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LA Crews Aim For Largest Continuous Concrete Pour
AP) ^ | February 15, 2014 12:53 PM

Posted on 02/15/2014 5:09:06 PM PST by BenLurkin

The marathon concrete pour begins Saturday evening and is expected to last 20 hours without interruption. The attempt will be verified by an official from Guinness World Records.

About 2,000 truckloads of concrete will be driven throughout the weekend to the construction site in downtown LA where a skyscraper called the New Wilshire Grand will be built.

... For the past several months, crews have prepared the site by digging an 18-foot-deep pit and lining it with 7 million pounds of reinforcing steel. They will then add 84 million pounds of concrete.

Because the concrete must be poured within 90 minutes of being mixed, trucks must arrive on time. In case of freeway jams, alternate routes have been mapped.

(Excerpt) Read more at losangeles.cbslocal.com ...


TOPICS: Local News
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 02/15/2014 5:09:06 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

Hell, yeah! Good luck, and let’s rock!


2 posted on 02/15/2014 5:10:47 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: BenLurkin

I just saw that o the news and thought oh boy time for some pretty bad mixs ad 40 more at the site


3 posted on 02/15/2014 5:11:49 PM PST by al baby (Hi MomÂ… I was refereeing to Obama)
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To: BenLurkin

I sense that spmebody will be making a time lapse video of this extravaganza!

Thanks!


4 posted on 02/15/2014 5:11:54 PM PST by MeshugeMikey ("When you meet the unbelievers, strike at their necks..." -- Qur'an 47:4)
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To: BenLurkin
LA Crews Aim For Largest Continuous Concrete Pour

Misleading title Alert!!
The word "building" qualifier is sorely missing.

There are more than a few existing concrete arch dams worldwide which easily exceed this pour.

5 posted on 02/15/2014 5:14:20 PM PST by publius911 ( At least Nixon had the good g race to resign!)
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To: BenLurkin
What did Jim Bowie say to Davy Crockett at the Alamo the morning of the Mexican Army attack?

"What gives Davey, we pouring concrete today?"

6 posted on 02/15/2014 5:15:23 PM PST by central_va (I won't be reconstructed and I do not give a damn.)
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To: 1rudeboy; BenLurkin

they paved paradise and put up a parking lot


7 posted on 02/15/2014 5:18:23 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: BenLurkin

Might see a surge of Missing Persons....

Oh wait, it’s not Chicago


8 posted on 02/15/2014 5:18:43 PM PST by C210N (When people fear government there is tyranny; when government fears people there is liberty)
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To: BenLurkin

What about Hoover dam? Was that not considered continuous?


9 posted on 02/15/2014 5:20:48 PM PST by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: publius911

ah, but were they continuous?


10 posted on 02/15/2014 5:21:44 PM PST by NonValueAdded (It's not the penalty, it's the lack of coverage on 1 Jan. Think about it.)
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To: BenLurkin

Fast pours are catastrophes waiting to happen. I have seen formwork for walls buckle and bow multiple times by flowing in concrete faster than they were designed for... The pressure is greater as the aggregate is not locked together and the concrete behaves like a fluid. A very DENSE fluid.

The ties through the concrete snap and nothing is holding the inside and outside forms together. Rut roh!

Slow, even pours placing the concrete in lifts all along the structure while vibrating it with a donkey pecker as you go... that is the best route.

Good luck.


11 posted on 02/15/2014 5:23:20 PM PST by Rodamala
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To: smokingfrog
What about Hoover dam? Was that not considered continuous?

No it wasn't. The Hoover Dam was poured in multi ton block increments. Faster heat dissipation and quicker curing time.

I don't believe this current pour will set up in two weeks. Two months...maybe.

12 posted on 02/15/2014 5:27:20 PM PST by Focault's Pendulum (I live in NJ....' Nuff said!)
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To: bigheadfred
Once finished, the skyscraper will soar 1,100 feet, making it the tallest structure west of the Mississippi. It will boast a 900-room hotel, convention space and offices. There also will be an outdoor terrace and a swimming pool on the 73rd floor.

An 1,100 foot skyscraper in middle of earthquake country. What could go wrong?

13 posted on 02/15/2014 5:30:22 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: Focault's Pendulum

How do they keep it from getting too hot?


14 posted on 02/15/2014 5:31:34 PM PST by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: BenLurkin
An 1,100 foot skyscraper in middle of earthquake country. What could go wrong?

you are automatically enrolled in obamacare when you pay for your room

15 posted on 02/15/2014 5:32:38 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: Focault's Pendulum

I’ve heard that the Hoover Dam will continue to cure for another 45 years.


16 posted on 02/15/2014 5:42:21 PM PST by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: BenLurkin
An 1,100 foot skyscraper in middle of earthquake country. What could go wrong?

Precisely. Bump.

17 posted on 02/15/2014 5:44:31 PM PST by upchuck (Stop this abuse now! Get behind Convention of States: http://bit.ly/1ak1Iz9)
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To: publius911

Right!

My first thought was, “What about Hoover Dam?!”


18 posted on 02/15/2014 5:44:41 PM PST by BwanaNdege
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To: BenLurkin

And parking for 60 vehicles.


19 posted on 02/15/2014 5:49:03 PM PST by Two Kids' Dad (((( 0bama's words are the distraction to the destruction ))))
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To: Two Kids' Dad

Sounds like it will make for a good reef after the big one hits.


20 posted on 02/15/2014 5:59:52 PM PST by EQAndyBuzz (Insurgent Conservative)
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To: smokingfrog

water.


21 posted on 02/15/2014 6:00:25 PM PST by Focault's Pendulum (I live in NJ....' Nuff said!)
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22 posted on 02/15/2014 6:05:18 PM PST by RedMDer (Happy with this, America? Make your voices heard. 2014 is just around the corner. ~ Sarah Palin)
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To: Focault's Pendulum

Additives can be mixed into the concrete to give a fast-high cure. This greatly increases to initial cure rate although it does take the same amount of time to achieve final cure. In addition, you can use a higher strength concrete so that you can more rapidly get to a required strength needed for ongoing construction tasks.


23 posted on 02/15/2014 6:09:59 PM PST by Hootowl99
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To: publius911
There are more than a few existing concrete arch dams worldwide which easily exceed this pour.

Dam few, if any, were continuous pour, though.

24 posted on 02/15/2014 6:45:25 PM PST by John Valentine (Deep in the Heart of Texas)
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To: smokingfrog

Hoover Dam? No way, Jose. Many many individual pours.


25 posted on 02/15/2014 6:46:20 PM PST by John Valentine (Deep in the Heart of Texas)
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To: BenLurkin
When I was about 7, the company my dad work for supplied the concrete for what's now the Aon Center tower; currently the 2nd tallest building in L.A.. It also has a huge foundation. Dad took me to see the job site during the pour. We were down in the pit at night and it was just surreal. Between the work lights and the walls of the pit, you couldn't see anything beyond the expanse of rebar. And it wasn't just the views out toward the edges of the pit that were disorienting, it was the view down. We were walking on the rebar and you couldn't really see how far down it went. It was like being on another planet.
26 posted on 02/15/2014 6:49:25 PM PST by Redcloak (Was that the primary buffer panel?)
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To: Redcloak

I remember when the fire happened. IIRC the building came very close to being destroyed by failure of the steel, but fortunately LAFD was able to control the blaze in time.


27 posted on 02/15/2014 7:02:58 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: BenLurkin

Respectfully, they have pretty much mastered how to build skyscrapers in SoCal that withstand quakes. I was in one, in 1990 during a seismic event, it shook like crazy, but no damage. They are built on gigantic rollers. You may recall the ‘94 event in Northridge. Most of the fatalities were in a three story apartment building. There were freeway collapses, the scoreboard at Anaheim Stadium tumbled into the seats, damage occurred as far as 80 miles from the epicenter, and it was felt in Las Vegas, nearly 300 miles away. None of the high rise buildings in the zone were catastrophically damaged.


28 posted on 02/15/2014 7:08:12 PM PST by jttpwalsh
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To: BenLurkin

“All concrete can crack.” - My Contractor

“All motorcycles can catch on fire.” - Me


29 posted on 02/15/2014 7:09:27 PM PST by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: BenLurkin
Way back, in my college days, I had a Summer construction job as a laborer. One day we had a concrete pour of 450 cubic yards that took about 9 hours to accomplish. It was great because we worked through lunch and overtime, a nice payday.
Back then a truck could carry about 9 cubic yards. The trucks were lined up, dropped their load, went back to the plant and returned. What a day! The job was a power plant on an island South of Norwalk, CT in 1958.
I wonder, how many yards were poured on this job?
30 posted on 02/15/2014 7:13:11 PM PST by BatGuano (You don't think I'd go into combat with loose change in my pocket, do ya?)
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To: jttpwalsh
Respectfully, they have pretty much mastered how to build skyscrapers in SoCal that withstand quakes.

Uh oh....A skyscraper!!!!

lol..

Some of these people seem rather medieval when it comes to skyscrapers. The west coast has many highrises and they've been up for many decades....Trying to recall the last time a skyscraper fell down in CA.

31 posted on 02/15/2014 7:18:57 PM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: dragnet2

I can understand the sentiment, that was my opinion, when I first moved out here, but, as you posted, the facts say otherwise :)


32 posted on 02/15/2014 7:23:20 PM PST by jttpwalsh
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To: smokingfrog

Not sure if it was continuous or not, it was poured in triangular sections with cooling pipes running through it to draw off the heat of curring.


33 posted on 02/15/2014 7:28:21 PM PST by dalereed
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To: BenLurkin

There have been many longer duration continuous concrete pours but I know of none larger.


34 posted on 02/15/2014 7:40:33 PM PST by Real Cynic No More (Border Fence Obamacare!)
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To: BenLurkin

Does anybody know what, if any, are the benefits of a continuous pour of concrete? Any drawbacks?


35 posted on 02/15/2014 7:40:59 PM PST by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
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To: Auntie Mame

I don’t but one of the knowledgeable FReepers who have replied on this thread may.


36 posted on 02/15/2014 7:43:01 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: BenLurkin

“An 1,100 foot skyscraper in middle of earthquake country. What could go wrong?”

The tallest building in the San Fernando Valley is the 506 foot tall 10 Universal City Plaza skyscraper. It weathered the San Fernando Valley earthquakes wery well on the shock absorbers and rollers built into its foundation for earthquake resistance.


37 posted on 02/15/2014 7:56:58 PM PST by WhiskeyX ( provides a system for registering complaints about unfair broadcasters and the ability to request a)
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To: Auntie Mame

Certain types of buildings are more suited to a giant mat slab or single deep mass foundation due to the surrounding soils or the mass of the structure above.

Those characteristics lead to a placement like this — one giant mass of reinforced concrete. It has no seams or joints leading to a place where the segments would have to transfer forces, instead it is all one giant mass performing as a unit. The reinforcing makes it work as a single unit — think of a hammer head — an item cast that takes forces and transmits them as a whole.

That outlines the benefits. The drawbacks are that such a placement takes a very long time to reach its design strength. A footing, wall, beam or slab is typically designed for its cured strength at 28 days. It does continue to chemically cure and develop crystalline structure past that point, but most of the curing has occurred by that point. A giant mass placement (or pour if you will) stays slowing curing in the center for an extremely long time, months to take full load and years for the ultimate curve to be reached.

Dangers are batch plant failures, design mix mistakes or equipment failures in delivery or in the pumps that distribute it. Usually a number of plants are involved in the supply for just that reason. A fire on the only highway leading to a job sight can cause entire loads to be delayed and wasted and the placement to begin to set without supply to keep the placement underway as a single mass.

Can you imagine a placement where the batch plant calls in the middle and says, “we have found some of our trucks used to supply aggregate to the batch plant were used to haul soy beans and we have contaminated some of the loads of mixed concrete with soy beans — STOP the pour!!!” Such things have happened — that comes from a project where I knew the superintendent — he destroyed his cell phone he took the call on by throwing it at a wall.


38 posted on 02/15/2014 8:01:11 PM PST by KC Burke (Officially since Memorial Day they are the Gimmie-crat Party.ha)
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To: Focault's Pendulum
The Hoover Dam was poured in multi ton block increments. Faster heat dissipation and quicker curing time.

I don't believe this current pour will set up in two weeks. Two months...maybe.

Right about the interlocking blocks but I rather doubt that breaking up the pour into increments had much effect on heat dissipation or curing time. The design of the dam included miles of iron pipe which was placed in the cubical forms. The pipes are connected together and to an extremely large refrigeration plant which supplies the pipe network with water at near freezing temperatures. There is also a network of thermocouples (heat sensors) throughout the mass of concrete. The current temperature is about half of what it was when the pouring was finished. It is estimated that the structure will reach thermal equilibrium about 300 years after the concrete work was complete.

I had the chance to take the ten dollar tour about 12 years ago. They took us into places the public seldom sees on the three dollar tour. We were allowed to walk out to the canyon rock face and see the seepage creeping along the rock face and concrete boundary. We also went below the generator gallery floor to see the operating turbines. I would think that the security people no longer allow public entry into those places.

Regards,
GtG

PS I'll never forget the time I spent on that tour, quite the thrill for an old mechanical engineer. That was a unique Federal project in that it came in under budget, ahead of schedule, and it has sold enough power to pay for itself many times over.

39 posted on 02/15/2014 8:52:20 PM PST by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: Rodamala

I know about vibrating the casting to take out the air pockets. Do they do this with a fast pour? (I’m an electrical engineer, not a civil). I have seen the results of not vibrating the forms while working on a water treatment plant. All the resulting voids made for a lot of leaks.


40 posted on 02/15/2014 9:16:19 PM PST by Fred Hayek (The Democratic Party is now the operational arm of the CPUSA)
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To: KC Burke

Thank you, KC, very interesting.


41 posted on 02/16/2014 5:08:45 AM PST by Auntie Mame (Fear not tomorrow. God is already there.)
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