Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Questionable Ethics of Teaching My Son to Love Pro Football
The Atlantic ^ | January 16, 2014 | Peter Beinart

Posted on 01/20/2014 11:16:36 AM PST by deks

Subtitle:
Fathers and sons have bonded over football games for generations, but today it's harder for parents to ignore the growing concerns surrounding the sport.

Excerpt:
My son, unfamiliar with the NFL’s pieties, assumed that hurting the other team’s players was the goal. To his untutored eye, the violence that guilt-ridden fans like myself decry was a feature, not a bug. He didn’t cheer the injuries; he’s too sweet for that. But despite my insistence to the contrary, I suspect the message he took from the experience was: The only thing you need to know about the large man writhing in agony on the screen is whether he’s on our team.

(Excerpt) Read more at theatlantic.com ...


TOPICS: History; Society; Sports
KEYWORDS: culturewar; football; memebuilding; nfl; partisanmediashill; partisanmediashills; peterbeinart; profootball; savethemales; sports; theatlantic
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-58 next last
Rush Limbaugh is talking about this today...saying "pointy headed intellectuals" are agonizing about football, the eventuality being that it will be banned. "I warned everybody that this stuff was going to happen," Rush said.

And he has been talking about it for years. Reminds me of the parody on his show about the organization called Keep Our Own Kids Safe, aka KOOKS. Hitting a soccer ball with your head could be dangerous :)

1 posted on 01/20/2014 11:16:36 AM PST by deks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: deks
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xmotigTTTUY
2 posted on 01/20/2014 11:19:27 AM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: deks
It's not that complicated, folks: if you put a 4lb. helmet on someone's head, some will try to hit others with it during the game. I am not familiar with Rush's complaint, but I hope he's smart enough to realize that the sport is heading (pun) in the wrong direction, for this reason.

It's a business, and if you don't look out, the lawyers will put it out of business. And there won't be any anti-trust exemptions to help you.

3 posted on 01/20/2014 11:23:30 AM PST by 1rudeboy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: deks; Revolting cat!; GeronL; Slings and Arrows

Why bother? They’ve gayed it up with disco diva dance singers, pink ribbons for abortionists, and refuse to air footage of cheerleaders shaking their hips.

Add to it the thuggary and billion dollar welfare queens who make dime off the public taxpayers.

WHO NEEDS IT?


4 posted on 01/20/2014 11:30:26 AM PST by a fool in paradise ("Health care is too important to be left to the government.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: a fool in paradise
and refuse to air footage of cheerleaders shaking their hips

They don't shake hips any more, they do booty call dances to raunchy rap lyrics, they start them on that in elementary school these days

5 posted on 01/20/2014 11:36:22 AM PST by GeronL (Extra Large Cheesy Over-Stuffed Hobbit)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: deks

I don’t think you have to be a pointy headed intellectual to look at the concussion data and second guess a decision to let a kid play football. I love the game, but permanent brain damage is a scary thing. The especially scary one to look at it Chris Henry, never missed a game due to head injury and yet had tons of brain damage they found in his autopsy, which probably contributed to him being such a discipline case.


6 posted on 01/20/2014 11:39:20 AM PST by discostu (I don't meme well.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: deks

The sissies (including our president), are all venting their fear of football.


7 posted on 01/20/2014 11:40:33 AM PST by ozzymandus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: a fool in paradise

Isn’t the pink for breast cancer?


8 posted on 01/20/2014 11:42:24 AM PST by POWERSBOOTHEFAN (I'm tired of the Liberals and their stupidity!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: FReepers

Click The Pic To Donate

Support FR, Donate Monthly If You Can

9 posted on 01/20/2014 11:42:32 AM PST by DJ MacWoW (The Fed Gov is not one ring to rule them all)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: POWERSBOOTHEFAN
The pink ribbon campaign is specifically for the pro-abort Susan G. Komen Foundation. They started it in 1991.

And men can get breast cancer more are more likely to experience it in other forms.

10 posted on 01/20/2014 11:48:14 AM PST by a fool in paradise ("Health care is too important to be left to the government.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: ozzymandus

> The sissies (including our president), are all venting their fear of football.

You’d think all those sissies would ooh and ahh over al those big healthy “bear” types


11 posted on 01/20/2014 11:48:23 AM PST by jsanders2001
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: deks

Who is this girly-man trying to fool? He doesn’t like football. He’s just piling onto the latest girly-man PC cause.


12 posted on 01/20/2014 11:50:25 AM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (Who knew that one day professional wrestling would be less fake than professional journalism?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: deks

If the NFL takes measures to make the game a little safer, I may or may not agree.

For example:
Clipping, as a penalty, is a good thing.
Rough the passer, as a penalty, has been overused.
Ball-carrier lowering his head, as a penalty, is just wrong.

But when the NFL started issuing penalties for “taunting” and “excessive celebration”, that is a dead give-away that liberals are in charge of the game and it is only a matter of time.


13 posted on 01/20/2014 11:50:57 AM PST by kidd
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

The cheerleaders are BARELY broadcast on NFL games at all (you have to really look to see a glimpse) and on SeeBS yesterday (same network that aired Elvis on Sullivan over 55 years ago) they were shot strictly above the waist.

Car ads had women driving them with submissive men in the back. Technology ads had single parent women raising their kids.

I don’t own a tv anymore. I rarely watch professional sports, let alone on tv, anymore.

But I know what I see.


14 posted on 01/20/2014 11:51:34 AM PST by a fool in paradise ("Health care is too important to be left to the government.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

“They don’t shake hips any more, they do booty call dances to raunchy rap lyrics,”

Is that like ‘twerking’? ;-)


15 posted on 01/20/2014 11:52:09 AM PST by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (What we need is to sucker the fedthugs into a "Tiananmen Square"-like incident on the National Mall!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: deks

The guy who started all of this ‘concussion’ stuff was an ex-NFL’er who then became a pro wrestler. He suffered head and neck injuries in pro-wrestling then for some unknown reason went after the NFL instead of pro-wrestling.


16 posted on 01/20/2014 11:54:59 AM PST by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (What we need is to sucker the fedthugs into a "Tiananmen Square"-like incident on the National Mall!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: a fool in paradise

I want to see a specific color and ribbon campaign for testicular and/or prostate cancer during sporting events instead of every other commercial being a ED ad.


17 posted on 01/20/2014 11:59:22 AM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: kidd

“excessive celebration”

I would like to see ALL celebrations be made against the rules, period.

These are, after all, professionals. I wonder what my boss would have said if I had jumped up and started dancing just because I did a good job. I would have been terminated on the spot!

Besides, all of these celebrants and ‘dances’ look GAY!


18 posted on 01/20/2014 12:00:23 PM PST by spel_grammer_an_punct_polise (What we need is to sucker the fedthugs into a "Tiananmen Square"-like incident on the National Mall!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: deks
I'm surprised this metro sexual knows how to find football on the TV

Or was able to have a child with a woman.....

19 posted on 01/20/2014 12:02:08 PM PST by capydick (''Life's tough.......it's even tougher if you're stupid.'')
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: kidd

The penalties are rigged to generate more offense, not a fair game. People equate high scores with better football. No telling how many RB’s and WR’s I see stiff arm and put their hands in the defenders face mask (and in slow motion you can see the pull on it) but it is never called. Let a DB put his hands even close and it is flagged. Defender tackles with his head and he is flagged, but let a RB hit the hole and put his head down and hit a defenders helmet and it is “hard running”. Hypocritical BS. Make helmets lighter and take away/shrink most pads and they will form tackle again.

Pass interference spot foul is wrong in so many ways and has changed game outcomes in the wrong. 15 and a 1st is good enough. Last two minutes is always throwing deep hoping for the flag because you spent the previous 48 minutes playing like crap.


20 posted on 01/20/2014 12:06:51 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: a fool in paradise

I watched neither game yesterday but I know the results so I know who will be in the superbowl. That is about the extent of my interest. I may watch the game for its novelty factor of an open air stadium in winter in a cold climate but to be honest living in Canada the Grey Cup is often contested upon frozen tundra so its no big deal. This weekend there will be a hockey game played in the open air of Dodger Stadium. That might be even more of a novelty than this years superbowl.


21 posted on 01/20/2014 12:07:23 PM PST by xp38
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: deks

Rush is an idiot.

I played football. My kids played football. Given what we now know, I wouldn’t have played nor would I have let my kids play. There is no question that the dangers of playing were covered up. There is “violent sport” and then there is “gladiators dying for others amusement”. Pro football became the latter. I SO love the game and I hope they fix it. It looks like they may. But there comes a time when I can find other ways to be amused that do not involve someone dying ... or worse.


22 posted on 01/20/2014 12:10:09 PM PST by RIghtwardHo
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: spel_grammer_an_punct_polise

Walter Peyton said he didn’t celebrate because he wanted to act like he had been in the endzone before and would be again. (something to that effect)


23 posted on 01/20/2014 12:10:52 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Yo-Yo

That show is funny.


24 posted on 01/20/2014 12:12:29 PM PST by raybbr (I weep over my sons' future in this Godforsaken country.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: RIghtwardHo

I agree. It is a modern version of gladiator games. My older boys played, 10 years later my youngest teenager will not, ever.


25 posted on 01/20/2014 12:12:32 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: kidd

Turf also changed the game for the worst and creates more injuries. Bowman’s injury (IMO) may not have been so severe had his leg been able to slide back but the turf held it.


26 posted on 01/20/2014 12:13:53 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: RIghtwardHo

You mean it took these lawsuits for you to realize that you could get hurt playing football? I hope you don’t stand with the liberals when they eventually ban the sport. As usual rush is exactly right.


27 posted on 01/20/2014 12:19:55 PM PST by ohioman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: deks

Rush Limbaugh is talking about this today...saying “pointy headed intellectuals” are agonizing about football, the eventuality being that it will be banned

...that is true...to an extent...the pointy heads want football banned, all right, but not because it’s unsafe (if studies should emerge about dangers in soccer, these same people wouldn’t say boo), but because little girls can’t play football, and therefore it upsets the gender equity bunch and their utopian visions...the ideal sports scenario is a school fielding only teams which have both male and female versions...


28 posted on 01/20/2014 12:26:02 PM PST by IrishBrigade
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: a fool in paradise

“The cheerleaders are BARELY broadcast on NFL games at all (you have to really look to see a glimpse) and on SeeBS yesterday (same network that aired Elvis on Sullivan over 55 years ago) they were shot strictly above the waist.”

My wife, who was an outstanding marching band member in high school and our DIL who was a cheer leader in HS and college started complaining a couple of years ago about college tv dropping halftime coverage of the good college bands and cheer leaders, and pro football not showing the cheer leaders any more.

Instead they have bunch of aging jocks dissecting each play several times during the half time with a dozen so called instant replays of each play.


29 posted on 01/20/2014 12:32:47 PM PST by Grampa Dave ( Obamacare is a Trinity of Lies! Obamaganda is failing 24/7/365! Obamaganda witholl fail 24/7/365!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: deks
But it’s bad enough, especially when you remember that the people you’re watching brutalize themselves didn’t randomly choose to do so. They were steered toward the NFL by a society that offers poor black men few other, less violent, ways to attain wealth.

I’d like my son to one day be able to assess football dispassionately, and thus do his part to help society progress. But in helping him accurately judge the game, I’d also be inviting him to judge me. Far easier to curl up with him for this Sunday’s AFC championship game as father and son—co-conspirators.

His ideas about football are completely wrong and he obviously never played the game at any level past grade school. Here's why I say that...

Football is a very personal team sport. It teaches a lot of great things about life. It's personal because it is tough. The team effort relies on individuals physically dominating opposing players. And it is violent starting at the high school level (to a lesser degree and not before). While there are seemingly "big" collisions in 7th and 8th grade football, they are infrequent and made more dramatic by the otherwise slow motion of the game surrounding them. By the time one gets to college, the violent collisions are on most plays. Watching a game distorts the image of how hard the players are hitting each other precisely because the game is so fast. Only the open field high speed collisions seem to get noticed (and these are arguably some of the hardest hits). Unless you have experienced the amount of energy that is absorbed when a 310 lb guard and 275 lb defensive tackle collide after only accelerating for 3', you can't really begin to understand how personal it can get. But I digress...

The amount of miserable preparation, hard work, dedication and mental toughness that comes with the occasional (by comparison) glory builds the character of a man. The love of the game is not about the violence. It is about the bond that forms when men step onto the grid-iron together, with specific assignments, to engage in a physical battle. It's about the competition. You learn about dedication to a cause and individual self worth measured by teammates, coaches and fans. You learn about controlling emotions and pushing through pain and exhaustion when necessary. You learn humility and leadership. And yes, you learn to have respect for another man that you purposefully attempt to physically dominate in between the whistles. You also learn to accept that there is always a looming risk, danger even, of personal injury for the cause of the team that is greater than the individual. You learn to operate a levels most other people will never experience. You learn about physical, psychological and emotional limits, and you learn to surpass them. There is something about the end of an exhausting effort, battered and bruised as the adrenaline high starts to subside and the aches and exhaustion creep in, where you contemplate and reflect on your effort, the meaning of your pain. In victory and defeat there is intrinsic satisfaction in what you have done (hopefully) as a contributor to the team. That reflection continues the next morning, during films and turns back into work as you recall where you succeeded but focused on where you failed in order to work on how to improve both for yourself and for your team. Ultimately competition is what you love and glory is the reward you work so hard for.

I believe that only the military can otherwise teach and provide this experience (maybe wrestling). (I have never been in the military. So that is an unqualified assumption.).

I believe in the life lessons associated with the character development that football provides, especially at younger ages. There will be injuries. I have had several and my body has some lasting affects today (I only played a couple years of college football). But it was worth it in my opinion.

30 posted on 01/20/2014 12:40:06 PM PST by Tenacious 1 (My whimsical litany of satyric prose and avarice pontification of wisdom demonstrates my concinnity.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: jsanders2001

Rush had Beinart for lunch today. Especially telling was his skewering Beinhart’s hope that “a decent society” will someday eschew “violent games such as football”.

As El Rushbo often points out, it’s all about the chickification of America.


31 posted on 01/20/2014 12:41:05 PM PST by elcid1970 ("In the modern world, Muslims are living fossils.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: Resolute Conservative

I agree. It is a modern version of gladiator games

...for the most part, that is due to the demographic change in the participants...the inner city youth have emerged and have dominated the game, and with it they bring the culture their lives reflect...

...I wouldn’t refer to the NFL as ‘gladiatorial’, as gladiators were after all slaves fighting for their freedom...hardly the case in the pro football...it’s more like who can be the most ‘alpha’ of all the alpha males on the field...all the woofing and chest thumping indicates such...

...by the way,I agree with the other poster in hoping you stand against banning the game...


32 posted on 01/20/2014 12:44:06 PM PST by IrishBrigade
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: AdmSmith; AnonymousConservative; Berosus; bigheadfred; Bockscar; cardinal4; ColdOne; ...

Partisan Media Shills meme-building marches on.

Obviously Journolist is alive and well. Thanks deks.

Obama Compares Pro Football to Smoking, Says He Wouldn’t Let Son Play
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/bloggers/3113661/posts


33 posted on 01/20/2014 12:45:48 PM PST by SunkenCiv (;http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: spel_grammer_an_punct_polise

The gyrating celebration posturing and self-aggrandizing chest pounding after every marginally successful feat make it basically unwatchable. Same thing with the NBA. Penalties affecting the result of the game, reviewable footage and modern officiating make other players self-policing the jerks impossible.

There’s a reason nobody breaks out into dance moves and points at the pitcher after hitting a routine single off him.

FReegards


34 posted on 01/20/2014 12:46:48 PM PST by Ransomed
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: Tenacious 1

“The love of the game is not about the violence”

I will argue that the last 10-15 years or so it is all about money, period.


35 posted on 01/20/2014 12:48:33 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Resolute Conservative

Barry Sanders did the same but for a different reason. He said there was nothing to celebrate because he hadn’t won anything. “Now if I score the winning TD in the Super Bowl then I will celebrate”


36 posted on 01/20/2014 12:48:55 PM PST by bjorn14 (Woe to those who call good evil and evil good. Isaiah 5:20)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: deks

People have the choice of whether they want to subject themselves to the risks of playing football. Government robs and controls all of us and we have no choice. Leave it to liberals to get all worked up about the wrong thing.


37 posted on 01/20/2014 12:49:06 PM PST by all the best (`~!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: deks
I've been completely disinterested in football since I was old enough to think of it as a sport.

It was always 6 seconds of action followed by minutes of spitting, scratching, etc.

I played football in Jr. High, attended one football game in High School (1968) and have never watched a game since.

I know people enjoy it and that's fine with me.

However, the attraction is still a puzzle.

38 posted on 01/20/2014 12:50:09 PM PST by elkfersupper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: deks

Geez, I always thought Peter Beinart was gay.


39 posted on 01/20/2014 12:50:23 PM PST by Rummyfan (Iraq: it's not about Iraq anymore, it's about the USA!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: deks

Beinart was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His parents were Jewish immigrants from South Africa.

His mother, Doreen (née Pienaar), is former director of the Harvard’s Human Rights film series at the John F. Kennedy School of Government. His stepfather is theatre critic and playwright Robert Brustein


40 posted on 01/20/2014 12:52:04 PM PST by kcvl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: IrishBrigade

I don’t care if it is banned or not. I watch maybe 3 games a year (if you aggregate the time I watch portions here and there). I spend no money on football outside the electricity my wife uses to watch her team the few times we get them on the basic cable package channels.

Years back I watch every weekend, I have better things to do and so do my sons.


41 posted on 01/20/2014 12:52:30 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Resolute Conservative

I will argue that the last 10-15 years or so it is all about money, period.

...at the high school and college level, it’s ‘all about the money, period’...?


42 posted on 01/20/2014 12:52:32 PM PST by IrishBrigade
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: RIghtwardHo
I played football. My kids played football. Given what we now know, I wouldn’t have played nor would I have let my kids play. There is no question that the dangers of playing were covered up. There is “violent sport” and then there is “gladiators dying for others amusement”. Pro football became the latter. I SO love the game and I hope they fix it. It looks like they may. But there comes a time when I can find other ways to be amused that do not involve someone dying ... or worse

I disagree. I played at the college level and had two diagnosed concussions in my career. One was serious. By today's standards of a concussion, I expect I may have had many many more. Why? You know the term "getting your bell rung"? I know what that is. It's when you take a hit to the head and things get confusing for a few seconds. You actually do see stars of sorts. There is a ringing in your ears and you are disorientated for a few seconds. You do get an instant headache for a few minutes but it goes away after a play or two. There are differing degrees. But from varsity football on, I would guess this happened to me (and likely many others) about once a game (not every game but close)and likely during practice once a week. I never wanted to give an opponent the satisfaction of seeing that a hit hurt.

Maybe I have done some damage to my brain. I certainly don't feel it (my wife may have a different opinion). But what I learned in football and the character I am today, I attribute a good measure to my experience in football. See my previous post about the game in this thread.

43 posted on 01/20/2014 12:52:45 PM PST by Tenacious 1 (My whimsical litany of satyric prose and avarice pontification of wisdom demonstrates my concinnity.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: elkfersupper

It was always 6 seconds of action followed by minutes of spitting, scratching, etc.

...for spitting and scratching between the action, baseball has football beat by a mile...


44 posted on 01/20/2014 12:55:23 PM PST by IrishBrigade
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Tenacious 1

Maybe 20 years ago, it is all about the Benjamins.

“You learn humility and leadership”. Maybe a handful of players per team, the rest do not.

“The amount of miserable preparation, hard work, dedication and mental toughness that comes with the occasional (by comparison) glory builds the character of a man.” Again not so much. There are some that learn the lesson. Most do not and it in no way it compares to character formed in combat military action, in no way shape or form.


45 posted on 01/20/2014 12:57:51 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: IrishBrigade

Yes, but not for the players yet. It is all about booster money and recruitment. It is about grooming those players that have the potential to play the big show. Hence it is all about money.


46 posted on 01/20/2014 1:01:06 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: Resolute Conservative
I will argue that the last 10-15 years or so it is all about money, period.

At the professional level and for all but the players, I might agree. But I tell you, FRiend, for most of the players at the pro level, the work and dedication that it takes to stay competitive will weed out those in it for the money after a few short years. Most of those guys HAVE to still have some love for the game to do what they do. Many get out early when that love starts to wain. The Jeff Saturday's and Brett Favres of the world (for instance) loved the game.

47 posted on 01/20/2014 1:01:13 PM PST by Tenacious 1 (My whimsical litany of satyric prose and avarice pontification of wisdom demonstrates my concinnity.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: deks
His wife, Diana Hartstein Beinart, gave up her job in the Obama administration vetting judicial nominees this summer when Beinart took a job at the CUNY Graduate Center, teaching in the journalism and political science departments.
48 posted on 01/20/2014 1:02:07 PM PST by kcvl
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Tenacious 1

That is the minority.


49 posted on 01/20/2014 1:02:52 PM PST by Resolute Conservative
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: Resolute Conservative
There are some that learn the lesson. Most do not and it in no way it compares to character formed in combat military action, in no way shape or form.

Let me restate that. Football is about as close as you can come to what experience you might get in the military. And actual combat is in a class all it's own. And that was not my original idea. A combat veteran actually told me that.

I suppose I am speaking in generalities based on my own experience. I would argue that "most" due and "some" do not learn the lessons. The % goes up at the higher levels of the game (College and pro for instance). The difference in the game between high school and college is astonishing. I imagine the difference between college and pro is also a huge jump.

50 posted on 01/20/2014 1:06:37 PM PST by Tenacious 1 (My whimsical litany of satyric prose and avarice pontification of wisdom demonstrates my concinnity.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 45 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-58 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
General/Chat
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson