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Freeper Help Requested on Churchill Quotation
self | 12/21/2013 | LS

Posted on 12/21/2013 3:20:41 PM PST by LS

Freepers,

I am looking for a quotation that I was SURE was from Churchill to FDR, only I can't find it anywhere. It went something like this (referring to Britain's situation in 1940): "You will sell us (or give us, don't know which) what we need as long as we can pay for it, and when we can no longer pay for it, you will give it to us anyway."

I thought it was in Paul Johnson's book "Modern Times," but it isn't. Anyone know of this?


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; History
KEYWORDS: fdr; winstonchurchill

1 posted on 12/21/2013 3:20:41 PM PST by LS
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To: LS

sounds more like a stalin quote, something similar where the west will sell them everything they need as capitalists to even appear on the scene to sell the rope that they will hang us by.

I’d look or fiddle around with this as a Stalin quote
versus a Lend/Lease Churchill quote.


2 posted on 12/21/2013 3:23:52 PM PST by RBStealth (--raised by wolves, disciplined and educated by nuns.)
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To: LS

Churchill said something like “give us the tools and we will finish the job”. Now that I think about it, that was probably an American World War II poster so maybe Churchill never said anything like that.


3 posted on 12/21/2013 3:29:14 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: LS

Churchill said something like “give us the tools and we will finish the job”. Now that I think about it, that was probably an American World War II poster so maybe Churchill never said anything like that.


4 posted on 12/21/2013 3:30:13 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: LS

Don’t know this one, but here is a Churchill quote that 0.00, the Dhimmis and RINOs could stand to read and contemplate on:

“Some people regard private enterprise as a predatory tiger to be shot. Others look on it as a cow they can milk. Not enough people see it as a healthy horse, pulling a sturdy wagon.”
Winston Churchill


5 posted on 12/21/2013 3:33:27 PM PST by A Formerly Proud Canadian (I once was blind, but now I see...)
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To: LS

Here is your quote:

“We shall go on paying dollars for as long as we can, but I should like to feel reasonably sure that when we can pay no more, you will give us the stuff all the same.” — Winston Churchill, May 15, 1940 letter to President Roosevelt (pp. 24-25, “Their Finest Hour).


6 posted on 12/21/2013 3:36:39 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
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To: LS

If I am not mistaken, the quote you are looking was spoken about the development of the Lend-Lease initiative. Not sure where it can be located.


7 posted on 12/21/2013 3:37:07 PM PST by RoosterRedux (The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing -- Socrates)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

Good on you!


8 posted on 12/21/2013 3:37:55 PM PST by RoosterRedux (The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing -- Socrates)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

Now, that’s an excellent bit of research.


9 posted on 12/21/2013 3:40:17 PM PST by loveliberty2
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To: A Formerly Proud Canadian

Beautiful


10 posted on 12/21/2013 3:42:32 PM PST by Rock Eye Jack
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To: LS

There were some reminiscences in his History of the English Speaking Peoples about his conversations with Roosevelt on the subject of Britain’s ability to pay. I don’t remember that quote or sentiment though.


11 posted on 12/21/2013 3:43:31 PM PST by SeeSharp
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To: LS

Is what you are looking for inside of this?

“Moreover I do not believe the Government of the United States would find it in accordance with the principles which guide them, to confine the help which they have so generously promised to only such munitions of war and commodities as could be immediately paid for. You may be assured that we shall prove ourselves ready to suffer and sacrifice to the utmost for the Cause, and that we glory in being its champion. The rest we leave with confidence to you and to your people, being sure that ways and means will be found which future generations on both sides of the Atlantic will approve and admire.

If, as I believe, you are convinced, Mr. President, that the defeat of the Nazi and Fascist tyranny is a matter of high consequence to the people of the United States and to the Western Hemisphere, you will regard this letter not as an appeal for aid, but as a statement of the minimum action necessary to the achievement of our common purpose.”


12 posted on 12/21/2013 3:50:42 PM PST by ansel12 ( Ben Bradlee -- JFK told me that "he was all for people's solving their problems by abortion".)
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To: ansel12

Among the souvenirs etc. my Father sent home while he was in WWII was a single page telling them how to behave while in Great Britain. This was given to them the same day they landed in Liverpool.

One thing was not to show off your wealth as if something like $18 a month was a lot of wealth.

Also they were told not to complain about their coffee. “After all they think we can’t make a decent cup of tea.”


13 posted on 12/21/2013 3:57:33 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

BOOYA. Thank you. That is it!


14 posted on 12/21/2013 4:09:12 PM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

Somehow I missed your post, it is obviously it.


15 posted on 12/21/2013 4:15:58 PM PST by ansel12 ( Ben Bradlee -- JFK told me that "he was all for people's solving their problems by abortion".)
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To: Colonel_Flagg

Can you tell me the year/publisher and edition of “Their Finest Hour” that you have cited?


16 posted on 12/21/2013 4:30:46 PM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: LS

Cool. One of the greats,, thrust into the middle of human conflicts, it’s likely few others might ever survive as regally and as irreverently,, talk about enduring a life of wars, bourbon, bulldogs and duties par non,, half Brit half american.. He turned out a lot better than Obama, half american half uhhh ?? .. ;-]

Merry Christmas and a HaPPY Holiday!!


17 posted on 12/21/2013 4:47:58 PM PST by NormsRevenge (Semper Fi)
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To: loveliberty2; RoosterRedux

Why, thank you. It gave me a chance to get back into my Churchill library. I read his series “The Second World War” in junior high and high school and I’ve been looking for a reason to get back into it since. :)


18 posted on 12/21/2013 5:04:36 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
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To: LS

You are quite welcome. You have a good memory.


19 posted on 12/21/2013 5:05:20 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
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To: LS
Can you tell me the year/publisher and edition of “Their Finest Hour” that you have cited?

My version is the Houghton Mifflin / Cooperation Publishing version, 1949. I do not see an edition number in my copies.

20 posted on 12/21/2013 5:12:48 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
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To: yarddog
"Among the souvenirs etc. my Father sent home while he was in WWII was a single page telling them how to behave while in Great Britain. This was given to them the same day they landed in Liverpool."

From this?

"The little book that gave American GIs their first taste of England during WW II"

21 posted on 12/21/2013 5:48:31 PM PST by MV=PY (The Magic Question: Who's paying for it?)
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To: MV=PY

That is interesting. What I remember was a single page but the general spirit seems to be alike. Since it was given to all GIs I assume Daddy got one but I know he didn’t bring or send one home.


22 posted on 12/21/2013 5:57:04 PM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: LS
Sadly... the only Churchill speech I can recall is in an Iron Maiden song called Aces High.
23 posted on 12/21/2013 6:26:25 PM PST by Rodamala
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To: Colonel_Flagg

What bugs me is that I don’t have this book, and I know I didn’t read it here, so I still don’t know where I saw this the first time. But this works. Thanks!


24 posted on 12/22/2013 5:08:42 AM PST by LS ('Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually.' Hendrix)
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To: LS

You can still find Churchill’s “The Second World War” in most good book stores, and I’ve seen it in paperback. Six volumes and you do need some chops in the language to handle Churchillian English, but it’s an immensely rewarding read in the end. Glad I could help.


25 posted on 12/22/2013 6:18:26 AM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
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To: Colonel_Flagg
Your study paid off for LS here. America citizens need to take a look at these words of Churchill also:
"My friends, I must tell you that a Socialist policy is abhorrent to the British ideas of freedom. Although it is now put forward in the main by people who have a good grounding in the Liberalism and Radicalism of the early part of this century, there can be no doubt that Socialism is inseparably interwoven with Totalitarianism and the abject worship of the State. It is not alone that property, in all its forms, is struck at, but that liberty, in all its forms, is challenged by the fundamental conceptions of Socialism.

"Look how even to-day they hunger for controls of every kind, as if these were delectable foods instead of war-time inflictions and monstrosities. There is to be one State to which all are to be obedient in every act of their lives. This State is to be the arch-employer, the arch-planner, the arch-administrator and ruler, and the archcaucus boss.

" How is an ordinary citizen or subject of the King to stand up against this formidable machine, which, once it is in power, will prescribe for every one of them where they are to work; what they are to work at; where they may go and what they may say; what views they are to hold and within what limits they may express them; where their wives are to go to queue-up for the State ration; and what education their children are to receive to mould their views of human liberty and conduct in the future?

" A Socialist State once thoroughly completed in all its details and its aspects – and that is what I am speaking of – could not afford to suffer opposition. Here in old England, in Great Britain, of which old England forms no inconspicuous part, in this glorious Island, the cradle and citadel of free democracy throughout the world, we do not like to be regimented and ordered about and have every action of our lives prescribed for us. In fact we punish criminals by sending them to Wormwood Scrubs and Dartmoor, where they get full employment, and whatever board and lodging is appointed by the Home Secretary.

" Socialism is, in its essence, an attack not only upon British enterprise, but upon the right of the ordinary man or woman to breathe freely without having a harsh, clumsy, tyrannical hand clapped across their mouths and nostrils. A Free Parliament – look at that – a Free Parliament is odious to the Socialist doctrinaire. Have we not heard Mr. Herbert Morrison descant upon his plans to curtail Parliamentary procedure and pass laws simply by resolutions of broad principle in the House of Commons, afterwards to be left by Parliament to the executive and to the bureaucrats to elaborate and enforce by departmental regulations? As for Sir Stafford Cripps on “Parliament in the Socialist State,” I have not time to read you what he said, but perhaps it will meet the public eye during the election campaign.

" But I will go farther. I declare to you, from the bottom of my heart, that no Socialist system can be established without a political police. Many of those who are advocating Socialism or voting Socialist to-day will be horrified at this idea. That is because they are short-sighted, that is because they do not see where their theories are leading them.

" No Socialist Government conducting the entire life and industry of the country could afford to allow free, sharp, or violently-worded expressions of public discontent. They would have to fall back on some form of Gestapo, no doubt very humanely directed in the first instance. And this would nip opinion in the bud; it would stop criticism as it reared its head, and it would gather all the power to the supreme party and the party leaders, rising like stately pinnacles above their vast bureaucracies of Civil servants, no longer servants and no longer civil. And where would the ordinary simple folk – the common people, as they like to call them in America – where would they be, once this mighty organism had got them in its grip?

" I stand for the sovereign freedom of the individual within the laws which freely elected Parliaments have freely passed. I stand for the rights of the ordinary man to say what he thinks of the Government of the day, however powerful, and to turn them out, neck and crop, if he thinks he can better his temper or his home thereby, and if he can persuade enough others to vote with him.

" But, you will say, look at what has been done in the war. Have not many of those evils which you have depicted been the constant companions of our daily life? It is quite true that the horrors of war do not end with the fighting-line. They spread far away to the base and the homeland, and everywhere people give up their rights and liberties for the common cause. But this is because the life of their country is in mortal peril, or for the sake of the cause of freedom in some other land. They give them freely as a sacrifice. It is quite true that the conditions of Socialism play a great part in war-time. We all submit to being ordered about to save our country. But when the war is over and the imminent danger to our existence is removed, we cast off these shackles and burdens which we imposed upon ourselves in times of dire and mortal peril, and quit the gloomy caverns of war and march out into the breezy fields, where the sun is shining and where all may walk joyfully in its warm and golden rays."

Winston CHURCHILL, The First Conservative Election Broadcast, 4 June 1945. Quoted in CAPET, CHARLOT & HILL, p. 201-2


26 posted on 12/22/2013 12:51:45 PM PST by loveliberty2
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To: loveliberty2

Very powerful stuff. Thank you for the post. Churchill is often very rewarding!


27 posted on 12/22/2013 1:08:45 PM PST by Colonel_Flagg (Some people meet their heroes. I raised mine. Go Army.)
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