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Remember the Raisin
Monroe Evening News ^ | 1/19/2014 | kim brent

Posted on 01/19/2014 3:08:37 PM PST by madison10

Forces march to take their positions Saturday during the annual re-enactment on the 201st anniversary of the Battles of the River Raisin on the battlefield adjacent to the Monroe Multi-Sports Complex.

Read more at: http://www.monroenews.com/news/2014/jan/19/gallery-remember-raisin/


TOPICS: History; Local News; Military/Veterans
KEYWORDS: kentucky; lakeerie; massacre; michigan; ohio; raisinriver; warof1812

1 posted on 01/19/2014 3:08:38 PM PST by madison10
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To: cripplecreek

ping


2 posted on 01/19/2014 3:09:07 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy

I’d love to check it out but they need to reenact it in June.


3 posted on 01/19/2014 3:10:19 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: Springman; cyclotic; netmilsmom; RatsDawg; PGalt; FreedomHammer; queenkathy; madison10; ...
Michigan History of obvious interest to me. A northern version of the Alamo.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Michigan legislative action thread
4 posted on 01/19/2014 3:13:23 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek
When I went to school in Ann Arbor (ok, spare me the jibes), I placed a visit to this location near the top of my list. None of my friends were interested (grumble), so I went by myself. I show up, and the place is deserted, so I knock on the door of the "vistors' center" (if you can call it that) and a very nice man gave me a private tour. I asked him if I could walk around outside for a while, and he said, "sure."

My recollection is that it seemed to be a very odd place to have a fight . . . the terrain was very unremarkable. Without looking up the history (and which I do not remember), it struck me that both sides met "in transit."

5 posted on 01/19/2014 3:16:36 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: madison10
General George Custer hosting a reunion for Kentucky miltiamen who fought in the battle of Frenchtown (River Raisin.


6 posted on 01/19/2014 3:18:22 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: 1rudeboy

It was actually two battles. The Americans won the first one and didn’t wait for reinforcements making the disastrous decision to attack again.

Its called the River Raisin because of the wild grape vines that cover this whole area. I can’t imagine what it would have been like trying to get around in this area before roads.


7 posted on 01/19/2014 3:22:48 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

That being said Fort Meigs (where I believe the remaining troops fled—please don’t quiz me on the history), is well worth a visit if one is near Toledo/Maumee, Ohio.


8 posted on 01/19/2014 3:23:15 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy
It "should" look like more now. The location has become a National Park (which was of course closed during what's-his-face's temper tantrum)

River Raisin Battlefield

Lived in this county 99% of my life, but IMHO General George Armstrong Custer was a preening jerk.

9 posted on 01/19/2014 3:26:06 PM PST by madison10 ( Taking a husband shopping is akin to hunting with the game warden.)
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To: madison10

I don’t know who keeps the Kentucky pinglist but something like 9 KY counties are named for men who died here.


10 posted on 01/19/2014 3:26:27 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

General George Custer’s brother was a Civil war Hero with two medals of Honor awarded to him.

I don’t think that George Custer became a General until after his death.


11 posted on 01/19/2014 3:30:15 PM PST by mountainlion (Live well for those that did not make it back.)
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To: cripplecreek



12 posted on 01/19/2014 3:34:07 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: 1rudeboy

Fort Meigs is awesome!

It is not easy to imagine battles being fought so near here, but it sure is easy to imagine the hardships. The swamp(s) alone would have been difficult to deal with and then add the cold...

Lake Erie and Commodore Perry did play a pivotal role, too. Saw a great documentary on our local (Toledo, Ohio) PBS station on the battles in Lake Erie.


13 posted on 01/19/2014 3:36:50 PM PST by madison10
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To: madison10

Thanks for this post. We are fortunate to have people dedicated to keeping alive and re-enacting these historic events. Hopefully some of those kids watching this will have their imaginations stirred and will be inspired to follow through with either amateur or professional careers in history.


14 posted on 01/19/2014 3:36:59 PM PST by COBOL2Java (I'm a Christian, pro-life, pro-gun, Reaganite. The GOP hates me. Why should I vote for them?)
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To: mountainlion

There were a lot of prettyboy generals on both sides in the civil war. That’s why some of the most successful spies were females who could walk from one side to the other without question.

Its kinda funny really because so many of the generals had been West Point classmates.


15 posted on 01/19/2014 3:37:37 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: madison10

The massacre of the prisoners didn’t exactly end Proctor’s career but it definitely killed its growth.

Canadians weren’t wild about the war in the first place and it angered them a great deal when Proctor left the American prisoners and wounded to be slaughtered by the indians.


16 posted on 01/19/2014 3:40:46 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: madison10

I visited the Perry Victory Memorial in Put-In-Bay, also. That was a tough visit. I was there for a bachelor party and I was so hungover I could barely move.


17 posted on 01/19/2014 3:42:13 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: madison10

A re-enactment?

Who do they get to play the role of the bloodthirsty savages...I mean...”Native Americans?”


18 posted on 01/19/2014 3:42:17 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: cripplecreek

Battle of Fort Wayne. Duh, never occurred to me that Fort Wayne, Indiana WAS a fort. Thanks for posting this.

A person could take a tour in and around the Midwest/Great Lakes of all the battlefields and forts and spend a whole summer on the search. Visiting one of the islands in Lake Erie would be great. (West Sister maybe?)

“Don’t give up the ship!” ~~ Oliver Hazzard Perry


19 posted on 01/19/2014 3:44:15 PM PST by madison10
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To: cripplecreek
Its kinda funny really because so many of the generals had been West Point classmates.

So it was PLEASE don't ask....? ;)

20 posted on 01/19/2014 3:47:13 PM PST by madison10
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To: madison10

The old Fort in Detroit is also known as Fort Wayne.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fort_Wayne_%28Detroit%29


21 posted on 01/19/2014 3:50:28 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

LOL Thus Wayne County. Need to do more studying on this, especially since the War of 1812 and its history is basically outside the back door.

Thanks for the history lesson. :)


22 posted on 01/19/2014 3:54:37 PM PST by madison10
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To: madison10
I live on the upper reaches of the River Raisin in a tiny town named for Michigan's first senator. (John Norvell) He was friendly with Thomas Jefferson. Norvell asked for advice on starting a newspaper and Jefferson informed him that the people don't want news, they want to be entertained.

Letter To John Norvell On On Hume's Histories of England - Washington, June 14, 1807

To your request of my opinion of the manner in which a newspaper should be conducted, so as to be most useful, I should answer, `by restraining it to true facts & sound principles only.' Yet I fear such a paper would find few subscribers. It is a melancholy truth, that a suppression of the press could not more compleatly deprive the nation of it's benefits, than is done by it's abandoned prostitution to falsehood. Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper. Truth itself becomes suspicious by being put into that polluted vehicle. The real extent of this state of misinformation is known only to those who are in situations to confront facts within their knolege with the lies of the day. I really look with commiseration over the great body of my fellow citizens, who, reading newspapers, live & die in the belief, that they have known something of what has been passing in the world in their time; whereas the accounts they have read in newspapers are just as true a history of any other period of the world as of the present, except that the real names of the day are affixed to their fables. General facts may indeed be collected from them, such as that Europe is now at war, that Bonaparte has been a successful warrior, that he has subjected a great portion of Europe to his will, &c., &c.; but no details can be relied on. I will add, that the man who never looks into a newspaper is better informed than he who reads them; inasmuch as he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. He who reads nothing will still learn the great facts, and the details are all false.
23 posted on 01/19/2014 4:06:02 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: madison10

1st Kentucky Volunteer Rifle Regiment, Lieutenant John Williamson, was my 4th great grand uncle, brother to my 4th gr grandfather, Moses.
He was killed in this battle.
Thank you for adding to our family records by posting this informative thread.


24 posted on 01/19/2014 4:10:21 PM PST by wildehunt
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To: cripplecreek
What has been will be again, what has been done will be done again; there is nothing new under the sun. ~~King Solomon

Thomas Jefferson was a wise man no doubt and knew people.

25 posted on 01/19/2014 4:11:23 PM PST by madison10
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To: madison10

Its interesting that Jefferson seemed to be expressing some doubts about Napoleon’s greatness at a time when Napoleon was extremely popular in America. The next nearest town to me is Napoleon Michigan.


26 posted on 01/19/2014 4:15:14 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

There is one not too far away in Ohio as well. Was it the case that Americans were romantics at heart and thought any revolution was a good revolution?


27 posted on 01/19/2014 4:21:26 PM PST by madison10
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To: madison10
Was it the case that Americans were romantics at heart and thought any revolution was a good revolution?

I suspect that was a lot of it, plus we had been allied with the French in the American revolution.
28 posted on 01/19/2014 4:26:54 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: madison10

Right up the road from you at Bay City is the annual “River of Time” reenactments of several periods. It is well worth your visit.


29 posted on 01/19/2014 5:29:02 PM PST by healy61
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To: mountainlion

Custer was a brevet brigadier during the war. His permanent rank after the war was lieutenant colonel.

He was the executive officer of the 7th Regiment of Calvary and the de-facto field commander. When they departed Fort Lincoln in the summer of 1876 the regimental commander was back at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri.


30 posted on 01/19/2014 5:33:11 PM PST by Rockpile
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To: madison10

I don’t have to remember the rasin, I eat them all the time.


31 posted on 01/19/2014 5:35:42 PM PST by dalereed
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To: madison10

It seems that almost all the big fights and killings of the Indian Wars were east of the Mississippi.


32 posted on 01/19/2014 5:36:42 PM PST by Rockpile
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To: mountainlion
No, Custer was a General. But he was a brevet general, which means it was a temporary rank. He was later named a major general of volunteers which is also a temporary promotion. After the war he resumed his permanent rank of captain. At the time of little big horn he was a Colonel in the regular army. While it is true that little big horn was a grade A clusterf**k, Custer's contribution to the 3rd day of Gettysburg was absolutely vital. Without his contribution, Meades army would've been flanked at the south end of the federal line.

CC

33 posted on 01/19/2014 5:41:45 PM PST by Celtic Conservative (tease not the dragon for thou art crunchy when roasted and taste good with ketchup)
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To: cripplecreek

Some old fiddle tunes still popular today: Bonaparte Crossing the Rhine; Bonaparte’s Retreat; and one other Bonaparte song that escapes me this moment.


34 posted on 01/19/2014 5:45:34 PM PST by healy61
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To: Celtic Conservative

The department of the army contributed a fair bit to massacre at the Little Bighorn themselves. Custer’s big mistake was in ditching the big guns. His other big mistake was in attacking but he had no reason to believe that the indians wouldn’t run as they had always done before.

In my opinion, Custer’s widow hurt him badly when she refused to allow an investigation of her husband after the massacre. In those days they deferred to the widow and it allowed rumors to run rampant. I’ve read that there were also some concerns about what fault the department of defense might hold so they just dumped it on the dead guy. The indians themselves seemed to have the highest opinion of him with some saying he was still firing a pistol in each hand with multiple arrows in him.

Then along came Hollywood to complete the legend.

I personally think repeating rifles would have made the difference. The Springfield carbine Model 1873 was a fine rifle but it just didn’t fire fast enough. (About 10 rounds per minute I believe)


35 posted on 01/19/2014 6:07:26 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek
Yeah, dumping his gatling guns was a bad move, as well as boxing his troops sabers to be sent to the rear with the gatlings. Some accounts have him refusing the help of troops from other brigades (such as the 2nd cavalry). Say what you will about little big horn the man was a godsend on the 3rd day of Gettysburg. And on the whole I believe I must think that history has been somewhat unfair to Custer. JMHO

CC

36 posted on 01/19/2014 7:13:08 PM PST by Celtic Conservative (tease not the dragon for thou art crunchy when roasted and taste good with ketchup)
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To: Celtic Conservative

I think Custer is a far more interesting figure than history portrays him to be.

Very hard to like as an equal but loved by his superiors because he was willing to take on fights they were afraid to take on. His subordinates seem to have seen him as arrogant as a first impression but learned to love and respect him because he led from the front and not through a telescope a half mile back. He seemed to struggle as an officer in peacetime.

If there had been napalm in his day, he would have been the one to say “I love the smell of napalm in the morning”.


37 posted on 01/19/2014 8:10:25 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: cripplecreek

"Sioux don't surf !"

38 posted on 01/20/2014 3:25:23 AM PST by fieldmarshaldj (Resist We Much)
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To: fieldmarshaldj
One of my fantasies is to stick fake arrows in the haunches of Custer's horse that's the statue in Monroe.

Custer Statue--Monroe, MI

There aren't any trees around it now...or the old soldiers. ;)

39 posted on 01/20/2014 8:34:35 AM PST by madison10
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To: madison10

Play nice, now.


40 posted on 01/20/2014 9:22:01 AM PST by fieldmarshaldj (Resist We Much)
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To: cripplecreek

I don't know if you've seen this yet or not, but Don Troiani is just about finished with his painting of the Battle of the Thames.

41 posted on 05/27/2014 8:31:05 PM PDT by Stonewall Jackson (I aim to misbehave.)
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