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A Sailorís Dying Wish
idrivewarships ^ | November 10, 2013 | Jennie Haskamp

Posted on 11/13/2013 12:47:26 PM PST by virgil283

Electrician’s Mate Second Class William Bud Cloud, Pearl Harbor Survivor of the USS Dewey (DD-349) visits the new USS Dewey (DDG 105). " He died 13 days later. For 12 of those 13 days he talked about the Dewey, her Sailors and his visit to San Diego. Everyone who came to the house had to hear the story, see the photos, hold the coins, read the plaques."......H/T iowntheworld.com

(Excerpt) Read more at idrivewarships.wordpress.com ...


TOPICS: Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS: veteransday
"After signing my Pop, EM2 Bud Cloud (circa Pearl Harbor) up for hospice care, the consolation prize I’d given him (for agreeing it was OK to die) was a trip to “visit the Navy in San Diego.”

I emailed my friend and former Marine sergeant, Mrs. Mandy McCammon, who’s currently serving as a Navy Public Affairs Officer, at midnight on 28 May. I asked Mandy if she had enough pull on any of the bases in San Diego to get me access for the day so I could give Bud, who served on USS Dewey (DD-349), a windshield tour.

The next day she sent me an email from the current USS Dewey (DDG 105)’s XO, CDR Mikael Rockstad, inviting us down to the ship two days later.

We linked up with Mandy outside Naval Base San Diego and carpooled to the pier where we were greeted by CMDCM Joe Grgetich and a squad-sized group of Sailors. Bud started to cry before the doors of the van opened. He’d been oohing and pointing at the cyclic rate as we approached the pier, but when we slowed down and Mandy said, “They’re all here for you, Bud,” he was overwhelmed.

After we were all out of the van directly in front of the Dewey, shaking hands and exchanging pleasantries, Petty Officer Simon introduced himself and said as the ship’s Sailor of the Year he had the honor of pushing Bud’s wheelchair for the day. Unbeknownst to us, they’d decided to host Bud aboard the Dewey, not at the Dewey. And so they carried him aboard. None of us expected him to go aboard the ship. I’d told him we were going down to the base and would have the chance to meet and greet a few of the Sailors from the new Dewey. He was ecstatic. The day before, he asked every few hours if we were “still going down to visit the boys from the Dewey,” and “do they know I was on the Dewey, too?”

Once aboard, we were greeted by the CO, CDR Jake Douglas, the XO and a reinforced platoon-sized group of Sailors. To say it was overwhelming is an understatement. These men and women waited in line to introduce themselves to Bud. They shook his hand, asked for photos with him, and swapped stories. It was simply amazing.

They didn’t just talk to him, they listened.

Bud’s voice was little more than a weak whisper at this point and he’d tell a story and then GMC Eisman or GSCS Whynot would repeat it so all of the Sailors on deck could hear. In the midst of the conversations, Petty Officer Flores broke contact with the group. Bud was telling a story and CMDCM Grgetich was repeating the details when Flores walked back into view holding a huge photo of the original USS Dewey. That moment was priceless. Bud stopped mid-sentence and yelled, “There she is!” They patiently stood there holding the photo while he told them about her armament, described the way it listed after it was hit, and shared other details about the attacks on Pearl Harbor.

Bud finally admitted how tired he was after more than an hour on deck. While they were finishing up goodbyes and taking last minute photographs, GMC Eisman asked if it’d be OK to bring Sailors up to visit Bud in a few months after a Chief’s board. I hadn’t said it yet because I didn’t want it to dampen the spirit of the day, but I quietly explained to GMC Eisman the reason we’d asked for the visit was simple: Bud was dying.

I told him they were welcome to come up any time they wanted, but I suspected Bud had about a month left to live. Almost without hesitation, he asked if the crew could provide the burial honors when the time came. I assured him that’d be an honor we’d welcome.

Leaving the ship was possibly more emotional than boarding.

They piped him ashore. CMDCM Grgetich leaned in and quietly told me how significant that honor was and who it’s usually reserved for as we headed towards the gangplank. Hearing “Electrician’s Mate Second Class William Bud Cloud, Pearl Harbor Survivor, departing” announced over the 1MC was surreal.

Later that night Bud sat in his recliner, hands full of ship’s coins and declared, “I don’t care what you do with my power tools; you better promise you’ll bury me with these.”

He died 13 days later. For 12 of those 13 days he talked about the Dewey, her Sailors and his visit to San Diego. Everyone who came to the house had to hear the story, see the photos, hold the coins, read the plaques.

True to his word, GMC Eisman arranged the details for a full honors burial. The ceremony was simple yet magnificent. And a perfect sendoff for an ornery old guy who never, ever stopped being proud to be a Sailor. After the funeral, the Sailors came back to the house for the reception and spent an hour with the family. This may seem like a small detail, but it’s another example of them going above and beyond the call of duty, and it meant more to the family than I can explain.

There are more photos, and I’m sure I missed a detail, or a name. What I didn’t miss and will never forget, is how unbelievable the men and women of the USS Dewey were. They opened their ship and their hearts and quite literally made a dream come true for a dying Sailor.

They provided the backdrop for “This is the best day of my life, daughter. I never in my whole life dreamed I’d step foot on the Dewey again or shake the hand of a real life Sailor.”

1 posted on 11/13/2013 12:47:26 PM PST by virgil283
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To: virgil283

the #### screen is bleary


2 posted on 11/13/2013 12:49:01 PM PST by virgil283 (When the sun spins, the cross appears, and the skies burn red)
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To: virgil283

I am crying. God Bless Mr. Cloud!


3 posted on 11/13/2013 12:51:51 PM PST by MeganC (Support Matt Bevin to oust Mitch McConnell! https://mattbevin.com/)
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To: virgil283

OH MY
It is all I can do to hold it together here and not turn into blubbering sobbing slob right here at my desk. Thanks for sharing. That was great!


4 posted on 11/13/2013 12:54:13 PM PST by NEMDF
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To: virgil283

Wow. Just wow.


5 posted on 11/13/2013 12:55:12 PM PST by Mr. Lucky
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To: virgil283

Thank you Jennie for sharing and virgil for posting.


6 posted on 11/13/2013 12:57:52 PM PST by Alaska Wolf (I)
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To: virgil283
They piped him ashore. CMDCM Grgetich leaned in and quietly told me how significant that honor was and who it’s usually reserved for as we headed towards the gangplank. Hearing “Electrician’s Mate Second Class William Bud Cloud, Pearl Harbor Survivor, departing” announced over the 1MC was surreal.

Later that night Bud sat in his recliner, hands full of ship’s coins and declared, “I don’t care what you do with my power tools; you better promise you’ll bury me with these.”

He died 13 days later. For 12 of those 13 days he talked about the Dewey, her Sailors and his visit to San Diego. Everyone who came to the house had to hear the story, see the photos, hold the coins, read the plaques.

True to his word, GMC Eisman arranged the details for a full honors burial. The ceremony was simple yet magnificent. And a perfect sendoff for an ornery old guy who never, ever stopped being proud to be a Sailor. After the funeral, the Sailors came back to the house for the reception and spent an hour with the family. This may seem like a small detail, but it’s another example of them going above and beyond the call of duty, and it meant more to the family than I can explain.

My Lord and my God, I had thought that honor and respect was all but dead in our military today. Thank you for posting this.

7 posted on 11/13/2013 1:02:24 PM PST by Alex Murphy ("the defacto Leader of the FR Calvinist Protestant Brigades")
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To: virgil283

What a beautiful story. Thanks for posting.

My late uncle survived Pearl Harbor aboard The Detroit. he Detroit got underway first and led the other ships out of the Harbor so that the whole fleet wasn’t lost that terrible day.


8 posted on 11/13/2013 1:02:52 PM PST by afraidfortherepublic
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To: virgil283

Hand Salute...........................two


9 posted on 11/13/2013 1:03:18 PM PST by bmwcyle (People who do not study history are destine to believe really ignorant statements.)
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To: virgil283

I thought I was over this bout of sniffles. Rest in peace American hero. God bless the crew of the USS Dewey. And thank you for your efforts for an old sailor.


10 posted on 11/13/2013 1:05:43 PM PST by armydawg505
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To: virgil283

Great and sad story.
My pappy was at Hickman Barracks that day..Sig Corp
Towards the end he got old fast but hung on to attend the 50th and was gone a few months later.He brought home some water from Pearl and kept it by his side till the end.Priest sprinkled in on the casket.
Bro in law was a NavAir guy stationed in HI.The cremains were later dropped some where over Pearl out of a P3.

These guys,and gals(Mom was a Sergeant,taught code and typing) were an amazing bunch.Never mentioned it growing up,an occasional sea story or to but no need for praise.They did what they did cause they had to,the country was at stake.

Still is


11 posted on 11/13/2013 1:06:52 PM PST by CGASMIA68
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To: virgil283

I don’t know who posted this but it needs fixing. It went all blurry about half way through.


12 posted on 11/13/2013 1:07:23 PM PST by muir_redwoods (Don't fire until you see the blue of their helmets)
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To: virgil283

Wow...need to warn a guy before you have them read this. Hanky alert. Thanks for posting/sharing.


13 posted on 11/13/2013 1:09:47 PM PST by Sergio (An object at rest cannot be stopped! - The Evil Midnight Bomber What Bombs at Midnight)
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To: Alex Murphy

Out in the ranks it’s not. That is where our hope lies...


14 posted on 11/13/2013 1:11:30 PM PST by ejonesie22 (8/30/10, the day Truth won.)
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To: virgil283

F***, I am crying.....


15 posted on 11/13/2013 1:36:15 PM PST by Paradox (Unexpected things coming for the next few years.)
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To: virgil283

My dad was also there on that December 7th. day. He rarely talked about it but when he did, It was like he was still there.


16 posted on 11/13/2013 2:53:10 PM PST by JamesA (You done 't have to be big to stand tall)
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To: virgil283; SLB; Jeff Head
Amazing story. I just looked up the original Dewey and he must have had some stories to tell.

Dewey was at Pearl Harbor, Coral Sea, Midway, Guadalcanal landings, Eastern Solomons, Attu and Kiska, Kwajalein, Eniwetok, Tinian, Saipan, Philippine Sea, Guam, Leyte Gulf, Iwo Jima, and Okinawa, plus dozens of smaller engagements and missions. Through all of that, the only damage she received was from Typhoon Cobra on December 18, 1944, when she was heeled over 75-degrees and had her forward stack ripped off.

17 posted on 11/13/2013 3:12:05 PM PST by Stonewall Jackson (I aim to misbehave.)
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