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Help with Dog biting ....
12/4/2013 | vanity

Posted on 12/04/2013 7:00:11 PM PST by Usagi_yo

He's a male Blue point Doberman, rescued from the animal shelter at a very young adult age. He's actually grown a bit over the 2 years we've had him.

Well he's starting to have some biting problems now after 2 years. He's bitten my sister (the owner) 3 times breaking skin each time, bruising bone and requiring antibiotics. These have happened to her at night when he's sleeping with her and her husband. Seemed it was some type of sleep problem from being woke up from dead of sleep.

Now he's bitten me. I've had direct contact with the dog almost everyday and pet him, give him biscuits, he loves to get facial rubs from me.

After coming in, he had one of those giant burrs from a sweetgum tree in his front paw. I've picked them out of his paws many times, and I know how to pick up a dogs paw. Well this time he latched on to my arm, pretty vicious, drew blood in multiple locations. Deep enough I'll have to go to the Doctor and get x-ray and antibiotics.

If you own a doberman you know they don't growl or warn before biting.

Suggestions? We have 5 dogs between the two of us. We live on about 10 acres in separate dwellings with both houses fenced in for a common dog area. Non of the other dogs are problems, German Shepard, Red Heeler, Basset hound and a hybrid 1/4 wolf 1/4 Malamute the rest Husky. None of them have been a problem or challenge the doberman.

What to do? Is this fixable? My sister doesn't want to put him down. Her husband is pissed. I say have his canines pulled.

I just can't tolerate a dog like this. Not knowing it's going to go off on any slight, perceived or otherwise.


TOPICS: Agriculture; Pets/Animals
KEYWORDS: biting; doberman; dog; doggieping
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1 posted on 12/04/2013 7:00:11 PM PST by Usagi_yo
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To: JoeSixPack

ping


2 posted on 12/04/2013 7:01:22 PM PST by Perdogg (Ted Cruz-Rand Paul 2016)
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To: Joe 6-pack

ping


3 posted on 12/04/2013 7:01:51 PM PST by Perdogg (Ted Cruz-Rand Paul 2016)
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To: Usagi_yo

I know what my old daddy would have done. Actually he did do it a couple of times.

After the first bite, the dog would be pushing up daisies.


4 posted on 12/04/2013 7:03:12 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: Usagi_yo

Call Cesar Millan - the “Dog Whisperer” ... :-) ...

Short of that, I would simply get rid of the dog.


5 posted on 12/04/2013 7:04:01 PM PST by Star Traveler (Remember to keep the Messiah of Israel in the One-World Government that we look forward to coming)
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To: AnAmericanMother; Titan Magroyne; Badeye; SandRat; arbooz; potlatch; afraidfortherepublic; ...
WOOOF!

Computer Hope

The Doggie Ping list is for FReepers who would like to be notified of threads relating to all things canid. If you would like to join the Doggie Ping Pack (or be unleashed from it), FReemail me.

6 posted on 12/04/2013 7:04:05 PM PST by Joe 6-pack (Qui me amat, amat et canem meum.)
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To: Usagi_yo

How’s your insurance? Are you sure it will cover you if he bites a kid? Your entire net worth is at risk.


7 posted on 12/04/2013 7:04:19 PM PST by DManA
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To: Usagi_yo

Stew pot


8 posted on 12/04/2013 7:05:16 PM PST by S.O.S121.500 (Case back hoe for sale or trade for diesel wood chipper....Enforce the Bill of Rights. It's the Law!)
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To: Usagi_yo

Broken the skin and required treatment, the doctor is obligated by law to report the dog.
It is only going to get worse, get rid of the dog.


9 posted on 12/04/2013 7:05:54 PM PST by svcw (Not 'hope and change' but 'dopes in chains')
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To: Usagi_yo

I know what I did.

Grab collar, and insert other hand in mouth as a fist.

EAT it! You want to gnaw on it? Eat it!

No need to be cruel about it.


10 posted on 12/04/2013 7:11:26 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Usagi_yo
I got a rescue dog who had spent the first three months of his life in a chicken coop. I got him when he was about four months old. When he was about a year old he snapped at me and growled. I did some research and found out that the time he spent in the chicken coop was the very time that he needed human interaction but did not get it. So, it sort of messed him up.

I would suggest talking to your vet and seeing if he or she could recommend an animal behaviorist.

11 posted on 12/04/2013 7:11:42 PM PST by Slyfox (Satan's goal is to rub out the image of God he sees in the face of every human.)
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To: Usagi_yo

A nip I could overlook but this sounds like it’s a problem and a purposeful biting. I adore dogs but I would not keep a dog like that.


12 posted on 12/04/2013 7:11:53 PM PST by Irenic (The pencil sharpener and Elmer's glue is put away-- we've lost the red wheel barrow)
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To: Usagi_yo

Bullet


13 posted on 12/04/2013 7:13:34 PM PST by WriteOn (Truth)
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To: svcw

Yeah, a biter like that is a lawsuit waiting to happen. The really unpredictable part is that he bites if you wake him up suddenly. Most unfortunate.


14 posted on 12/04/2013 7:14:17 PM PST by PLMerite (Shut the Beyotch Down! Burn, baby, burn!)
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To: Usagi_yo

He’s now the alpha dog. No way to fix this other than to dispose of him. Someone might want it for a guard dog, but it is not suitable around people or other dogs.


15 posted on 12/04/2013 7:14:59 PM PST by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: Slyfox

Dogs should Never be abused, but you can never let them be the alpha.


16 posted on 12/04/2013 7:15:27 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Usagi_yo

The sleeping issue is easy, dogs should NEVER sleep in their owners bed. This introduces all sorts of behavioral problems due to pack order and dominance issues .

The second issue is an easy fix as well, the dog needs a muzzle whenever any sensitive work is performed. The vet needs to be informed.

However, my opinion is that this animal will continue this behavior and is a potential time bomb. This dog should NEVER be allowed around any children.

You call, but I think you know the answer...


17 posted on 12/04/2013 7:15:43 PM PST by nevergore
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To: Usagi_yo

Understand that young dogs especially will get scared and bite when you are doctoring on them or in some manner scaring them.

And there are dogs that are very protective of their home or their toys, as well as their food.

But this dog is different. By your description, if it is accurate, the dog had absolutely no reason to bite other than he has something missing.

Some dogs are just mean or have something missing. This dog is apparently one of those.

You had better get rid of him before he bites a kid. At two years old, he is what he is. He is not going to change his ways and he is getting big enough and strong enough that he can ruin, maybe even kill, an adult.

So a kid would have no chance.

Zap him.


18 posted on 12/04/2013 7:15:50 PM PST by old curmudgeon
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To: Usagi_yo

First of all. Get the dog out of the bed. The dog has decided that it is the leader of its pack and has no fear of biting them. The owners need the help of a dog trainer to retrain them and the dog.


19 posted on 12/04/2013 7:16:12 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (From time to time the.tree of liberty must be watered with the blood of tyrants and patriots.)
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To: Usagi_yo

Unless you want to contact he Dog Whisperer, I recommend getting rid of the dog and getting a nice dog.

There are too many nice dogs that need homes to warrant giving a home to a biter.

He has already showed you his tendencies, you need to pay attention to them, the dog is dangerous.


20 posted on 12/04/2013 7:16:21 PM PST by chris37 (Heartless.)
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To: Usagi_yo
One small suggestion, and if it does not work, do not keep him!

Ready... bite him back!

My German Shepard bit me (and others) when he was around 2 yrs. old. Broke my skin, 8 year old daughter in the house... I was furious! Next time he got me, I got him back... completely out of control.. grabbed some of his neck skin and bit it hard (did not break skin) and yelled in his face, you do it to me, I do it to you!! Never had an issue again, lived many many happy years! It's probably irresponsible to even share such a story, but we always thought it changed everything!

21 posted on 12/04/2013 7:16:26 PM PST by GizzyGirl
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To: Usagi_yo

Put the dog down. I put down a Jack Russel because he was a biter. He was a little dog, I kept him around too long, a big dog should be put down sooner because he could do some serious damage. Sad I know.


22 posted on 12/04/2013 7:17:29 PM PST by Ditter
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To: Usagi_yo

Non-recoverable fault. Dispose of him humanely.


23 posted on 12/04/2013 7:17:58 PM PST by Ben Mugged (The number one enemy of liberalism is reality.)
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To: GizzyGirl

Great story!! I love it! You’re a grizzly, all right — !! {^)


24 posted on 12/04/2013 7:21:22 PM PST by Finny (Thy word is a lamp unto my feet, and a light unto my path. -- Psalm 119:105)
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To: Usagi_yo

So out of selfish need of a human, this volatile dog isn’t going to be put down, but pulling his teeth out is fine? You’ve got a family making some weird decisions.


25 posted on 12/04/2013 7:22:03 PM PST by Shimmer1 (don 't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference)
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To: Usagi_yo
Get rid of him.

And I don't mean giving him to someone else.

I had dobbies, they bit but they never bit me. They bit people who thought they would break into my house and one who raised his hand to me. The last was just a warning nip because he had not actually hit me, just literally raised his hand to do so.

I had a female that I could reach into her box while she was whelping and take out each pup as it was born to check it over. She never even offered to bite.

I love dogs but there is something wrong with this one.

26 posted on 12/04/2013 7:23:45 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Usagi_yo
 photo LESDISCIPLININGBLUE_zps85fc02e9.jpg Is there any doubt that my 18 month old daughter is the boss?
27 posted on 12/04/2013 7:25:01 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

They are very protective and will bite when they see an aggressor going after an alpha member of the pack.

They need to be trained as to who are higher in the pack.
Dobermans are wonderful dogs if you train them to respect boundaries.


28 posted on 12/04/2013 7:27:09 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Usagi_yo
That is possibly correctable if you are willing to put in the time, and lots of it. But how about contacting a Doberman rescue outfit while detailing the issues in full...see if they'd take o a project? Regarding the bite you described while unacceptable that was a reflexive response to pain rather than behavioral aggression. Some dogs will react that way to pain stimulus.
29 posted on 12/04/2013 7:27:20 PM PST by Dysart (Obamacare: "We are losing money on every subscriber-- but we will make it up in volume!")
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To: yarddog

Ditto.

If I had kids....the dog would be GONE. Period. No question.


30 posted on 12/04/2013 7:27:24 PM PST by RushIsMyTeddyBear (Great vid by ShorelineMike! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KOZjJk6nbD4&feature=plcp)
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To: yarddog
I know what my old daddy would have done. Actually he did do it a couple of times. After the first bite, the dog would be pushing up daisies.

Your father and I have much in common. I have one firm rule with all my dogs. You bite me or another human for no reason and you die. It may sound mean but you just can't have animals like that around children.

31 posted on 12/04/2013 7:27:49 PM PST by KirbDog
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To: Usagi_yo

You give a clue to the problem with the comment that the biting occurs when the dog is sleeping with your sister and her husband.

This exhibits a basic misunderstanding of dog behavior. A dog will bite you when ever it feels it is your equal and will bite you more and more as time goes on if uncorrected immediately.

I believe you have already let it go on too long.

When a dog shares the sleeping space (I don’t mean the same room, I mean the covers and the bed) it is elevated to equal status. This is a nice liberal ‘we’re all equal, hearts and flowers’ kind of BS.

The problem is a dog is a pack animal in it’s DNA and it cannot be anything else. A pack animal needs to know it’s level in the pack to be happy. If a dog is allowed to be ‘equal’ with it’s owner then in the dogs mind it is Alpha. The Alpha corrects behavior it finds offensive by biting as hard or thoroughly as it’s current mood demands.

I will say this as nicely as I can; your sister and her husband have condemned this dog to death. Their misunderstanding of the doberman psyche has caused them to become subservient to this animal and it will not relinquish it’s Alpha position without a serious and vicious fight.

A Doberman is a fighting animal (a war and protection animal) from hundreds of years of breeding. The dog can behave no other way if allowed to be Alpha.

Do I say all Dobermans are bad dogs? Of course not, they can be loving and great protective family members but they must never be Alpha in the family.

It is possible this can be corrected if you can contact a ‘tough dog’ trainer and by that I do not mean some sit-stay local. It will be expensive and your sister will not like how it is handled and furthermore she will not like how she (and her husband) have to be with the dog from that second on with no letup.

The dog will watch every second it is awake for a chance to elevate itself in the pack. Bad things will happen if you slip and allow that.

Probably the kindest thing you can do for that dog is to give it to the tough dog trainer or kill it before you and your loved ones are seriously hurt (although I think you already have been by the bites you describe).

BTW, I have had and trained Akitas so I am sharing hard won information, not something I read in a book.


32 posted on 12/04/2013 7:29:42 PM PST by GOPBiker (Thank a veteran, with a smile, every chance you get. You do more good than you can know.)
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To: mylife

I did that with a pit bull. Gagged him by shoving in rather than pulling back when he bit me. dog would not come near me after that!!

Duct tape will keep them from biting!!!!


33 posted on 12/04/2013 7:29:46 PM PST by tired&retired
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To: Usagi_yo

Sorry but you cant un-train that....put him down before he bites someone that will sue the crap out of her.


34 posted on 12/04/2013 7:30:16 PM PST by Crim (Palin / West '16)
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To: tired&retired

Exactly.

Gak! Gak! Gak!

Not sure if I would try it with a Pit Bull though. :)


35 posted on 12/04/2013 7:30:45 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: tired&retired

I followed up by reinforcing good behavior.
That was a great dog.


36 posted on 12/04/2013 7:31:54 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: mylife

Also helps to have their feet off the ground...

I don’t believe in hitting dogs. Have trained many big dogs and never had a problem except when a dog is ill and in pain.

Most states have a one bite law. A dog is allowed one bite and after that the owner is liable big time.


37 posted on 12/04/2013 7:36:03 PM PST by tired&retired
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To: Usagi_yo
My ex had a sweet Doberman that suddenly attacked her father, then her.

She took "Duke" to the vet to find out what the problem was. Duke attacked the vet and that was the end of Duke.

Mind you, Duke was fun dog who lived with the family for around 6-7 years. He just went bad for some reason.

38 posted on 12/04/2013 7:36:28 PM PST by Dacus943
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To: GOPBiker

Excellent point about the bed.
Crates training sounds cruel but it is fine if you do not neglect them..

Most will find that if a dog is crate trained, they will sleep in that crate even if it is in the bedroom and the crate is open.

Mine may sleep at the foot of the bed occasionally.


39 posted on 12/04/2013 7:38:53 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Usagi_yo

a trick I use to get dogs to stop biting is I jam my finger in the corner of their mouth and force their gums between their own teeth so when they bite down they are biting themselves and realize it creates pain, works really well.


40 posted on 12/04/2013 7:39:38 PM PST by big bad easter bunny (If it weren't for coffee I would still be living with my parents!)
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To: tired&retired

I never hit my dogs.


41 posted on 12/04/2013 7:40:54 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: big bad easter bunny

Good tip for puppies.


42 posted on 12/04/2013 7:41:43 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Usagi_yo

Has this dog been neutered? I ask because I didn’t see the question asked by anyone else.

I also agree that the dog should never be allowed in bed. Where is the pack order?


43 posted on 12/04/2013 7:45:45 PM PST by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo....Sum Pro Vita - Modified Descartes)
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To: Usagi_yo
Public listing for Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists (CAAB) and Associate Certified Applied Animal Behaviorists (ACAAB)
44 posted on 12/04/2013 7:45:50 PM PST by MarMema ("If Americans really wanted Obamacare, you wouldn't need a law to make them buy it." Ted Cruz)
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To: Usagi_yo

No dog that bites me or mine stays. Period. It’s just asking for trouble


45 posted on 12/04/2013 7:46:54 PM PST by muir_redwoods (Don't fire until you see the blue of their helmets)
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To: Perdogg

Uh yeah. He’s getting away with working his way up the pack hierarchy. You should have smacked him down immediately

Sleep bedamned, he was targeting.

This is a dobby, not a stupid dog.


46 posted on 12/04/2013 7:47:41 PM PST by theneanderthal
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To: mylife

Crate training in not only not cruel it is kind.

A dog left on it’s own will seek a secluded space to sleep. A crate with the door open gives the dog 3 walls and a ceiling of security.

We always had the open crates in our bedroom and the dogs would choose where they would sleep at any given time; beside the bed, in the crate, by the door or wherever.

I always felt quite secure with that arrangement.

Pretty much too late for the OP though, unfortunately.


47 posted on 12/04/2013 7:50:17 PM PST by GOPBiker (Thank a veteran, with a smile, every chance you get. You do more good than you can know.)
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To: Usagi_yo

Is he neutered?


48 posted on 12/04/2013 7:51:50 PM PST by Irenic (The pencil sharpener and Elmer's glue is put away-- we've lost the red wheel barrow)
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To: GOPBiker

They like a den.
And it keeps them true to who they are.


49 posted on 12/04/2013 7:52:13 PM PST by mylife (Ted Cruz understands the law, and he does not fear the unlawful.)
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To: Usagi_yo

I own a 1 1/2 year old male doberman. We got him at 8 weeks and enrolled him in puppy socialization classes at like 3-4 months. He is extremely tolerant- one of the most tolerant dogs I have ever had. I never forget what he is though. A doberman can maim, mutilate and even kill a person. Your dog probably missed puppy socialization. As a rescue dog, there’s no telling what he learned during his critical impressionable puppy months. As such, this dog’s temperment is probably unsuitable for a family pet and that’s very sad because doberman’s are outstanding animals. If I had no small children and I was inclined to keep him, I would kill a few things in front of him- varmints and such. Few things scream alpha louder to a dog than watching you kill and eviscerate something and they absolutely know what the gun is all about after seeing it used a few times. A dog like this has to know you are the pack leader. He clearly doesn’t know that presently. Doberman’s are highly intelligent. They require lots of exersise or they become...difficult. They are also very sensitive and needy. They need a master. They respond very poorly to an abusive master. They are not for everyone. Plenty of dobermans have been put down or given away by people who were not suitable doberman owners. This isn’t a golden retriever. Not even close.


50 posted on 12/04/2013 7:55:07 PM PST by RC one
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