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (Phil. 4:13)
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To: mlizzy

“Then what do you do [in the winter] with these tomato plants that you’ve rooted?”

Well, I have never rooted one so the test is can I get one to root? I’d rather try now than next spring or summer so I can be sure I can do it by then. I’m in more south eastern Texas and we have a longer growing season than those even in central Texas but a tomato plant started now surely won’t make it through a winter here even though it doesn’t get very cold here. We usually have below freezing temps about twice a year lasting a couple of days and that’s it.


35 posted on 10/25/2013 3:23:29 PM PDT by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
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To: Marcella

Dang squirrels.LOL

Sounds like a great book. Several years back my daughter gave me a book for Christmas that you might also be interested in. It has over 100 herbs.

The title is Herbal Medicine - the expanded Commission E monographs.

It is also scientific. For each herb, there is:

1. General Overview
2. Description
3. Chemistry and Pharmacology
4. Uses
5. Contraindications
6. Side effects
7. Use during pregnancy and lactation
8. Interactions with other drugs
9. Dosage and Administration
10. References and resources list

There is a handy cross section by type of disease or condition. Followed by Appendices of interesting info.

These are often perscribed by physicians in Europe rather than expensive pills by big pharma.


36 posted on 10/25/2013 3:24:58 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Is your soil sandy?


37 posted on 10/25/2013 3:27:57 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: mlizzy

Nice!


38 posted on 10/25/2013 3:29:29 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: mlizzy

You can chop off the limbs that have flowers, and stick them in water or dirt, and roots will form at each of the nubs that are covered. Pick off excess leaves, keep at least 4 or 5 maybe more.

Then you can put them in a pot, and hand fertilize. I have grown tomatoes indoors this way several times.


39 posted on 10/25/2013 3:30:03 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: trisham
Very sandy silt, like talcum powder. It's actually hard to wet the soil, the water just runs off. I don't know how many tons of organic material I've put into the soil to get a garden.

The new area, which will be for tobacco next year, hasn't had all of the treatment yet.

/johnny

40 posted on 10/25/2013 3:30:23 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: rightly_dividing; mlizzy
mlizzy, rightly lives about ten miles from me so we have the same type winter.

rightly, if you can keep a tomato plant indoors in the house, then I could, too. You know I don't know a lot about plant life yet, but if I can root a tomato plant, when it gets cold, I'll just bring it in the house. How about a tomato plant for a center piece in the middle of the dining table, or, better yet, use one for a Christmas Tree. I think I just have a new Christmas Tree. I'll try to find a sucker tomorrow and get it in water.

I think my sister-in-law and her husband are going to come here Christmas, and they know I'm strange, but even they would laugh at a tomato plant for a Christmas Tree.

41 posted on 10/25/2013 3:32:57 PM PDT by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
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To: Marcella

I do something similar at the end of the season. I cut off the limbs that still have tomatoes and make sure I have several joints. Pick off the bottom leaves, and bury the stem in dirt, or use water.

Sometimes I use rooting powder, but not usually necessary. Pollinate by hand. Have grown tomatoes through the winter indoors using the fall cuttings.


42 posted on 10/25/2013 3:33:13 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: mlizzy; rightly_dividing

Put them in front of a south or west window. Add a couple of hours or so of grow light after sunset. Hand fertilize and you should get some slow growing tomatoes.


43 posted on 10/25/2013 3:35:40 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

In our old house we were sitting on a big sand hill. Thank goodness for compost. We put all kitchen scraps, including coffee grounds, coffee, unbleached coffee filters, lobster shells, clam shells, mussel shells, shrimp shells, leaves, any healthy waste from the garden, mown grass, salt marsh hay that was used as mulch during the winter, rabbit droppings..I could probably go on, but.. :)


44 posted on 10/25/2013 3:37:36 PM PDT by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: Marcella

Ping to # 39.


45 posted on 10/25/2013 3:38:35 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

” Have grown tomatoes through the winter indoors using the fall cuttings.”

BUT HAVE YOU EVER HAD A TOMATO CHRISTMAS TREE!


46 posted on 10/25/2013 3:40:09 PM PDT by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
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To: rightly_dividing; Marcella; greeneyes

Thank you, thank you ALL, for all the information. Fascinating! I might try this.


47 posted on 10/25/2013 3:47:51 PM PDT by mlizzy (If people spent an hour a week in Eucharistic adoration, abortion would be ended. --Mother Teresa)
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To: Marcella

I never called it that, but we did have a tomato plant on the table where we ate at Christmas. I didn’t hang any ornaments on it though. Just some foil around the pot, and a ribbon around the top part of the pot.


48 posted on 10/25/2013 3:48:16 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes; rightly_dividing; JRandomFreeper; All

Another blasted squirrel was just in the garden. I stood at the door and watched. He made a trip around the net room then went to the big squash and jumped into the barrel. I was out there in a flash and off he went. I didn’t put the tall squash in the net room as that would have been somewhat of a major move since there is 11 feet of it. So, I have wrapped the barrel with row cover and up the plant some. He can’t get inside the barrel now.

I’m going to set the animal trap right now and put it close to the big squash. If I catch him tonight, I am going to beat him to death tomorrow and hang his carcass where his friends can see it.


49 posted on 10/25/2013 4:06:27 PM PDT by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
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To: Marcella

LOL. Such violence against such a little creature.LOL


50 posted on 10/25/2013 4:10:17 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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