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AMERICANS BATTLE FOR CASSINO; PLANES SWARM OVER FOE’S LINES (2/10/44)
Microfilm-New York Times archives, Monterey Public Library | 2/10/44 | Milton Bracker, C.L. Sulzberger, Ralph Parker, Robert Trumbull, Drew Middleton

Posted on 02/10/2014 4:30:25 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson

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TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: milhist; realtime; worldwarii
Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
1 posted on 02/10/2014 4:30:25 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Selections from West Point Atlas for the Second World War
Eastern Europe, 1941: Russian Leningrad and Ukraine Offensives – Operations, 2 December 1943-30 April 1944
Allied Advance to Volturno River, Reorganization, and Attack on Gustav Line (17 January-11 May 1944)
Anzio-Cassino Area, 1943: Attempts to Cross Rapido and Garigliano Rivers, 17-20 January 1944. Anzio Landing, 22 January 1944. German Counterattack at Anzio, 16-19 February 1944
New Guinea and Alamo Force Operations: Clearing the Huon Peninsula and Securing the Straits, 19 September 1943-26 April 1944
Cartwheel, the Seizure of the Gilberts and Marshalls, and Concurrent Air and Naval Operations, 30 June 1943-26 April 1944
The Far East and the Pacific, 1941: Original Allied Strategic Concept, May 1943; Situation in Pacific, 1 November 1943
2 posted on 02/10/2014 4:30:53 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
[Continued from yesterday.]

10 February. Enemy on the Sibog-Sindaman track have dug in and now have at least four pillboxes there. An estimated company of 150-200 Japanese are in the position.

A patrol returning came to the scene of the action where Captain Mooney and 5 men were killed. They found all six bodies. One man with a BAR had been leading, followed by the Captain and the rest of the patrol. The BAR-man evidently was wounded, for his body was found in a ravine about fifteen feet from the trail where he had crawled and died. The Captain and three others were killed instantly. There was evidence that one Sergeant had been wounded and then bayonetted to death.

Advance elements of the Australian 5th Division advancing northwest along the coast made contact with Michaelmas Force.

The arrival of the Australians in the Saidor area officially ended the Michaelmas operation.

Major General H.W. Blakeley, USA, Ret., The 32d Infantry Division in World War II

3 posted on 02/10/2014 4:31:42 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Continued from February 8.

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Winston S. Churchill, Closing the Ring

4 posted on 02/10/2014 4:32:51 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
Crag-to-Crag Fight (Bracker) – 2-3
Planes Take Hand in Cassino Battle (Sulzberger) – 3
Nazis Introduce Their ‘Bazooka’ into the War in Italy (photo) – 3
Iron City Menaced (Parker) – 4
Ranger Sank Five Nazi Ships after Hitler had ‘Sunk’ Her – 5
Ranger’s Planes Attacking Nazi Ship in Norway (photo) – 5
Ranger’s Captain Admires Medal Hitler Awards for Not Sinking Ships (photo) – 6
Japanese Warships Quit Rabaul; Submarine, 19 Zeros in New Bag – 7
War News Summarized – 7
Kwajalein Gives Us Area Control (Trumbull) – 8
Britain Rebuffs Bombing Critics (Middleton) – 8
January Ship Loss to U-Boats ‘Lowest’ – 8
Operating Room off the Marshalls is Aboard a Troop Transport (photo) * – 9
Latest War Casualties – 10
The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on Fighting in Various Zones – 11-12
Says Taxes, Bonds Burden Office Help.

* I hope the surgeon at least has showered recently. Nice tat on the scrub nurse – HJS.

5 posted on 02/10/2014 4:34:13 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/feb44/f10feb44.htm

Australians link up with Americans
Thursday, February 10, 1944 www.onwar.com

American toops in New Guinea [photo at link]

In New Guinea... Australian forces advancing from Sio link up with American forces near Saidor. Allied forces now occupy most of the Huon Peninsula.

On the Eastern Front... Soviet forces of the 1st Ukrainian Front (Vatutin) capture Shepetovka.


6 posted on 02/10/2014 4:38:06 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/thismonth/10.htm

February 10th, 1944 (THURSDAY)

GERMANY:
U-872, U-1009, U-1203 commissioned.

U-880, U-1303 launched.

SPAIN: U-193 arrived in El Ferrol for repairs.

BURMA: Japanese troops take the Ngakyedauk Pass, cutting off the 7th Indian Division at Sinzweya.

The 1/7th Gurkhas fighting for “Bare Patch” move around the Japanese flank and by 2.20pm the Japanese, now denied water and almost completely surrounded, begin pulling out. Just over an hour later, the position is clear of Japanese. (Daily Telegraph, 21.10.2003, p.27)

NEW GUINEA: Australians from Sio link up with the Americans near Saidor.

CAROLINE ISLANDS: Japanese naval forces abandon Truk.

PACIFIC OCEAN:
Submarine USS Spearfish torpedoes and damages the Japanese transport ship Tatsuwa Maru (6345 BRT) SW of Formosa in position 21.53N, 119.13E.

Submarine USS Pogy torpedoes and sinks destroyer Minekaze and Malta Maru some 85 miles NNE of Formosa in position 23.12N, 121.30E.

CANADA: Frigate HMCS Antigonish launched Esquimalt, British Columbia.

U.S.A.: USS YMS-428 laid down.
Minesweeper USS Pochard laid down.

Minesweeper USS Caution commissioned.

USS PC-1180 commissioned.

ATLANTIC OCEAN: U-545 Kl. IXC/40 is Scuttled west of the Hebrides, in position 58.17N, 13.22W, after crippling damage from 4 depth charges dropped by a British Wellington aircraft (Sqdn. 612/O). 1 dead and 56 survivors.

U-666 Kl.VIIC Listed as missing in the North Atlantic. There is no explanation for its loss. 51 dead (all hands lost).

[U-545 was in fact attacked by two aircraft. The other one, a Canadian Wellington (Sqdn 407), was shot down during the attack.
The survivors were picked up by U-714 after a while and taken to St. Nazaire, France. Kptlt. Mannesmann then commanded U-2502. He died in an air raid on Hamburg on 8 April, 1945]

(Alex Gordon)


7 posted on 02/10/2014 4:39:25 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

went to a parochial Catholic grade school in the 1950s/60s. the nuns who were for the most part conservative but apolitical at the same time, were very upset when discussing it in history class. They felt that the allies should have found a way around Casino rather than reduce it to rubble. Of course the US spent whatever was needed to rebuild it.

in other news, in 1962 my 8th grade nun, told us that Kennedy could never(would never) sign a bill permitting abortion. as it was he never had that decision on his desk.


8 posted on 02/10/2014 4:47:05 AM PST by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Nice tat on the scrub nurse ...

Heh, that made me look!

9 posted on 02/10/2014 5:00:06 AM PST by Tax-chick (The platypus is a metaphor for anything that's keeping you down.)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

February 10, 1943:


"With his body held taut by two Kapos, a camp prisoner awaits the sting of the lash on his bare back.
Even the slightest offense could lead to harsh penalties.
Punishment, like this whipping, could so weaken an inmate that he could no longer work, and failure to work meant death.
This drawing by Hungarian artist Gyorgy Kadar, who survived five camps, powerfully conveys the inmate's suffering and anguish."


"Deportations of Dutch Jews began in 1942 and were largely complete two years later.
Most of the deportees were sent to Westerbork, and from there to Auschwitz or Sobibór.
Few Jewish citizens of the Netherlands remained in the country in 1944, and their options were limited: hide; pay outrageous sums to local extortionists who promised to delay or cancel deportation orders; or resist.
Here, members of the Dutch underground secrete a rifle and 9mm ammunition beneath a bathroom floor."



10 posted on 02/10/2014 5:24:47 AM PST by BroJoeK (a little historical perspective....)
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To: Vaquero
They felt that the allies should have found a way around Casino rather than reduce it to rubble.

Destroying the abbey didn't help the allied cause. The Germans hadn't occupied it but afterwards used the rubble for good defensive positions.

11 posted on 02/10/2014 5:35:06 AM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Page 9 headline: "BRITAIN REBUFFS BOMBING CRITICS
Cranborn Says Attacks Will Go On, After Clergymen Denounce RAF Actions"

The article lists both pros & cons for bombing German cities, leaving out some that, to later historians seem as, or more, important.
Chief among these is the fact that to defend its cities, Germans withdrew huge manpower and material resources from other fronts -- particularly in the East.
That effectively made allied bombing another "Second Front" Stalin kept asking for.

But in the end, those churchmen got their "last laugh", since once the bombings' purpose was accomplished, Churchill's government eventually turned against the bombers themselves, both to mollify the churchmen and in hopes of allying with post-war Germans against Stalin's Soviet Union.

12 posted on 02/10/2014 5:45:04 AM PST by BroJoeK (a little historical perspective....)
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To: BroJoeK

Every flak gun defending the skies of the Reich could have been shooting up T-34s instead.


13 posted on 02/10/2014 5:59:36 AM PST by henkster (Communists never negotiate.)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

I’ve seen that fact in a number of presentations on the Military channel. the rubble was a better high ground than the abbey itself. but who knew. all the allies knew was that the Germans had it and we needed to take it....

the allies did amphibious end runs around German lines on the peninsula though...like Anzio....but I do believe the mountainous spine of Italy was not completely defeated till operation overlord when the focus was on northern france and the Germans sent troops up that way...as did the allies.


14 posted on 02/10/2014 6:02:46 AM PST by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Vaquero

The other factor in Italy is the weather, which is hampering air operations and making the life of the infantryman an awful mess. Once summer comes with warm, dry weather, the allies can operate freely in the air, and mobility is restored to the ground units. Of course, Italy is a low priority for the Germans behind France and Russia. While they are not getting many replacements, the Germans did not feel the need to pull units out of Italy wholesale, as the offensive that broke the Gustav Line began before D-Day and also before the Soviet summer offensives.

I would say that while the Germans are making good use of the terrain, it’s really the weather that is keeping the Allies in check.


15 posted on 02/10/2014 7:58:33 AM PST by henkster (Communists never negotiate.)
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To: henkster

Weather and possibly the big Vesuvius eruption of 44


16 posted on 02/10/2014 8:31:27 AM PST by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Lt. Von Bulow survived the War and later was an officer in the W. German navy. Long odds, eh?

By the way, he really did torpedo a ship that he mistook for the Ranger.

17 posted on 02/10/2014 12:08:25 PM PST by colorado tanker
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To: BroJoeK; henkster; Homer_J_Simpson

One of the churchman’s points boils down to “disproportionate response.” We’re still dealing with that crap today. Your objective in war is to make the other guy suffer disproportionally.


18 posted on 02/10/2014 12:10:30 PM PST by colorado tanker
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To: Vaquero

The Allies in the Mediterranean did not have a lot of good options for offensive action after Sicily. Churchill was pushing for more dangerous adventures in Greece and the Balkans.


19 posted on 02/10/2014 12:16:09 PM PST by AU72
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Destroying the abbey didn't help the allied cause. The Germans hadn't occupied it but afterwards used the rubble for good defensive positions.

The Germans learned that lesson from Stalingrad, when the Russians used the rubble there to their advantage.

20 posted on 02/10/2014 12:22:50 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator
The Germans learned that lesson from Stalingrad, when the Russians used the rubble there to their advantage.

Saw the recent movie featuring dueling snipers in Stalingrad this weekend.

21 posted on 02/10/2014 12:25:25 PM PST by AU72
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To: AU72

Is that the “Russian” Stalingrad movie?


22 posted on 02/10/2014 12:26:54 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator
Is that the “Russian” Stalingrad movie?

No, it was 'Enemy at the Gates' staring Ed Harris, Joseph Fiennes and Jude Law.

23 posted on 02/10/2014 12:29:41 PM PST by AU72
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To: AU72

Oh, that movie is about 10 years old....It’s not bad, but I liked the German movie “Stalingrad” better.

The Russkies just came out with one as well, haven’t seen it yet, though.


24 posted on 02/10/2014 12:32:06 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

Page 3 nazi bazookas, are those early panzerfausts?


25 posted on 02/10/2014 12:43:35 PM PST by Rebelbase (Tagline: optional, printed after your name on post)
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To: Rebelbase

Indeed they are. They don’t have the flat head on the projectile like the later versions. And just yesterday I wrote about how the Germans had to rely on them as the quality of their conventional AP ammo declined with the loss of Portuguese tungsten.


26 posted on 02/10/2014 12:50:22 PM PST by henkster (Communists never negotiate.)
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To: AU72

Perhaps. operations Torch, Husky and the various attacks on mainland Italy were good for the training for the main event that was Overlord.

The failure that was the first attempt at Kasserine pass was invaluable for training the raw American forces. Better there, then on D-Day at Normandy.


27 posted on 02/10/2014 12:52:22 PM PST by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: Vaquero
Perhaps. operations Torch, Husky and the various attacks on mainland Italy were good for the training for the main event that was Overlord.

No doubt.

28 posted on 02/10/2014 12:53:58 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: Homer_J_Simpson

29 posted on 02/10/2014 12:59:40 PM PST by CougarGA7 ("War is an outcome based activity" - Dr. Robert Citino)
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To: Vaquero
Politically we had to establish an active front in Western Europe to help the Soviets but we didn't tie down a lot Germans in Italy.
30 posted on 02/10/2014 1:00:04 PM PST by AU72
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
"U-666 Kl.VIIC Listed as missing in the North Atlantic. There is no explanation for its loss. 51 dead (all hands lost)."

There is no explanation until now, it was found on Pilot Mt.:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2945552/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=USIcXKgU47I

31 posted on 02/10/2014 1:05:34 PM PST by Rebelbase (Tagline: optional, printed after your name on post)
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To: AU72
. . . but we didn't tie down a lot Germans in Italy.

To be cold blooded about it, we could afford to have multiple divisions in an Italian quagmire as long as the German were resisting. Just as the Soviets seemed to have an inexhaustible supply of bodies to put in Red Army uniforms. The Germans had a big problem in the east and were anticipating one in the west. Every German fighting in Italy reduced the number available to meet those problems by one.

32 posted on 02/10/2014 1:07:39 PM PST by Homer_J_Simpson ("Every nation has the government that it deserves." - Joseph de Maistre (1753-1821))
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To: dfwgator

“The Russkies just came out with one as well, haven’t seen it yet, though.”

I managed to watch about 40 min. of it. The copy I saw was all in Russian and German. There’s a lot of CGI in it, at times almost as bad as The 300.


33 posted on 02/10/2014 1:08:28 PM PST by Rebelbase (Tagline: optional, printed after your name on post)
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To: dfwgator

“The Russkies just came out with one as well, haven’t seen it yet, though.”

I managed to watch about 40 min. of it. The copy I saw was all in Russian and German. There’s a lot of CGI in it, at times almost as bad as The 300.


34 posted on 02/10/2014 1:08:28 PM PST by Rebelbase (Tagline: optional, printed after your name on post)
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To: Homer_J_Simpson
Every German fighting in Italy reduced the number available to meet those problems by one.

Like I said early, there were no good options on that front. But it was better than letting Churchill try another Gallapoli.

35 posted on 02/10/2014 1:13:29 PM PST by AU72
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To: AU72
Also the biggest limiting factor were the number of available amphibious landers.

The Pacific War used a lot and D-Day required more than we had or could crank out.

36 posted on 02/10/2014 1:16:00 PM PST by AU72
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To: AU72

Help the Russians. Help the Russians. When the Germans tried to get us to join with them against the Soviets (after we had severely thrashed the Germans ). We should have taken them up on it. Patton would have.

Ah... Shoulda Woulda Coulda

And hey! The Italians couldn’t wait to join us and hang Il Duce by his nards. (If they were any help)


37 posted on 02/10/2014 2:33:25 PM PST by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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To: AU72
Like I said early, there were no good options on that front. But it was better than letting Churchill try another Gallapoli.

Wrong war. We all grow with age. Beside. Would “peace in our time” be betterr?

38 posted on 02/10/2014 2:38:52 PM PST by Vaquero (Don't pick a fight with an old guy. If he is too old to fight, he'll just kill you.)
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