Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Health officials respond to beach radiation scare (Half Moon Bay, CA)
hmbreview.com ^ | January 3, 2014 | Mark Noack

Posted on 01/04/2014 3:32:31 PM PST by ransomnote

An amateur video of a Geiger counter showing what appear to be high radiation levels at a Coastside beach has drawn the attention of local, state and federal public health officials. Since being posted last week, the short video has galvanized public concerns that radioactive material could be landing on the local coastline after traveling from Japan as a result of the 2011 meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors.

Government officials say they are looking into the video shot on Dec. 23 and performing their own sampling of the beaches, but they have found no indication so far that radiation levels were hazardous.

“It’s not something that we feel is an immediate public health concern,” said Dean Peterson, county environmental health director. “We’re not even close to the point of saying that any of this is from Fukushima.”

First posted last week on YouTube, the seven-minute video shows the meter of a Geiger counter as an off-camera man measures different spots on the beach south of Pillar Point Harbor. The gadget’s alarm begins ringing as its radiation reading ratchets up to about 150 counts per minute, or roughly five times the typical amount found in the environment.

Counts per minute is a standard way for Geiger counters to measure radiation, but it does not directly equate to the strength or its hazard level to humans. Those factors depend on the type of radioactive particles and isotope.

Nonetheless, the video went viral online, gaining nearly 400,000 views in the last week.

In a blog entry, the unidentified poster of the video noted that he has been monitoring local beaches for two years before noticing a sudden rise in radiation levels in recent days. The Review was not immediately able to contact the man who made the video.

(Excerpt) Read more at hmbreview.com ...


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: fukushimaradiation; geigercounter; halfmoonbay; radiation; radiationreading
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-57 next last
More at the link.

Here's an excerpt. " Using a different unit, the county inspector measured the beach to have a radiation level of about 100 micro-REM per hour, or about five times the normal amount."

Note that the article states that the origin of the increased radiation is not yet known.

1 posted on 01/04/2014 3:32:31 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

Here we go again -— GLOBAL RADIATION


2 posted on 01/04/2014 3:34:59 PM PST by EagleUSA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EagleUSA

I’ll start to worry when you can hear the sharks calling “here surfer, surfer, surfer”.


3 posted on 01/04/2014 3:41:56 PM PST by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

Must have found an old Coleman lantern mantle


4 posted on 01/04/2014 3:43:07 PM PST by HangnJudge
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mastador1

Hey you could have been right, Lord knows I’ve witnessed some pretty bizarre behavior from so called parents.


5 posted on 01/04/2014 3:45:08 PM PST by Mastador1 (I'll take a bad dog over a good politician any day!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: EagleUSA

It appears that the link has been “cleaned up” - there is more info on the post than the link. I wonder why?


6 posted on 01/04/2014 3:45:59 PM PST by slimer (“I hope that someday we will be able to put away our fears and prejudices and just laugh at people.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

There is, obviously, a certain level of radiation everywhere on earth. While I do see that the Pacific currents flow straight east from Japan, it is beyond comprehension to think that radioactive water from Japan, mixing into the vast ocean, could be a health hazard on the US west coast. While I am much closer to Japan, I see no concern here. Maybe someone on here can explain.


7 posted on 01/04/2014 3:56:01 PM PST by AlexW
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

“He noted that many innocuous items could spike the radiation levels in an area, including red-painted disposable eating utensils.”

Suuuure, that’s what it is. All those millions of people with red painted disposable eating utensils - they should have known it would kill them.

Move on, nothing to see.


8 posted on 01/04/2014 3:57:34 PM PST by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AlexW
Maybe someone on here can explain.

Yes, I think I can explain. The vast majority of people and the media are completely ignorant about the hazards of radioactive material, chemicals, and nuclear power in general.

9 posted on 01/04/2014 4:03:38 PM PST by Fzob (Jesus + anything = nothing, Jesus + nothing = everything)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: AlexW

Back around 1958, there was found the bomber LADY BE GOOD in the Lybian desert, where it crash landed after a raid in WWII.

The people who found it saw the bomber still had lots of items left over from the war in it. They also found one of the RAREST ITEMS in the world there.
The canteens aboard were filled with WWII water and was NOT RADIOACTIVE as all water was after the nuke tests.

The discoverers made coffee with the water.


10 posted on 01/04/2014 4:15:02 PM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Sometimes you need 7+ more ammo. LOTS MORE.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

We pay government people to sit around watching Youtube videos?


11 posted on 01/04/2014 4:17:22 PM PST by Cementjungle
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ruy Dias de Bivar
They make high sensitivity whole body radiation counters out of pre-WWII battleship steel plating,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whole_body_counting

12 posted on 01/04/2014 4:25:14 PM PST by HangnJudge
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

The discoverers made coffee with the water.

Thus adding potassium-40 as it passes through the body


13 posted on 01/04/2014 4:29:25 PM PST by HangnJudge
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: 2Fro; all_mighty_dollar; Arkat Kingtroll; Battle Hymn of the Republic; Betis70; billycat95130; ...

>> PING <<
Click for San Jose, California Forecast
Send FReepmail if you want on/off SVP list
The List of Ping Lists

Surf's up.

14 posted on 01/04/2014 4:32:06 PM PST by martin_fierro (Half Life Bay)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

150 CPM isn’t worth getting yur knickers in a knot.

Here in Wa, west of the Cascades, BG rates are 25-65 CPM depending on if it’s Tuesday or if the moon is full.

But east, over by Spokane, it can be 80-100 CPM because of Hanford.

If it got up to 3 or 4 hundred CPM, I might think it wasn’t a great day to go swimming...


15 posted on 01/04/2014 4:37:12 PM PST by djf (Global warming is a bunch of hot air!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: slimer

Uhmmm...wow. There WAS more information other than this excerpt.


16 posted on 01/04/2014 4:40:18 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: EagleUSA

Well the December 2012 thing didn’t pan out nor did the Comet Ison thing pan out so we moved on to something different.


17 posted on 01/04/2014 4:41:14 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: slimer; justa-hairyape

I see they removed the text about officials also testing and finding 5x readings.........


18 posted on 01/04/2014 4:41:19 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

Has anyone contacted Dean Koontz and checked on his mutant monkeys???


19 posted on 01/04/2014 4:42:17 PM PST by Monkey Face (SMILE: You don't own all the problems in the world.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

From the comments section:

jcdenver posted at 9:45 am on Sat, Jan 4, 2014.
“Article: “Although the radiation levels were clearly higher than is typical, Peterson emphasized that it was still not unsafe for humans. A person would need to be exposed to 100 microREMs of radiation for 50,000 hours before it surpassed safety guidelines by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, he explained.”
I’m no math wiz, but the OSHA guidelines seem to say 1 REM limit for radiation workers - isn’t 100 microREMS times 50,000 hours work out to 5 REMS?
Also, EPA says annual dose shouldn’t exceed 100 milliREMS. At 100 microREMS per hour, that would take 1000 hours or just over 42 and a half days...”

And following link to link to link to find the original report: http://www.enviroreporter.com/investigations/fukushima/radiation-station-pacifica-california/


20 posted on 01/04/2014 4:47:55 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

I grew up going to HMB...
Not the first time those folks glow in the dark....


21 posted on 01/04/2014 4:51:49 PM PST by matginzac
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf
But east, over by Spokane, it can be 80-100 CPM because of Hanford.

Spokane has huge amounts of naturally-occurring radon. One of the hot spots of the world.

"Living in Spokane exposes residents to about five times the natural background radiation as here [Seattle] because of higher levels of radon in the Spokane area."

22 posted on 01/04/2014 4:55:48 PM PST by steve86 (Some things aren't really true but you wouldn't be half surprised if they were.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: steve86

Thanks. Knew about Hanford, didn’t know about the radon!


23 posted on 01/04/2014 5:13:22 PM PST by djf (Global warming is a bunch of hot air!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: EagleUSA
Here we go again -— GLOBAL RADIATION

No, Japanese radiation.

71 sailors from the USS Ronald Reagan reported severe radiation sickness while on duty helping out at Fukushima, and the ocean current come from Japan directly to the West Coast.

In other words, it's a valid issue. You can argue that the amount is still low, but even then you'd have to show some evidence. But you can't deny the existence of the problem or the potential threat.

24 posted on 01/04/2014 5:18:50 PM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Talisker

“71 sailors from the USS Ronald Reagan reported severe radiation sickness while on duty helping out at Fukushima,”
__________________________________________________
Well, duhhh...”on duty helping out at Fukushima”. What else would one expect?
That has nothing to do with the west coast of the US.


25 posted on 01/04/2014 5:35:31 PM PST by AlexW
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Talisker

“.. But you can’t deny the existence of the problem or the potential threat.”

::::::::::::

That was not the purpose of my original post. Yes, it is an issue that may or may not be a true scientific-based problem. I posted because you can be sure that another “Algore” will try and run scams on it...real or not. It is just how the criminal left works.


26 posted on 01/04/2014 5:40:08 PM PST by EagleUSA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: AlexW
Well, duhhh...”on duty helping out at Fukushima”. What else would one expect? That has nothing to do with the west coast of the US.

And you know that how? Because you have to be on a ship next to Fukushima? Too bad you weren't there to tell the Navy captain "what else would one expect." You could have protected 71 lives.

Or maybe because there's no way for radiation to cross the ocean? Because radiation cannot be carried in seawater? Because there are no ocean currents from Japan to the West Coast? Because there is simply not enough radiation at Fukushima to be dangerous?

Well, duhhh...

27 posted on 01/04/2014 5:42:04 PM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: EagleUSA
...you can be sure that another “Algore” will try and run scams on it...real or not. It is just how the criminal left works.

Very true. Which makes it hard to know, in the case of actual danger, how much danger there really is, versus how much the Rats want everyone to think there is. Thatnks for clarifying.

28 posted on 01/04/2014 5:43:41 PM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Talisker

“Or maybe because there’s no way for radiation to cross the ocean?”
_______________________________________________
Of course it can, but what is the level by the time it reaches America?
US navy sailors helping out AT Fukashima is a non sequitor, and has nothing to do with the subject.
You act as if their are giant logs of enriched uranium floating towards California beaches. Glow in the dark beach bunnies...hey, that might be trendy.


29 posted on 01/04/2014 5:53:55 PM PST by AlexW
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: HangnJudge
Next to kicking the hell out of Beatty's battlecruisers and avoiding annihilation at Jutland, radiation measuring equipment is the WWI German High Seas Fleet's biggest claim to fame.

The high command scuttling all that steel at Scapa Flow post-war turned out to be a bonanza for that particular industry.

30 posted on 01/04/2014 5:54:12 PM PST by skeeter
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: EagleUSA

This one is not a hoax.


31 posted on 01/04/2014 5:56:22 PM PST by bmwcyle (People who do not study history are destine to believe really ignorant statements.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Fzob
The vast majority of people and the media are completely ignorant about the hazards of radioactive material, chemicals, and nuclear power in general.

Agreed. Case in point. I came across the following story in the comments below one of the CVN-76 "Radiation Poisoning" news stories here:

From what I understand, radiation is airborn and it is floating across North America, Canada and Mexico. I don't know the degree of radiation I had but I can tell you it was a slow affliction, I thought I had a brain tumor. As I walked, I began to feel like I was listing to the right, I could not judge stepping over something. I would think I had raised my foot high enough when actually I had not raised it at all. I was becoming increasingly tired. It was awful. I had a pain behind my right ear that came and went. I could not sleep. I went to the Nutrition Wellness Center in Sarasota, FL. Dr. James Martin diagnosed me and I went for treatments under a tens like machine but it is 10 times or more powerful. It took many treatments to clear the beta and gamma and longer to treat the alpha. Some how between October 2013 and November 2013 I picked up Gamma again. Perhps because it is in the air, water, food, people are getting it.I believe people have it and are unaware they have it. What is your take on this? BTW, thank you for your interest. ;-)

The woman explains that she got the "radiation" during a visit to San Francisco in 2012. Fortunately, she found a cure that fit her illness--A chiroquacker in Florida with a special machine to remove the radiation.

Yeah, it's a funny story and most anyone with any knowledge of radiation biology will recognize that it was all in her head. (One of the comment responders initially tried to tell her this, but then seemed to recognize that she was better off believing in her cure.) But the point is, she is sincere, and her symptoms were very real to her.

I wouldn't be surprised to find that a number of CVN-76 sailors' peculiar reported symptoms (fatigue, bronchitis, skin bumps, vaginal bleeding, etc.) were likewise psychosomatic, or at least misattributed to their perceived exposure. None of those involved in the lawsuit are nukes (who know better). Note that I'm not suggesting the cancer cases aren't real, but rather that they were not radiation induced (which require a much longer latency period)

Of course, some plaintiffs are likely just playing the lawsuit lottery

32 posted on 01/04/2014 6:15:02 PM PST by aLurker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

The Pacific Ocean is a gigantic washing machine.

Wouldn’t matter.


33 posted on 01/04/2014 6:34:22 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

A Kalifornia beach...hey, their Gov and Legislature exposes them to more deady forces than this radiation...and they voted for it!


34 posted on 01/04/2014 6:57:18 PM PST by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

Nothing like amateurs and idiots with specialized equipment they know NOTHING about creating false panic and rumors.

NOTHING and I MEAN NOTHING generates as much misinformation, lies, lunacy and unfounded panic as the
subject of radiation.

Mankind DID NOT CREATE RADIATION. We did not “make” radioactive materials. ALL mankind did was to take naturally occurring elements that have been present of
planet earth since time immemorial and concentrate them
from their normal very diluted state to a highly concentrated one. There is no such thing as “pre WWII
radiation free material”. Virtually every material found on planet earth is or was part of the decay chain of some isotope at some time. 99.9% of any and all comments that
appear in the news or on internet forums is posted by some
nimrod who couldn’t list the decay chain of an isotope if
their life depended on it....i.e. they are grossly ignorant.


35 posted on 01/04/2014 6:57:27 PM PST by nvscanman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nvscanman

I am thinking you fit the description of “grossly ignorant,” but that’s just my opinion so you’ll ignore it with ease.

Did you notice your post contains...how shall I say this...irrelevant information?

We’ve got your lecture boldly titled “MANKIND DID NOT CREATE RADIATION.” Yawn...uhm...you’ll note that your soliloquy is not related to the article or posts on the article. Straw man and all that.

You say the person is a “nimrod” and with your usual attention to detail, do no more than engage in ad hominem attacks when in fact this person knew the relavance of taking measurements over time.

THere’s the red herring approach where you sneer that this person wouldn’t recognize a decay chain but honestly, medical research proving the hazardous of radiation typically evalualtes exposure and effect and can safely ignore decay chain.

Really your posts are just tired knee jerk swings at “non-professionals.” Well let me point out that our “professionals” in the nuclear power industry are amoral and self interested so the public is on it’s own when addressing the radioactive waste those nuclear power plants keep spewing. Note also that I have had several debates with nuclear engineers or other nuke experts in which they throw dosimetry calculations at me as if that will make me bow down to their expertise and then I have to explain to them that their equations are irrelevant to human health, contradicted by medical science, and...uhmmm...quite obviously useless and then ask why they never noticed that the equations they stake their reputations on (expertise) are useuless? I mean you’d think if a nuclear engineer uses their dosiemtry calculations to “prove” that we should be more concerned about plutonium than bananas, the nuke “EXPERT” would think to himself/herself “Hey wait a minute...that can’t be right.” But nooooooo
Ok I think it’s time for you to go back to sneering about the supposed (but sadly lacking) professionalism of nuke experts. You’ll probably want to accuse anyone using a geiger counter as a leftie or tree hugger...Hey I’m just trying to help you smush together more of your trash observations.


36 posted on 01/04/2014 7:38:53 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: aLurker

So you post a freak story of an irrational woman and feel that you have nicely disposed of all legitimate concern regarding the topic of this thread? Uhmmmm...No. Your “story” about the deluded woman is irrelevant unless you are trying to insist that most people, except people who already agree with you, are equally deluded.

“I wouldn’t be surprised to find that a number of CVN-76 sailors’ peculiar reported symptoms (fatigue, bronchitis, skin bumps, vaginal bleeding, etc.) were likewise psychosomatic, or at least misattributed to their perceived exposure. None of those involved in the lawsuit are nukes (who know better). Note that I’m not suggesting the cancer cases aren’t real, but rather that they were not radiation induced (which require a much longer latency period)”

I don’t know what you are suggesting - it’s kind of a mess of deflection you got there. If you had any relevant evidence I’d care,but you just want to trash the “non-nuke’ types because you are so sure “nukes” are inherently superior, rational etc. Have you ever bothered to read the medical evidence about exposure because year after year, state of the art medical research proves over and over again that exposure to radiation harms human health. Now if sailors are harmed after exposure, you’re just certain it proves it’s psychosomatic. I am bored of your kind of character assassination “Sailors are lying or nukes are too smart for that...” blah blah blah, You post self-serving fact free nonsense but for some reason, you clearly feel the trash you post marks you as inherently superior. Well, go ahead and pleasure yourself by sneering at anyone who thinks it’s a legitimate topic to follow and read about.


37 posted on 01/04/2014 8:00:10 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

The dose equivalent rate you posted works out to about 870mrem per year. The annual average for a US citizen is 360mrem per year from background (and another 300mrem from man-made sources). Background radiation varies across the US, Denver Co citizens get about 600 mrem per year. Persons in some regions of India receive up to 1500 mrem per year.

A US radiation worker is allowed to receive up to 5000 mrem per year.


38 posted on 01/04/2014 8:30:01 PM PST by wfu_deacons
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: AlexW
giant logs of enriched uranium floating towards California beaches.

Darn! My neighborhood nuclear power program needs 'em!

39 posted on 01/04/2014 8:43:46 PM PST by no-s (when democracy is displaced by tyranny, the armed citizen still gets to vote)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: wfu_deacons

And the BEIR VII once again supports all prior medical research indicating that low doses of ionizing radiation do effect human health.
I think we should track this kind of information. If from Fukushima, that dose is going to increase because the 300+ tons of radioactive waste flowing into the ocean daily since the start of the disaster does not end...there is no projected ending. IF this dose is from Fukushima then it has to increase indefinitely with the amount of radiation dumped. THere is no known way to stop the flow of radiation from Fukushima into the air and water until there just isn’t any left at that location.

Denver? Are you referring to thinner atmosphere allowing more gamma? If so - not comparable with radioactive waste which is ingested or inhaled or absorbed through skin in fallout. Medically no comparison.

Interesting that 300mrem from man-made sources. Did you know that the nuke industries around the world have “agreed” to raise the level of “Background” radiation as needed so that above ground testing and unclaimed portions of Chernobyl can be counted as “background” because it happened BEFORE Fukushima? Radon is not comparable but pro nukers like to point to radon locations as “proof” of safety.
After Fukushima, safety limits for Japanese and US foodstuffs was arbitrarily increased.

Nuke workers aren’t protected from radiation damage by the mrem per year dose - but the oganizations that use the badge readings to limit nuke worker exposure ARE protected by lawsuits. Let me explain. For years the department of defense litigated against any worker suing for medical illnesses related to working with radiation by pointing to the tracking of the badge reading. Finally in 2000, Congress halted that practice by stating that it was clear rare forms of cancer and other radiation illnesses could occur and did occur in workers who stayed below that limit. Small exposure increases risk by a small amount. Exposure is cumulative. There aren’t “free” or safe threshold exposures - there are only legal claims that “We let him go when he reached the limit on his badge so why should we have to pay for his medical treatment.”


40 posted on 01/04/2014 9:08:18 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: AlexW

AlexW said:
“You act as if their are giant logs of enriched uranium floating towards California beaches. Glow in the dark beach bunnies...hey, that might be trendy.”

No. No one is acting as if there are “giant logs of enriched uranium floating towards California beaches.” You are the only one to write something remotely like that. You just made that up to falsely equate legitimate interest in reports of increased radiation on a beach which had been previously shown to be possible via computer modeling, with wild irrational fantasies. That’s standard for nuke pimps. They often post things like ‘were all gonna die!” to cloud the issue when in fact it’s only nuke pimps what write such trash.


41 posted on 01/04/2014 9:15:14 PM PST by ransomnote
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

I’m not going to get into a drawn out discussion about the risks of low level radiation exposure with you. I have two post-graduate degrees, one in health physics and one in radiation oncology physics. I have worked in the radiation field for 30 years. It is my belief that the Linear Non-Threshold models for radiation exposure over estimates the health risk.

I do find it interesting that you discount the radiation exposure in Denver because it is not inhaled or injested. In the next paragraph, you pooh-pooh radon exposure which is inhaled/ingested. Radon is an alpha emitter and thus the radiation biological equivalent dose per interaction is quite large as compared to a gamma interaction. Radon is thought to be the second leading cause of lung cancer in the US.


42 posted on 01/04/2014 9:37:10 PM PST by wfu_deacons
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

” reports of increased radiation on a beach which had been previously shown to be possible via computer modeling”
____________________________________
No, I was simply injecting a little humor into the subject.
Computer modeling? Well, you know the term GIGO.
Get back to me when the Geiger counters on west coast beaches
start pegging out. In the meantime, watch out for those glow in the dark beach babes ;)


43 posted on 01/04/2014 10:47:56 PM PST by AlexW
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote

I have degrees in natural science and radiologic technology and have worked with radiation for more than 3 decades. Unless you can trump that I AM the expert.


44 posted on 01/05/2014 12:24:46 AM PST by nvscanman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 36 | View Replies]

To: AlexW
Of course it can, but what is the level by the time it reaches America? US navy sailors helping out AT Fukashima is a non sequitor, and has nothing to do with the subject. You act as if their are giant logs of enriched uranium floating towards California beaches. Glow in the dark beach bunnies...hey, that might be trendy.

Do you think that the Captain of the ship would have put those sailors in harm's way on purpose? The radiation dosage they received certainly was NOT planned or expected, or those men NEVER would have ben exposed to it! That means the amount of radiation at Fukushima was not admitted by the Japanese - and that makes it extremely relevent, especially in trying to determine the amount that could reach America.

As for the rest, you are the one play-acting here. And you're doing it to minimize the extremely alarming and highly significant severe radiation poisoning of those sailors, which under no possible means was "expected."

45 posted on 01/05/2014 12:43:24 AM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Talisker

“Do you think that the Captain of the ship would have put those sailors in harm’s way on purpose? “
________________________________________________
You are comparing apples to oranges. Do you not understand the difference between a ship just offshore of Fukashima and
the American west coast, 6000 miles away? The water is not going to be radioactive, and chunks of radioactive debris are not going to be washing up on the US west coast shores.


46 posted on 01/05/2014 1:01:00 AM PST by AlexW
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]

To: AlexW
You are comparing apples to oranges. Do you not understand the difference between a ship just offshore of Fukashima and the American west coast, 6000 miles away? The water is not going to be radioactive, and chunks of radioactive debris are not going to be washing up on the US west coast shores.

This paper models the dispersion of radioactive material from Fukushima over time (watch the included video): Model simulations on the long-term dispersal of 137Cs released into the Pacific Ocean off Fukushima

I'm right about the fact that the injuries to the sailors was not expected, and that the Japanese lied about the severity of the radioactivity at Fukushima.

As exemplified by (but not limited to) the above paper, I'm right about the travel of radioactive materials across the Pacific to the West Coast from Fukushima.

What's left? The amount of radioactivity and it's effects? Fine - I never argued that. Obviously the ocean would dilute it. But what level is safe, under what conditions? With the Japanese government lying to the US Navy, does the US even know how radioactive the place is? And if it found out, do you really think it would tell us?

As well, what are the concentrations of radioactivity spreading across the Pacific that will affect sea life? Fish, and especially plankton? How sensitive are they? What percentages will die, and how will that effect the ecosystems that rely on them - and how will that affect the fishing industries for the entire Pacific Rim? Maybe the fish will be radioactive, from certain concentration areas. But maybe they'll just die - along with the plankton. Do you not understand why this is a gigantic deal?

I really don't understand your point. Multiple nuclear reactors have melted down to the bedrock and are dumping hundreds of tons of highly radioactive water into the Pacific ocean. Here's the bottom line: that's bad.

Okay?

47 posted on 01/05/2014 2:18:14 AM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Talisker

“Okay?”
_______________________________________
OK, but as Albert Goreon says...You are gonna first die from Gorebal warming. What is going to be first? I seriously doubt that Fukashima radioactive water is going to have any effect on the US west coast, but I am not a nukier engineer like our boy, Jimmah. Good luck, and buy your radiation suit and gear before the apocalypse, or move inland. Oh yea, be sure that you do not go in the water.


48 posted on 01/05/2014 2:48:37 AM PST by AlexW
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: AlexW

You cartoon mockery is noted. What, if anything else, you’ve added to this discussion is hard to see.


49 posted on 01/05/2014 11:09:02 AM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 48 | View Replies]

To: ransomnote
Your “story” about the deluded woman is irrelevant

An example of Fukushima-related psychosomatic radiation sickness is very relevant. It demonstrates irrational human behavior and the ignorance-driven, conspiracy mindset ("Things are much worse than they're telling us!")

Radiation scares us, with good reason. We can't see or feel it, but we know it can make us sick, give us cancer, and even kill us outright. Since that is all most people know about it, upon learning that they may have been exposed to any higher than normal levels of radiation, however low, it is not uncommon for them to begin to manifest symptoms. (See a discussion of the psychological aspects of such an incident here). As stories and rumors of radiation sickness spread, more attribute any symptoms to radiation to which they must have been unknowingly exposed.

Sailors are lying or nukes are too smart for that...”

You seem to be letting some kind of personal issue you have with Navy nukes affect your reasoning ability, so I'll clarify my point. Radiation ionizes indiscriminately, affecting nuke and non-nuke sailors equally. If sailors were exposed to doses sufficient to produce acute radiation sickness, nukes would have been similarly affected. If however, the alleged "radiation poisoning" was caused by "4500 people freaking out" (to quote the Radiation Officer), it makes sense that the nukes would know better than to worry about radiation sickness from a few mrem (or a few thousand, for that matter).

Can you explain why the nukes were not affected? Did they dodge the zoomies? Are they immune? Or are they part of the conspiracy (sworn to secrecy--even to death?) /sarc

50 posted on 01/05/2014 12:21:29 PM PST by aLurker
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-57 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson