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Special Report: Lost hooves, dead cattle before Merck halted Zilmax sales
Reuters ^ | 30 Dec 2013 | By P.J. Huffstutter and Tom Polansek

Posted on 01/01/2014 5:56:02 PM PST by fella

(Reuters) - The U.S. beef industry's dependence on the muscle-building drug Zilmax began unraveling here, on a sweltering summer day, in the dusty cattle pens outside a Tyson Foods Inc slaughterhouse in southeastern Washington state.

As cattle trailers that had traveled up to four hours in 95-degree heat began to unload, 15 heifers and steers hobbled down the ramps on August 5, barely able to walk. The reason: The animals had lost their hooves, according to U.S. Department of Agriculture documents reviewed by Reuters. The documents show the 15 animals were destroyed.

The next day, the hottest day of the month, two more animals with missing hooves arrived by truck. Again, the animals were destroyed, the documents show.

(Excerpt) Read more at reuters.com ...


TOPICS: Agriculture
KEYWORDS: ailmax; animaltesting; beef; beefindustry; medicine; merck; pharmaceuticals; zilmax
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A long article but kind of makes me leery of fast food and what's being put in our food.
1 posted on 01/01/2014 5:56:02 PM PST by fella
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To: fella

They need to stop trying so hard to engineer better cows


2 posted on 01/01/2014 5:56:43 PM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
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To: fella

Makes my happy I have my own cattle at home.


3 posted on 01/01/2014 6:06:21 PM PST by Rio (Proud resident of the State of Jefferson)
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To: fella

Free range is the way to go. Cost more, but the health benefits and peace of mind are worth it.


4 posted on 01/01/2014 6:06:45 PM PST by gov_bean_ counter (Romans 1:22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools)
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To: fella

This is so f’ed up.


5 posted on 01/01/2014 6:16:36 PM PST by James C. Bennett (An Australian.)
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To: fella

We have grass fed cows here in Vermont. Better milk, and better meat.


6 posted on 01/01/2014 6:17:19 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: fella

That is folking pathetic


7 posted on 01/01/2014 6:22:09 PM PST by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: GeronL

We need more people raising buffalo.


8 posted on 01/01/2014 6:23:17 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: fella
As cattle trailers that had traveled up to four hours in 95-degree heat

But let's overlook the obvious and blame big pharma. This is why the FDA doesn't take the bleating of the food luddites seriously.

9 posted on 01/01/2014 6:23:40 PM PST by Valpal1 (If the police can t solve a problem with brute force, they ll find a way to fix it with brute force)
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To: fella

I will avoid Tyson!


10 posted on 01/01/2014 6:25:44 PM PST by minnesota_bound
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To: cripplecreek

I love Buffalo meat


11 posted on 01/01/2014 6:27:40 PM PST by al baby (Hi MomÂ… I was refereeing to Obama)
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To: Valpal1

Cattle don’t lose their hooves because they were in a hot trailer for a few hours.


12 posted on 01/01/2014 6:28:05 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: fella

The GMO and other food scientists swear up and down they know what they are doing.


13 posted on 01/01/2014 6:28:16 PM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Cicero
We have grass fed cows here in Vermont.

Got 'em in Colorado too.


14 posted on 01/01/2014 6:28:56 PM PST by Fightin Whitey
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To: Valpal1

95 degrees hasn’t happened before? I seem to remember much hotter summers and never heard of hooves falling off.


15 posted on 01/01/2014 6:29:01 PM PST by logic101.net (How many more children must die on the altar of "gun free zones"?)
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To: yldstrk

Why Beef Is Becoming More Like Chicken
Cheap, uniform, and bland.

A new cattle drug called Zilmax is being widely used in the industrial feedlots where most of America’s beef comes from, but not because it produces a better sirloin. In fact, it has been shown to make steak less flavorful and juicy than beef from untreated cattle. Many feedlot owners, big meatpackers, and at least one prominent industry group resisted the drug, worrying that the beef industry would turn off consumers if it started churning out lower-quality steaks.

So what accounts for the sudden popularity of Zilmax? Zilmax is a highly effective growth drug, and it makes cattle swell up with muscle in the final weeks of their lives. And despite concerns within the industry, the economics of modern beef production have made the rise of Zilmax all but inevitable.

The beef industry has been shrinking for decades, a problem that can be traced to cheap chicken. Poultry companies like Tyson Foods figured out in the 1930s and ’40s how to raise chickens in a factory-like system. Using a business model called vertical integration, poultry companies like Tyson began to control every aspect of animal production, from the hatchery to the farm and the slaughterhouse. After the dawn of vertical integration, chickens were raised in barn-like warehouses on the farm, killed and butchered along assembly lines nearby, and, later, shipped out to big customers like McDonald’s and Wal-Mart—with every step of the process dictated by the same company. In the 1990s, the same model was widely applied to pork production, cutting out the middlemen and leading to a drop in pork prices (after adjusting for inflation).

As chicken got cheaper, it took top billing on fast-food menus. Beef got pushed aside. Some companies have tried to vertically integrate cattle production, but it has never panned out economically, thanks to the stubborn biology of cows. Chicken and pigs have offspring in big numbers, which lends itself to industrial-sized barns. (Hens lay a steady supply of eggs that yield full-grown chickens in about two months; sows bear big litters of piglets that reach maturity in about six months.) But a cow can only have one calf at a time, and the gestation period lasts nine months. After that, a calf suckles from its mother for about four months. It would be exorbitantly expensive to confine that life cycle in a warehouse, since the cow and calf would have to be sheltered and fed for over a year, just to get one full-grown heifer out of the deal. As a result, the vast majority of calves are still born and reared on wide-open ranchland, where herds of them eat free grass and stick by their mother’s side.

But cattle producers still imitate the heavily industrialized chicken industry to compete. Zilmax is part of a new regime for raising cattle that emphasizes higher production and cost-cutting wherever possible. This regime is what created the modern-day feedlot, where thousands of cattle, after being raised on open ranchland, are corralled on muddy hillsides to spend the last few months of their life eating corn. It is also what necessitates the battery of pharmaceuticals and feed additives that cattle must consume to stay healthy and gain weight—as Michael Pollan and others have noted, cattle didn’t evolve to digest corn, so they easily become sick on feedlots without careful monitoring.

Even with these advancements, the cattle business is still divided in half: On one side are independent ranches and feedlots that raise cattle; on the other side are big meatpackers that buy cattle from feedlots, slaughter them, and sell the beef. The relationship between cattlemen and meatpackers veers between amiable and adversarial. Neither can succeed without the other, but both are desperate to increase profits.

Enter Zilmax. Originally developed to treat asthma in humans, it was later found to be a “repartitioning agent” in cattle, changing the animals’ metabolism so they produce more muscle instead of fat. While this can boost the amount of meat per carcass, it can remove the very qualities that people like about beef, like the fatty marbling that adds juiciness and flavor. In 2006, Intervet Inc., the company that originally made Zilmax, won approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to use it in the food supply, even after noting in its application to the FDA that “overall tenderness, juiciness, flavor intensity and beef flavor were all statistically different [in Zilmax-treated beef] compared to controls.” (Intervet’s application also said consumers probably wouldn’t notice the lesser quality.) The drug was launched commercially in the United States in 2007 and is now sold by Merck Animal Health.

At first, meatpackers greeted Zilmax with skepticism. Early research showing the harmful effects on beef quality scared off many feedlot owners who would have purchased it. By the late summer of 2011 only two of the major meatpackers, Tyson Foods Inc. and JBS SA, accepted cattle treated with Zilmax, according to feedlot managers and the companies. Cargill, which was concerned about quality, didn’t accept Zilmax-treated cattle until 2012. National Beef Packing Co. refused to comment on its Zilmax practices for this article, but according to feedlot managers, that company also began accepting Zilmax-treated animals last year. Those four major meatpackers control roughly 85 percent of the market, so when they decide to accept a new practice, as they now have with Zilmax, its implementation is swift across the entire beef supply.

As Zilmax gains popularity, it is creating a kind of positive feedback loop. As more feedlots use it and more meatpackers accept it, more of their competitors feel pressured to do the same just to keep up, even if they have concerns about Zilmax’s effects.


16 posted on 01/01/2014 6:29:30 PM PST by chicagolady (Mexican Elite say: EXPORT Poverty and Let the the Stupid AmericanTaxpayer foot the bill !)
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To: al baby

Bison is better than beef...


17 posted on 01/01/2014 6:29:34 PM PST by gov_bean_ counter (Romans 1:22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools)
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To: driftdiver

I’m sure they do, they just don’t give a damn...


18 posted on 01/01/2014 6:30:50 PM PST by gov_bean_ counter (Romans 1:22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools)
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To: cripplecreek

If you read the article they are trying to say the drug didnt cause this.


19 posted on 01/01/2014 6:30:53 PM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: chicagolady

I paid 20 bucks a pound for Christmas beef tenderloin.......


20 posted on 01/01/2014 6:31:08 PM PST by yldstrk (My heroes have always been cowboys)
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To: GeronL

It’s not really engineering, it is just a drug that was supposed to make them grow bigger muscles.


21 posted on 01/01/2014 6:33:16 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (From time to time the.tree of liberty must be watered with the blood of tyrants and patriots.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants

but those would be marbled too, right?


22 posted on 01/01/2014 6:36:18 PM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
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To: GeronL

No, according to the article, it makes less fat and the meat doesn’t taste as good.


23 posted on 01/01/2014 6:45:04 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (From time to time the.tree of liberty must be watered with the blood of tyrants and patriots.)
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To: Blood of Tyrants

bad Zilmax bad!


24 posted on 01/01/2014 6:47:18 PM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
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To: fella

just like tyson chicken…. i don’t eat that either


25 posted on 01/01/2014 6:51:07 PM PST by Nifster
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To: Blood of Tyrants

Bigger/stronger muscles? My husband raises rodeo bulls, this might be something that might work for him.


26 posted on 01/01/2014 6:53:23 PM PST by Ditter
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To: fella

ping


27 posted on 01/01/2014 6:53:31 PM PST by Java4Jay (The evils of government are directly proportional to the tolerance of the people.)
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To: cripplecreek

They might if they already had foot rot or laminitis. The excessive heat and poor circulation could increase bacterial breakdown of the foot tissues resulting the hooves being shed.

Why should we assume only healthy animals were shipped? Anyone transporting cattle in the heat of the day in August is already morally suspect.


28 posted on 01/01/2014 6:54:49 PM PST by Valpal1 (If the police can t solve a problem with brute force, they ll find a way to fix it with brute force)
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To: Valpal1

So they don’t ship cattle during the summer?

LOL


29 posted on 01/01/2014 7:00:06 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: fella

Such cruelty. PLUS, we’re eating poisoned meat. How long until human feet start falling off?

We don’t buy beef any more except from cattle grown in my daughter’s neighborhood. Happy cattle who’ve had a good life, that she’s talked to while walking past with her dog. We have great respect for lives of animals.


30 posted on 01/01/2014 7:02:40 PM PST by Veto! (Opinions freely dispensed as advice)
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To: gov_bean_ counter

I buy chicken and meat only at Whole Foods...yeah, a little pricier, but it tastes like food, not chemicals. Once you have their chikcen and then taste regular store chicken..you will really, really notice the difference.

It also helps me with weight cause I don’t eat as much meat. ha.

I also approve of their CEO, who tells it like it is about capitalism and had Lib demonstrators once. ha.


31 posted on 01/01/2014 7:04:21 PM PST by Recovering Ex-hippie
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To: Recovering Ex-hippie
Don't have a Whole Foods in Huntsville, AL. Earth Fare does a good job and yes you can tell the difference.

Weight improvement may be the by product of reduced gluten.

32 posted on 01/01/2014 7:10:19 PM PST by gov_bean_ counter (Romans 1:22 Professing themselves to be wise, they became fools)
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To: cripplecreek

Farmers that care set their alarm for 4 am and start the trip before sunrise and get’r done before breakfast.

It’s beyond stupid to do it in 95 degree heat.


33 posted on 01/01/2014 7:13:11 PM PST by Valpal1 (If the police can t solve a problem with brute force, they ll find a way to fix it with brute force)
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To: Ditter

Merk has already halted sales because of the side effects.


34 posted on 01/01/2014 7:20:18 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (From time to time the.tree of liberty must be watered with the blood of tyrants and patriots.)
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To: fella

They’re just not timing it right. You give them the chemicals, then you watch them very carefully while they expand, and just before they explode, you quickly slaughter them.

I don’t think they read the instructions.


35 posted on 01/01/2014 7:21:48 PM PST by Born to Conserve
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To: fella

Watch the documentary King Corn (you can watch it on Youtube). Interesting take on the effect of corn on EVERYTHING, including cattle. They aren’t meant to eat it... amazing what it’s doing to them and us.

Plus, I miss can sugar pop — HFCS just doesn’t sweeten the same way.

And let’s not even get started on corn based ethanol...


36 posted on 01/01/2014 7:33:46 PM PST by mn-bush-man
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To: fella
This and that article on chicken coming in from China that I read yesterday are pretty scary.

At the end of August, the Obama administration quietly decided to start allowing Chinese poultry processors to ship processed chicken into the United States.

Tilapia and cod are raised in ponds and dosed with antibiotics and growth hormones. Imported Chinese apple juice reportedly contains three times the federal limit for arsenic in water. U.S. inspectors have also found tainted mushrooms and garlic.

The European Union reported that China shipped potatoes infested with insects, ginger laced with salmonella, pumpkin seeds containing glass chips and frozen calamari contaminated by arsenic to Europe last year.

USDA officials halted imports of Chinese shrimp, eel, catfish and carp in 2007 because of high levels of illegal antibiotics and chemicals. Three years later, officials seized thousands of pounds of Chinese honey after finding illegal antibiotics. And this year, more than 500 dogs and a handful of cats died after eating jerky treats made of chicken, according to an investigation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

There's also that tainted dog food and baby formula...

37 posted on 01/01/2014 7:37:06 PM PST by Bon of Babble (Don't want to brag...but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school!!)
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To: Bon of Babble
Forgot the link:

http://theeconomiccollapseblog.com/archives/now-that-obama-is-allowing-chicken-from-china-what-will-that-do-to-the-chicken-industry

38 posted on 01/01/2014 7:37:46 PM PST by Bon of Babble (Don't want to brag...but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school!!)
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To: mn-bush-man

Back in my youth when I worked on a dairy farm the farmer said he wouldn’t eat store bought beef because of all the crap in it even though it was cheaper than raising a few steers of his own.

He kept 4 or 5 steers and rotated them around on the family garden plots because they had several houses on the farm.


39 posted on 01/01/2014 7:41:09 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Bon of Babble

I make my own doggie treats these days. They love baby carrots. I dry apples and sweet potatoes for them as well as turkey.


40 posted on 01/01/2014 7:44:01 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Nifster
just like tyson chicken…. i don’t eat that either

great, it leaves so much more quality meat for the rest of us....good luck with your free range stuff (whatever that means)

41 posted on 01/01/2014 7:59:20 PM PST by terycarl
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To: cripplecreek

My sister lost her beloved “Keystone” a few years ago, fed only expensive, upscale dog food. Kidneys went and he was a young, healthy dog. Vet said it was almost certainly tainted dog food from China and he’d seen it before. She cried her eyes out.

I fed my shih-tzu the jerky dog treats that ended up being on the “tainted” list but I, and my dog were lucky.

I too make my own dog food now — haven’t made the treats you describe, neither of my dogs will eat anything with sweet potato, apples or blueberries, unfortunately, only meet and greens. They are surely spoiled dogs but they protect our home and us and have brought us years of love and joy.


42 posted on 01/01/2014 7:59:54 PM PST by Bon of Babble (Don't want to brag...but I can still fit into the earrings I wore in high school!!)
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To: mn-bush-man
Try Dublin Bottling Works. If your not here in central Texas you can get it mail order. They used to make the famous Dublin Dr. Pepper the only DP made with cane sugar to the old recipe. Then DP cut their throats and forced them out by demanding that they use Dp's new recipe, so they started their own soda lines. I used to be a big DP fan but refuse it now.
43 posted on 01/01/2014 8:11:23 PM PST by fella ("As it was before Noah so shall it be again,")
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To: fella

And this is before pink slime is added . . .


44 posted on 01/01/2014 8:17:28 PM PST by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: fella

We need to ban all pharmaceuticals.

This sorcerer’s apprentice boondoggles have to be stopped.


45 posted on 01/01/2014 8:17:29 PM PST by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: GeronL

God got it wrong, but Big Pharma will fix it.


46 posted on 01/01/2014 8:18:15 PM PST by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: Valpal1

Cattle normally live in 110+ degree heat and do just fine.

Heat cannot make cattle’s hooves fall off, trust me.


47 posted on 01/01/2014 8:20:59 PM PST by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: editor-surveyor
But it can exacerbate already present and in progress diseases that result in hoof sloughing.

Oh look, here's a PDF on a common problem in the area.

http://oregonstate.edu/dept/eoarc/sites/default/files/abouthome/scientists/documents/DWB29.pdf

Severe symptoms can result in sloughing of hooves and tails. These clinical signs, though more apparent during hot weather, can occur at any time of the year.

48 posted on 01/01/2014 8:25:54 PM PST by Valpal1 (If the police can t solve a problem with brute force, they ll find a way to fix it with brute force)
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To: cripplecreek

>> “We need more people raising buffalo.” <<

.
That’ll keep ex-Lax in business!

Buffalo isn’t healthy to consume in great quantities, not enough fat.


49 posted on 01/01/2014 8:26:20 PM PST by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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To: Valpal1

The drugs are the cause of the disease.

The heat, if anything will help the cattle resist the damage.


50 posted on 01/01/2014 8:28:15 PM PST by editor-surveyor (Freepers: Not as smart as I'd hoped they'd be)
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