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Poles discovered an over 8 thousand years old grain storage in Turkey
Naukawpolsce ^ | January 20, 2014 | Szymon Zdziebłowski

Posted on 01/27/2014 7:18:27 PM PST by SunkenCiv

The largest so far known in the Middle East amount of grain of the Neolithic period in a perfect state of preservation has been discovered by Polish archaeologists in Çatalhöyük, a famous archaeological site in Turkey...

In total, from each of the two studied containers archaeologists recovered almost 5 kg of grain. Such amount and such a good state of preservation is a global scale phenomenon. In addition, a different grain cluster was discovered in the room. Archeobotanical analysis showed that it was an extinct species of wheat, popular in Neolithic times in the Middle East and Europe. The room in which the discovery was made was situated in the north-eastern part of the homestead - it belonged to a larger residential building, inhabited 8,200 years ago. It was the final period of the large settlement. According to Prof. Marciniak, only few inhabited households remained on the hill at the time.

The entire structure will be exploted in the coming research seasons. It is known already that the grain storage must have burned down: grain was charred at the temperature of several hundred degrees. Nevertheless, archaeologists were able to determine that the walls of the room were whitened from the inside. In addition to the grain containers, archaeologists found several ceramic vessels, also used for storage...

Çatalhöyük was inhabited continuously for 1200 years between 7200 and 6000 BC. It is estimated that during its heyday, the densely built-up settlement with an area of dozens of acres had 6000 residents. The site became famous due to the paintings which decorated the walls of houses and other plastic interior decorations. They depicted human and animal figures as well as geometric motifs. An interesting fact is that the dead were buried under the floors of houses.

(Excerpt) Read more at naukawpolsce.pap.pl ...


TOPICS: History; Science
KEYWORDS: catalhoyuk; catalhuyuk; godsgravesglyphs; turkey
Containers for barley in the room where grain was stored. Photo by A. Marciniak

Containers for barley in the room where grain was stored. Photo by A. Marciniak

1 posted on 01/27/2014 7:18:27 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

2 posted on 01/27/2014 7:19:15 PM PST by SunkenCiv (;http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: SunkenCiv
Barley. Bet they were making beer.

/johnny

3 posted on 01/27/2014 7:19:53 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: SunkenCiv

The last time the Poles mixed it up with the Turks it went pretty bad for the Turks. It was nice of the Poles to find their grain. Maybe this will patch things up.


4 posted on 01/27/2014 7:25:04 PM PST by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: SunkenCiv

Preppers.


5 posted on 01/27/2014 7:25:16 PM PST by Kirkwood (Zombie Hunter)
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To: SunkenCiv
"John Barleycorn"

There were three men came out of the West,
Their fortunes for to try,
And these three men made a solemn vow:
John Barleycorn must die.

They've ploughed, they've sown, they've harrowed him in,
Threw clods upon his head,
And these three men made a solemn vow:
John Barleycorn was dead.

They've let him lie for a very long time,
Till the rains from heaven did fall,
And little Sir John sprung up his head,
And so amazed them all.

They've let him stand till midsummer's day,
Till he looked both pale and wan,
And little Sir John's grown a long, long beard,
And so become a man.

They've hired men with the scythes so sharp,
To cut him off at the knee,
They've rolled him and tied him by the way,
Serving him most barbarously.

They've hired men with the sharp pitchforks,
Who pricked him to the heart,
And the loader he has served him worse than that,
For he's bound him to the cart

They've wheeled him around and around the field,
Till they came unto a barn,
And there they made a solemn oath,
On poor John Barleycorn.

They've hired men with the crab-tree sticks,
To cut him skin from bone,
And the miller he has served him worse than that,
For he's ground him between two stones.

And little Sir John and the nut-brown bowl,
And he's brandy in the glass;
And little Sir John and the nut-brown bowl,
Proved the strongest man at last.

The huntsman, he can't hunt the fox,
Nor so loudly to blow his horn,
And the tinker he can't mend kettle nor pot,
Without a little Barleycorn


6 posted on 01/27/2014 7:30:29 PM PST by Chode (Stand UP and Be Counted, or line up and be numbered - *DTOM* -vvv- NO Pity for the LAZY - 86-44)
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To: SunkenCiv

I doubt a turkey stuffed with eight millennial-old grain would still be palatable ....


7 posted on 01/27/2014 7:39:13 PM PST by mikrofon (Na Zdrowie!)
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!!

Now that’s what I call food storage!!!


8 posted on 01/27/2014 8:00:19 PM PST by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: SunkenCiv

Odd that they buried the dead under the floors.
Stockpiling? Hhmmmm....Perhaps they were under seige.


9 posted on 01/27/2014 8:12:38 PM PST by SisterK (behold a pale horse)
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To: SunkenCiv

Well, this must have been high in the mountains, so as to miss the flood!!


10 posted on 01/27/2014 8:20:11 PM PST by Noob1999 (Loose Lips, Sink Ships)
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To: Kartographer

LOL


11 posted on 01/27/2014 8:20:53 PM PST by laplata (Liberals don't get it .... their minds are diseased.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Interesting!


12 posted on 01/27/2014 8:27:20 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: SunkenCiv

Heirloom wheat and barley and no GMOs.


13 posted on 01/27/2014 8:37:01 PM PST by bgill
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To: JRandomFreeper

Barely...


14 posted on 01/27/2014 9:20:00 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: bgill; SunkenCiv
Heirloom wheat and barley and no GMOs.

First community to be wiped out by gluten. Unfortunately, they had no idea what was killing them.

15 posted on 01/27/2014 9:37:22 PM PST by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch

The problem in America today isn’t gluten.
It’s gluttony!!


16 posted on 01/27/2014 10:18:23 PM PST by djf (OK. Well, now, lemme try to make this clear: If you LIKE your lasagna, you can KEEP your lasagna!)
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To: SisterK

Burying dead folks in the house isn’t as odd as you’d think; Catholics bury saints under chapels. I could see someone who believed that their ancestors stayed around to help them would see it as only logical to put them under the house, where they would be out of the way, yet still close enough to keep an eye on things.

Civilizations in South America mummified their dead kings, and then carried them at the head of their armies to provide leadership in battle. It’s not burying under a house, but the principle’s the same. The physical presence of the dead confer protection for their loved ones.


17 posted on 01/27/2014 10:28:00 PM PST by exodus
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To: SisterK

They did the same thing in ancient Sumer A curious practice


18 posted on 01/28/2014 2:36:15 AM PST by Jimmy Valentine (DemocRATS - when they speak, they lie; when they are silent, they are stealing the American Dream)
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To: SunkenCiv

That is around 11 pounds of grain. I would plant some of it.If it comes up you could revive that strain of grain.


19 posted on 01/28/2014 8:03:58 AM PST by painter ( Isaiah: “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil,")
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To: mikrofon

“I doubt a turkey stuffed with eight millennial-old grain would still be palatable ....”

You’ve never eaten my wife’s cooking! Of course, that’s not why I married her.


20 posted on 01/28/2014 10:38:44 AM PST by outofsalt (If history teaches us anything it's that history rarely teaches us anything.)
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To: Kartographer


21 posted on 01/28/2014 10:49:41 AM PST by Iron Munro ("Sooner or later everyone sits down to a banquet of consequences." - Robert Louis Stevenson)
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To: SunkenCiv

The entire structure will be exploted....

(((
Is “exploted” a new archaeology term I need to learn? :)

This sounds like quite a find. Do you think they would be able to do anything with the grain that was found?


22 posted on 01/28/2014 1:52:44 PM PST by Bigg Red (O LORD, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth! Ps 8)
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