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A blast from winter past(1977 Buffalo winter)
WBEN-TV, YouTube ^ | January 31, 1977 | WBEN-TV

Posted on 01/23/2014 2:57:29 PM PST by DallasBiff

I was fifteen during this winter. It was bitter.


TOPICS: Weather
KEYWORDS: climatechange
Huh? Why isn't the media reporting that a bitter winter in the NE USA has happened before.
1 posted on 01/23/2014 2:57:29 PM PST by DallasBiff
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To: DallasBiff

I left in ‘67. It was not a walk in the park for the prior 10 years.


2 posted on 01/23/2014 2:59:33 PM PST by Paladin2
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To: DallasBiff

Think how bad it would have been without global warming.


3 posted on 01/23/2014 3:02:59 PM PST by mountn man (The Pleasure You Get From Life Is Equal To The Attitude You Put Into It)
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To: DallasBiff

I was 40 miles south of Lake Erie that year. 182” of snow... snowed first 5 days of May.


4 posted on 01/23/2014 3:05:14 PM PST by Tijeras_Slim
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To: DallasBiff

It doesn’t support their global warming agenda.


5 posted on 01/23/2014 3:05:28 PM PST by b4its2late (A Progressive is a person who will give away everything he doesn't own.)
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To: Tijeras_Slim

Olean was snowed in.


6 posted on 01/23/2014 3:06:34 PM PST by b4its2late (A Progressive is a person who will give away everything he doesn't own.)
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To: DallasBiff

Michigan 78.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezBZd4OQOXg


7 posted on 01/23/2014 3:09:57 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: DallasBiff

great idea for the next blockbuster (documentary of the history of ice ages) maybe steven speelburg could call it,,,,”Al Gore Is A Complete Idiot”...{Part One}.


8 posted on 01/23/2014 3:14:32 PM PST by Cruz_West_Paul2016
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To: DallasBiff

It was sweetly cold here this morning at minus 3° F. with wind chill at minus 20° F.


9 posted on 01/23/2014 3:15:28 PM PST by Graybeard58 (_.. ._. .. _. _._ __ ___ ._. . ___ ..._ ._ ._.. _ .. _. .)
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To: Graybeard58

I think we’re going to get about a decade of rough winters.


10 posted on 01/23/2014 3:16:26 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: DallasBiff

Gotta give some credit to old Buffalo. In five years of college, the school was never closed once. We had 3 inches here in Virginia on Monday night, and the elementary school just left a message that school is cancelled AGAIN tomorrow.


11 posted on 01/23/2014 3:16:41 PM PST by ToastedHead
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To: DallasBiff
From 1975...

The "Grim Realities" of Global COOLING

"The central fact is that after three quarters of a century of extraordinarily mild conditions, the earth's climate seems to be cooling down. Meteorologists disagree about the cause and extent of the cooling trend, as well as over its specific impact on local weather conditions. But they are almost unanimous in the view that the trend will reduce agricultural productivity for the rest of the century. If the climatic change is as profound as some of the pessimists fear, the resulting famines could be catastrophic."

The Cooling World
Newsweek, April 28, 1975

There are ominous signs that the Earth's weather patterns have begun to change dramatically and that these changes may portend a drastic decline in food production– with serious political implications for just about every nation on Earth. The drop in food output could begin quite soon, perhaps only 10 years from now. The regions destined to feel its impact are the great wheat-producing lands of Canada and the U.S.S.R. in the North, along with a number of marginally self- sufficient tropical areas – parts of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Indochina and Indonesia – where the growing season is dependent upon the rains brought by the monsoon.

The evidence in support of these predictions has now begun to accumulate so massively that meteorologists are hard-pressed to keep up with it. In England, farmers have seen their growing season decline by about two weeks since 1950, with a resultant overall loss in grain production estimated at up to 100,000 tons annually. During the same time, the average temperature around the equator has risen by a fraction of a degree – a fraction that in some areas can mean drought and desolation. Last April, in the most devastating outbreak of tornadoes ever recorded, 148 twisters killed more than 300 people and caused half a billion dollars' worth of damage in 13 U.S. states.

To scientists, these seemingly disparate incidents represent the advance signs of fundamental changes in the world's weather. The central fact is that after three quarters of a century of extraordinarily mild conditions, the earth's climate seems to be cooling down. Meteorologists disagree about the cause and extent of the cooling trend, as well as over its specific impact on local weather conditions. But they are almost unanimous in the view that the trend will reduce agricultural productivity for the rest of the century. If the climatic change is as profound as some of the pessimists fear, the resulting famines could be catastrophic.

"A major climatic change would force economic and social adjustments on a worldwide scale," warns a recent report by the National Academy of Sciences, "because the global patterns of food production and population that have evolved are implicitly dependent on the climate of the present century."

A survey completed last year by Dr. Murray Mitchell of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration reveals a drop of half a degree in average ground temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere between 1945 and 1968. According to George Kukla of Columbia University, satellite photos indicated a sudden, large increase in Northern Hemisphere snow cover in the winter of 1971-72. And a study released last month by two NOAA scientists notes that the amount of sunshine reaching the ground in the continental U.S. diminished by 1.3% between 1964 and 1972.

To the layman, the relatively small changes in temperature and sunshine can be highly misleading. Reid Bryson of the University of Wisconsin points out that the Earth's average temperature during the great Ice Ages was only about seven degrees lower than during its warmest eras – and that the present decline has taken the planet about a sixth of the way toward the Ice Age average. Others regard the cooling as a reversion to the "little ice age" conditions that brought bitter winters to much of Europe and northern America between 1600 and 1900 – years when the Thames used to freeze so solidly that Londoners roasted oxen on the ice and when iceboats sailed the Hudson River almost as far south as New York City.

Just what causes the onset of major and minor ice ages remains a mystery. "Our knowledge of the mechanisms of climatic change is at least as fragmentary as our data," concedes the National Academy of Sciences report. "Not only are the basic scientific questions largely unanswered, but in many cases we do not yet know enough to pose the key questions."

Meteorologists think that they can forecast the short-term results of the return to the norm of the last century. They begin by noting the slight drop in overall temperature that produces large numbers of pressure centers in the upper atmosphere. These break up the smooth flow of westerly winds over temperate areas. The stagnant air produced in this way causes an increase in extremes of local weather such as droughts, floods, extended dry spells, long freezes, delayed monsoons and even local temperature increases – all of which have a direct impact on food supplies.

"The world's food-producing system," warns Dr. James D. McQuigg of NOAA's Center for Climatic and Environmental Assessment, "is much more sensitive to the weather variable than it was even five years ago." Furthermore, the growth of world population and creation of new national boundaries make it impossible for starving peoples to migrate from their devastated fields, as they did during past famines.

Climatologists are pessimistic that political leaders will take any positive action to compensate for the climatic change, or even to allay its effects. They concede that some of the more spectacular solutions proposed, such as melting the Arctic ice cap by covering it with black soot or diverting arctic rivers, might create problems far greater than those they solve. But the scientists see few signs that government leaders anywhere are even prepared to take the simple measures of stockpiling food or of introducing the variables of climatic uncertainty into economic projections of future food supplies. The longer the planners delay, the more difficult will they find it to cope with climatic change once the results become grim reality.

[end]

The Cooling World:
http://denisdutton.com/cooling_world.htm

Original Newsweek article with scary maps and graphs:
http://denisdutton.com/newsweek_coolingworld.pdf

12 posted on 01/23/2014 3:18:19 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: DallasBiff

The ‘77 freeze the inspiration for Jimmy Buffet’s lyric:

“Yeah, they’re freezin’ up in Buffalo stuck in their cars
And I’m lyin’ here ‘neath the sun and the stars “


13 posted on 01/23/2014 3:28:54 PM PST by Rebelbase (Tagline: optional, printed after your name on post)
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To: DallasBiff

I was in college in 77. Hard time, some bad things, but an amazing experience.


14 posted on 01/23/2014 3:35:40 PM PST by FatherofFive (Islam is evil and must be eradicated)
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To: FatherofFive

I was a college freshman in January 78; it was worse.


15 posted on 01/23/2014 3:59:31 PM PST by henkster (Communists never negotiate.)
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To: Paladin2

I was there too. In Orchard Park to be exact. I remember school was closed for the week. I also remember driving over a car on my buddies snowmobile. I was 13 @ the time. Was it the next spring when we had the ice storm?


16 posted on 01/23/2014 4:00:12 PM PST by woodbutcher1963
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To: b4its2late

They can take their global warming and shove it up their polar vortex.


17 posted on 01/23/2014 4:04:03 PM PST by tractorman (I never miss a chance to tweak a liberal.)
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To: ToastedHead
I watched the newscast and heard with great interest that Kenmore was basically open 'cause the crews worked 24/7 to keep up with the snowfall while Buffalo fell behind (down).

Back in the day our Town's road crews would hit our residential street up to 3x (or maybe more) per day, if required. Most trucks had a front plow and a wing plow. Occasionally a V-plow was used and we did have front end loaders (contracted from a local quarry) once to move the drifts back.

We had few snow days off from school.

It's a question of being prepared and having the can-do attitude.

Much of that seems to be lost these days.

18 posted on 01/23/2014 4:20:26 PM PST by Paladin2
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To: Paladin2

“having the can-do attitude.”

Yep, the stupid school district is teaching my kids that its ok to skip out of something if they might be a little uncomfortable. This “polar boogeyman” will have a growing effect on the economy as they all adopt this thinking in the years to come. We might even have to move Christmas to a summer month.


19 posted on 01/23/2014 4:46:28 PM PST by ToastedHead
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To: Paladin2

I left Buffalo about 3 months before that storm. Moved to florida.

Kenmore was an affluent suburb and could contract the extra effort.

Buffalo was union. The union would not share thaeir overtime with anybody. No extra help, no extra trucks.

Same as Sandy in New Jersey. Out of state line crews stopped at the state line by union thugs.


20 posted on 01/23/2014 5:26:32 PM PST by maine yankee (I got my Governor at 'Marden's')
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To: DallasBiff

http://www.flickr.com/photos/rondowling/8236828338/in/set-72157632150201836

Red River at Shreveport, December, 1983.


21 posted on 01/23/2014 5:34:57 PM PST by SgtBob (Freedom is not for the faint of heart. Semper Fi!)
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To: SgtBob

At the Amhest UB campus when the storm hit. Got stuck on the bus going to the Main St campus. Walked back to Emerald City in the blizzard. After two days we Ran out of food in the cafeteria. Took a sled to the 7/11 and bought beer to sell to our mates. Good times!


22 posted on 01/23/2014 6:59:41 PM PST by fiefdomone (Ranvar was a friend of mine.)
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To: DallasBiff
That video is fun to watch just for the weird hairstyles and clothing they wore back then. I can almost hear "Dancing Queen" by Abba in the background.

And the newscasters, they are so stilted and serious-looking. You get the impression their were soldiers with machine guns off-camera making sure they stuck to their scripts.

23 posted on 01/23/2014 8:52:06 PM PST by SamAdams76
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To: SamAdams76

And those commercials are cheesy beyond belief.


24 posted on 01/23/2014 9:02:27 PM PST by SamAdams76
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