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Cultural connections with Europe found in ancient Jordanian settlement
University of Gothenburg ^ | January 16, 2014 | Thomas Melin

Posted on 01/27/2014 8:33:42 PM PST by SunkenCiv

Swedish archaeologists in Jordan led by Professor Peter M. Fischer from the University of Gothenburg have excavated a nearly 60-metre long well-preserved building from 1100 B.C. in the ancient settlement Tell Abu al-Kharaz. The building is from an era characterised by major migration...

Pottery from one of the rooms from 1100 B.C.‘We have evidence that culture from present Europe is represented in Tell Abu al-Kharaz. A group of the Sea Peoples of European descent, Philistines, settled down in the city,’ says Peter Fischer. ‘We have, for instance, found pottery resembling corresponding items from Greece and Cyprus in terms of form and decoration, and also cylindrical loom weights for textile production that could be found in central and south-east Europe around the same time.’

Tell Abu al-Kharaz is located in the Jordan Valley close to the border to Israel and the West Bank. It most likely corresponds to the biblical city of Jabesh Gilead...

Peter M. Fischer and his team of archaeologists and students have surveyed an urban settlement that flourished three times over the 5 000 years: around 3100–2900 B.C. (Early Bronze Age), 1600–1300 B.C. (Late Bronze Age) and 1100–700 B.C. (Iron Age). These are the local periods; in Sweden, they occurred much later.

Remarkably well-preserved stone structures have been exposed during the excavations. The finds include defensive walls, buildings and thousands of complete objects produced locally or imported from south-east Europe...

The scientists have made several sensational finds in the last three years, especially during the excavation of the building from 1100 B.C. where containers still filled with various seeds were found. There are also finds from Middle Egypt that were exported to Tell Abu al-Kharaz as early as 3100 B.C...

(Excerpt) Read more at hum.gu.se ...


TOPICS: History; Science; Travel
KEYWORDS: catastrophism; cyprus; godsgravesglyphs; greece; jabeshgilead; jordan; letshavejerusalem; philistines; tellabualkharaz
Reconstruction of the building from 1100 B.C.

Reconstruction of the building from 1100 B.C.

1 posted on 01/27/2014 8:33:42 PM PST by SunkenCiv
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To: SunkenCiv

Philistines were of European descent?


2 posted on 01/27/2014 8:36:49 PM PST by Amberdawn
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Philistines: Giving Goliath His Due, Marco Polo Monographs, No. 7. Philistines: Giving Goliath His Due
Marco Polo Monographs, No. 7.

by Neal Bierling
foreword by Joe E. Seger


3 posted on 01/27/2014 8:38:36 PM PST by SunkenCiv (;http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: Amberdawn

It’s a chain of false syllogisms, imho.


4 posted on 01/27/2014 8:39:19 PM PST by SunkenCiv (;http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; decimon; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

5 posted on 01/27/2014 8:41:05 PM PST by SunkenCiv (;http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: 75thOVI; agrace; aimhigh; Alice in Wonderland; AndrewC; aragorn; aristotleman; Avoiding_Sulla; ...
One of *those* topics.

6 posted on 01/27/2014 8:42:39 PM PST by SunkenCiv (;http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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To: SunkenCiv

I thought the Sea People were thought to be from Greece or Anatolia? Same origins??


7 posted on 01/27/2014 8:56:56 PM PST by JimSEA
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To: SunkenCiv

Did they find Odysseus and Penelope or Menelaius and Helen?

It appears that the Egyptians kept written and drawn records of the various origins of the Sea Peoples, and the Greeks were one of the groups. This is so interesting as it explains why the Mycenae civilization, Agamenon and other Greeks in 1200+/- BC, stopped their writings—they moved after some kind of “environmental blight or disaster” that put all these people on the move. Writing by the Greeks didn’t start up again until Homer’s time around 750 BC. After those in Ionia stole the letters from the Phoenicians, Lebanon today. And then vowels were added. Thus, improving the Semitic approach of using only consonants (as I understand, adult Hebrew for example does not use vowels in their writing, but they do for children’s writing).


8 posted on 01/27/2014 9:23:33 PM PST by Hop A Long Cassidy
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To: SunkenCiv

It is possible that the Minoans of the time, the first European civilization, were actually of Egyptian descent. In that case, they’re really not Europeans.


9 posted on 01/27/2014 10:12:10 PM PST by Telepathic Intruder (The only thing the Left has learned from the failures of socialism is not to call it that)
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To: SunkenCiv

If, for example, we take the Bible literally, then the Earth was aplenty with ‘mankind’. On all the land. God wiped them all out (except for Noah and family) with a flood. Worldwide flood. Wouldn’t need to be world wide if humans didn’t live all over the world.

Then there are tsunamis and volcanoes. Hurricanes and Earthquakes. Tons of people die. Survivors move somewhere else.

Man has always been able to walk, and, if one believes the Bible, then has always been able to build a boat.

I see no reason to believe that any person, past or present, cannot make his way to anywhere else on the planet, if he really wants or needs to.

Our ancestors had even less doubts.


10 posted on 01/27/2014 11:22:14 PM PST by UCANSEE2 (I forgot what my tagline was supposed to say)
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To: Amberdawn

Some people think that “Philistine” comes from the same root word as “Pelasgian.”


11 posted on 01/28/2014 7:07:03 AM PST by Berosus (I wish I had as much faith in God as liberals have in government.)
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To: SunkenCiv

We’re coming full circle. Some day, if future archaeologists dig up artifacts from present-day Europe, they will find cultural influences from the Middle East, and speculate on how they got there.


12 posted on 01/28/2014 7:11:56 AM PST by Berosus (I wish I had as much faith in God as liberals have in government.)
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To: SunkenCiv
There are still Philistines among us:


13 posted on 01/28/2014 2:13:27 PM PST by colorado tanker
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To: Hop A Long Cassidy

The term “sea people” comes from Egypt, and only Egypt; there were no “sea people” as such — no potshards, distinctive burials, ruins, writing, no anything. Linear B (written form of Greek) apparently was developed from Linear A (generally believed to be non-Greek), and evidently cuneiform; classical Greek was attributed by the ancient Greeks to Cadmus, but the use of Linear B continued.

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/1202723/posts

http://www.varchive.org/ce/theses.htm (beginning at 99)


14 posted on 01/28/2014 11:54:52 PM PST by SunkenCiv (;http://www.freerepublic.com/~mestamachine/)
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