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Political gridlock shouldn’t be solved with monarchy
American Legislator ^ | 1-14-14 | Will Freeland

Posted on 01/14/2014 1:37:25 PM PST by ThethoughtsofGreg

With the endless gridlock of modern Washington, it’s tempting to want to ditch the whole American constitutional system and install a king, who could at least get things done. This is essentially what David Brooks is proposing in his column this month, though he doesn’t quite come out and say it. Brooks is right that gridlock is stifling desperately needed policy innovation and reform, but is wrong about the cause and solution for it.

The problem is too much power and authority is centralized in the federal government. The solution is to look to the states, which are already a hotbed of policy innovation and reform. What America’s politics needs is a federal government that tends to those issues uniquely suited to the federal government and delegates all other authority to the states, shattering gridlock and ushering in a political process that more rapidly advances sound public policy.

The architects of the American system anticipated the lobbyists and “ideological enforcers” Brooks bemoans — they called them “factions” — and devised a system to account for them. What the founding fathers did not appear to properly anticipate was the rise of a federal government with seemingly boundless scope in policymaking discretion.

(Excerpt) Read more at americanlegislator.org ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; History
KEYWORDS: federalism; government; liberals; nyt

1 posted on 01/14/2014 1:37:25 PM PST by ThethoughtsofGreg
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To: ThethoughtsofGreg

It appears no one knows there is a Parliament.


2 posted on 01/14/2014 1:38:03 PM PST by Sacajaweau
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There wasn’t gridlock when the Democrats forced Socialism down our throats a few years ago.

Monarch? The Country would be better served by a civil war I fear.


3 posted on 01/14/2014 1:40:49 PM PST by Gene Eric (Don't be a statist!)
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To: ThethoughtsofGreg

Hmm...well, not all kings are necessarily bad. Charles I of England and Louis XVI of France turned out to be wonderful fellows. Afterward.


4 posted on 01/14/2014 1:44:10 PM PST by Billthedrill
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To: Billthedrill

Catherine of Russia


5 posted on 01/14/2014 2:06:00 PM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: ThethoughtsofGreg

6 posted on 01/14/2014 2:08:16 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: ThethoughtsofGreg
A dozen times or so, the author refers to the consolidated government as "federal." It hasn't federal for a hundred years. He also thinks it should delegate non-national problems to the states. He has it backwards, as if the sovereign is the government in Washington.

He states, Federalism is the proper tool to break the gridlock that ails America’s politics. That is true, but according to him, we have a federal government already, so I suppose those in power are going to reverse their evil ways and return power to the states. Huh?

That was one p!ss-poor article.

7 posted on 01/14/2014 2:09:12 PM PST by Jacquerie (Article V.)
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To: ThethoughtsofGreg

it’s tempting to want to ditch the whole American constitutional system and install a king, who could at least get things done

Um, no it's not.

8 posted on 01/14/2014 2:11:39 PM PST by katnip (Why Do Democrats Hate Babies?)
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To: ThethoughtsofGreg

Shouldn’t be but so often is, thru-out history. When the legislature can’t or (correctly) won’t move forward on unlawful new emergency changes, the executive power is often encouraged or allowed to act unilaterally, _for_the_people_. USConstitution tries to specifically prevent this type of usurpation, but the DC gang, in both US Congress and SCOTUS won’t, cause their in on the gig. Soon, like in Rome, Caesar will disband USCongress, since it is not doing what the puppetmasters want.


9 posted on 01/14/2014 2:20:39 PM PST by veracious
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To: Jacquerie

dittos.

And much of the gridlock is a result of the fact that the majority in Congress reject the notion that “50 states experimenting to find the best public policy environment leaves the federal government to focus on its core responsibilities”.


10 posted on 01/14/2014 4:24:52 PM PST by campaignPete R-CT (Let the dead bury the dead. Let the GOP bury the GOP.)
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To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

Gridlock isn’t a problem to be solved in the first place. Gridlock is the occasional consequence of our Constitutional separation of powers. People who don’t like that are enemies of the Constitution.


11 posted on 01/14/2014 6:32:11 PM PST by SunkenCiv (http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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