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Wilshire Grand Breaks Record For Largest Concrete Pour
CBSLA.com) ^ | February 16, 2014 1:00 PM

Posted on 02/16/2014 4:31:57 PM PST by BenLurkin

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — Developers made history Sunday at the site of the former Wilshire Grand hotel in downtown Los Angeles.

Adjudicator for the Guinness Book of World Records Michael Empric announced just after 11:30 a.m. that workers had broken the world record for the longest continuous pour.

The Wilshire Grand has a largest pour of 21,200 cubic yard, which is a new Guinness World Records title,” Empric said.

The Associated Press reports that the concrete pour of 82 million pounds of concrete lasted over 18 hours. The concrete was poured into a massive pit in order to build the foundation for the much-anticipated, 73-story tower.

“It’s a symbol of a Los Angeles that’s coming back,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Saturday. “It’s putting the recession in the rear-view mirror, creating jobs.”

Along with breaking the world record, planners had also expected to save funds due to the consecutive pouring as opposed to taking breaks in between.

The $1 billion project includes office space, restaurants, retail, and 900 hotel rooms.

The hotel is scheduled to open in 2017.


TOPICS: Local News
KEYWORDS:
Follow up to yesterday's story
1 posted on 02/16/2014 4:31:57 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

Hoover dam was bigger, and it was continuous.


2 posted on 02/16/2014 4:33:57 PM PST by SampleMan (Feral Humans are the refuse of socialism.)
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To: BenLurkin
73 floors? In LA? Doesn't seem wise.

How would it feel to be that high during an earthquake?

3 posted on 02/16/2014 4:35:42 PM PST by ZOOKER (Until further notice the /s is implied...)
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To: SampleMan

Hoover dam was a lot of separate pours. They allowed the concrete to dry before pouring the next level.


4 posted on 02/16/2014 4:36:46 PM PST by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: driftdiver
82 million lbs (who writes this stuff ... I thought concrete was measured in yards ... ) of FOOTER ... big deal.

The vibrators had the biggest and hardest job

Now ... if they were going to pour 73 stories of WALL ... now THERE'S a Guiness World Book of Record !!

5 posted on 02/16/2014 4:41:38 PM PST by knarf (I say things that are true .. I have no proof .. but they're true.)
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To: knarf

OOPS ... write (pun intended) in front of my eyes ... 21,200 yds


6 posted on 02/16/2014 4:42:57 PM PST by knarf (I say things that are true .. I have no proof .. but they're true.)
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To: ZOOKER

A whole lotta shakin’ goin’ on.


7 posted on 02/16/2014 4:43:13 PM PST by Army Air Corps (Four Fried Chickens and a Coke)
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To: driftdiver

“Hoover dam was a lot of separate pours.”

They had to keep stopping to fish bodies out:-)


8 posted on 02/16/2014 4:44:11 PM PST by babygene ( .)
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To: babygene

“They had to keep stopping to fish bodies out:-)”

I’m not certain that they actually did fish the bodies out.


9 posted on 02/16/2014 4:48:28 PM PST by The Antiyuppie ("When small men cast long shadows, then it is very late in the day.")
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To: The Antiyuppie

As I recall reading about the building of the dam, they became part of the foundation.


10 posted on 02/16/2014 4:50:40 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: BenLurkin

That’s a lot of kickbacks.


11 posted on 02/16/2014 4:52:15 PM PST by umgud (2A can't survive dem majorities)
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To: ZOOKER

The following is a excerpt from a previous post.
**//excerpt begin/

73 floors? In LA? Doesn’t seem wise.

How would it feel to be that high during an earthquake?

/excerpt end//**

This been an excerpt from a previous post.

The following is the entire text of my reply

**\begin text\

Cool!

\end text\**

The previous was the entire text of my replay.


12 posted on 02/16/2014 4:58:51 PM PST by ThomasThomas (It is your fault that I blame others for my actions!)
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To: ZOOKER

I’ve seen that hole at 7th and Fig here in downtown L.A (the better part of DT LA). Didn’t dawn on me that construction for the building required that much amount but I think the building is just to top the opposite building across it.


13 posted on 02/16/2014 5:04:04 PM PST by max americana (fired liberals in our company last election, and I laughed while they cried (true story))
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To: onedoug; stylecouncilor

ping


14 posted on 02/16/2014 5:04:13 PM PST by windcliff
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To: BenLurkin
21,200 yards in 18 hours.

1,177 yards per hour.

118 trucks an hour.

looks like they have 11 boom pumps.

107 cy per pump per hour.

that's dumping some concrete.

if they were pouring a 4" thick driveway that would be 1,696,000 SF.

15 posted on 02/16/2014 5:11:52 PM PST by Doomonyou (Let them eat Lead.)
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To: BenLurkin

73 stories in one of the most seismically active places in America??

Kinda scary, if you ask me.


16 posted on 02/16/2014 5:13:40 PM PST by Windflier (To anger a conservative, tell him a lie. To anger a liberal, tell him the truth.)
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To: BenLurkin

It was always my understanding that if you pour too much concrete at once the heat would make it take forever to set. I read the reason they poured the Hoover Dam in sections is that if they had poured it all at once it would still be curing today. I imagine concrete has gotten better in the last 80 years but I would think the general principle woudl still be the same


17 posted on 02/16/2014 5:22:45 PM PST by RightOnTheBorder
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To: SampleMan

That’s what I was wondering. Certainly the dam couldn’t have been continuous from bottom to top, could it? How would the bottom of the forms withstood the concreto-static pressure till it cured? I’d have assumed they’d pour it like a layer cake in maybe 20-foot layers. Even if it wasn’t, I could still see single pours bigger than this one. But how would Guinness have missed such an obvious one? And what about 3-gorges dam in China? That one’s immense.


18 posted on 02/16/2014 5:31:19 PM PST by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: ThomasThomas

http://www.johnspeedie.com/healy/saywhat.wav


19 posted on 02/16/2014 5:31:26 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: Jonty30; babygene; The Antiyuppie
There are no bodies in the dam. Each pour was only a matter of inches at a time. If someone would have slipped and fallen down, they would have been able to easily stand up or coworkers could have easily helped them.

A body would a been a problem with structural integrity.

20 posted on 02/16/2014 5:35:15 PM PST by mountn man (The Pleasure You Get From Life Is Equal To The Attitude You Put Into It)
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To: RightOnTheBorder

I understand from both civil engineers and concrete companies that all concrete indeed cures forever.

But for max. strength, it has to cure a certain percentage, and that can be delayed with too large a pour......


21 posted on 02/16/2014 5:37:27 PM PST by Arlis
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To: mountn man

I can’t believe they did pours in inches at a time. Sheesh, they’d still be pouring the thing today. I’m thinking more like 10 or 20 ft of height at a time. Reasonable balance of required form strength and progress rate.


22 posted on 02/16/2014 5:39:41 PM PST by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: max americana

7th and Fig? They didn’t tear out The Pantry, did they? Great restaurant. My uncle tiled the place.


23 posted on 02/16/2014 5:46:37 PM PST by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: Still Thinking

I think The Pantry is at about 4th or 5th, isn’t it?


24 posted on 02/16/2014 5:47:12 PM PST by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: BenLurkin
This building is 1,100 tall and is being constructed in earthquake country. Hello??
25 posted on 02/16/2014 5:48:00 PM PST by upchuck (Stop this abuse now! Get behind Convention of States: http://bit.ly/1ak1Iz9)
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To: RightOnTheBorder

Actually, the damn concrete IS STILL curing.


26 posted on 02/16/2014 5:49:09 PM PST by mountn man (The Pleasure You Get From Life Is Equal To The Attitude You Put Into It)
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To: RightOnTheBorder
It was always my understanding that if you pour too much concrete at once the heat would make it take forever to set. I read the reason they poured the Hoover Dam in sections is that if they had poured it all at once it would still be curing today.

They used cooling pipes and pumped chilled water through them. They also poured the concrete in sections. Supposedly the concrete is still curing.

27 posted on 02/16/2014 5:49:41 PM PST by Moonman62 (The US has become a government with a country, rather than a country with a government.)
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To: Still Thinking; mountn man
You can see the men inside the forms.

Looks to be at least 6-8' high.

 photo hoover.jpg

28 posted on 02/16/2014 5:49:56 PM PST by digger48
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To: Still Thinking

According to wikipedia regarding Hoover Dam: “Concrete cores were removed from the dam for testing in 1995; they showed that ‘Hoover Dam’s concrete has continued to slowly gain strength’.” So, it seems to still be curing. I’ve read that somewhere else.


29 posted on 02/16/2014 5:50:01 PM PST by tenger (It's a good thing we don't get all the government we pay for. -Will Rogers)
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To: SampleMan

And because when concrete sets up, its an exothermic ( heat producing) process, deep inside Hoover it’s still HOT. The dam actually has hundreds of miles of piping inside the concrete..water runs through it to cool it..


30 posted on 02/16/2014 5:50:58 PM PST by ken5050 (This space available cheap...)
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To: Still Thinking

Pantry Is 9th and Fig


31 posted on 02/16/2014 5:52:30 PM PST by ThomasThomas (Is it legal to wire tape the NSA phones?)
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To: Still Thinking; mountn man

“...concrete blocks in columns were poured, some as large as 50 feet (15 m) square and 5 feet (1.5 m) high. Each five-foot form contained a series of 1 inch (25 mm) steel pipes through which first cool river water, then ice-cold water from a refrigeration plant was run. Once an individual block had cured and had stopped contracting, the pipes were filled with grout.”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoover_Dam


32 posted on 02/16/2014 5:54:08 PM PST by digger48
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To: upchuck

Look at the bright side: If it comes down, lots and lots of ‘Rats are gonna get squished.


33 posted on 02/16/2014 5:54:12 PM PST by Trod Upon (Every penny given to film and TV media companies goes right into enemy coffers. Starve them out!)
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To: Still Thinking

I think that’s now called Engine No 28, and it’s right after you get off the subway or Red Line. If that’s it, then it’s still there.


34 posted on 02/16/2014 5:54:36 PM PST by max americana (fired liberals in our company last election, and I laughed while they cried (true story))
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To: upchuck

When the Big One hits — some water is likely to get sloshed out of that 73rd floor pool.


35 posted on 02/16/2014 5:58:28 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: Still Thinking
The buckets they used to transport the concrete was 4 or 8 yd dump buckets. The concrete was a very dry mix and had a very short set up time. If the crane operators were too slow, the concrete could set up in the bucket. For this reason, the operators were the highest paid workers, ensuring they had the best. 7 "puddlers" with shovels, would then scoop and push the concrete around and men with vibrators would vibrate out the voids.
By the time another bucket would arrive, the previous concrete pour would already be setting.
36 posted on 02/16/2014 6:04:15 PM PST by mountn man (The Pleasure You Get From Life Is Equal To The Attitude You Put Into It)
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To: digger48
The buckets containing concrete were 4 to 8 yds. 8 yds= 216 cu ft

If each area is, lets say 20' x 20', that's 400 sq ft. That means each bucket would drop 6" of concrete.

37 posted on 02/16/2014 6:11:24 PM PST by mountn man (The Pleasure You Get From Life Is Equal To The Attitude You Put Into It)
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To: Still Thinking

The Pantry is a block south of there — was still in business several years ago.


38 posted on 02/16/2014 6:13:02 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: mountn man

I wasn’t disagreeing.

with all the rebar and cooling pipe and only dropping in 8 yd at a time, It would have been near impossible for someone to get poured over


39 posted on 02/16/2014 6:17:53 PM PST by digger48
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To: mountn man

Oh yeah, inches per bucket load, sure. I was talking about the depth of concrete that would be liquid at one time.


40 posted on 02/16/2014 6:20:07 PM PST by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: RightOnTheBorder
It was always my understanding that if you pour too much concrete at once the heat would make it take forever to set.

the heat of hydration actually makes the concrete set faster. It also makes it expand too much and crack. The heat is a problem with thick structures.

41 posted on 02/16/2014 6:41:14 PM PST by LoneRangerMassachusetts (The meek shall not inherit the Earth)
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To: Windflier

Actually, some of the tallest buildings in San Francisco and LA have the greatest structural integrity thanks to isolation pads and dampers as part of their design, which most older masonry buildings lack.

When my friend put an addition on his West LA house, the addition was built on an isolation pad and expansion joints were designed to allow for lateral movement. He got me an invitation to see the dampers in one of the LA skyscrapers and meet with one of the structural engineers. Even the plumbing and electrical allow for severe vertical and lateral changes. As an architect I would feel more comfortable in that skyscraper than most of the old multi-family apartment buildings in LA.

Many years ago, I visited a temple in Kyoto that has withstood numerous earthquakes since being built 400 years ago. There wasn’t a single nail or spike in the structure nor any mortar or grout. All the walls were connected to a central support, allowing for severe lateral movement - pretty amazing.


42 posted on 02/16/2014 6:44:18 PM PST by 12Gauge687
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To: Still Thinking
Oh yeah, inches per bucket load, sure. I was talking about the depth of concrete that would be liquid at one time.

Well, if they were worried about concrete setting up in the bucket, I'd imagine within a few buckets poured, that the first bucket would start setting up.

Also, rebar would have to be set in place, as well as cooling pipes. So, I imagine they might only do a couple of feet a day per cube. But I really don't know.

43 posted on 02/16/2014 6:50:07 PM PST by mountn man (The Pleasure You Get From Life Is Equal To The Attitude You Put Into It)
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To: The Antiyuppie

Most of the time it is impossible to get the body out when someone falls into a large live pour such as they would do on a dam. 20 to 25 cubic yards or more in one dump is a lot of concrete to be trying to fish out a corpse from.


44 posted on 02/16/2014 6:55:22 PM PST by B4Ranch (Name your illness, do a Google & YouTube search with "hydrogen peroxide". Do it and be surprised.)
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To: Slump Tester

Lots of fun.


45 posted on 02/16/2014 6:59:42 PM PST by Rebelbase (Tagline: optional, printed after your name on post)
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To: mountn man

“There are no bodies in the dam.”

But, but , but... There was a song about it.

I was a dam builder across the river deep and wide
Where steel and water did collide
A place called Boulder on the wild Colorado
I slipped and fell into the wet concrete below
They buried me in that great tomb that knows no sound
But I am still around..I’ll always be around..and around and around and
around and around


46 posted on 02/16/2014 6:59:44 PM PST by babygene ( .)
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To: upchuck

Respectfully, they have pretty much mastered how to build skyscrapers in SoCal that withstand quakes. I was in one, in 1990 during a seismic event, it shook like crazy, but no damage. They are built on gigantic rollers. You may recall the ‘94 event in Northridge. Most of the fatalities were in a three story apartment building. There were freeway collapses, the scoreboard at Anaheim Stadium tumbled into the seats, damage occurred as far as 80 miles from the epicenter, and it was felt in Las Vegas, nearly 300 miles away. None of the high rise buildings in the zone were catastrophically damaged.


47 posted on 02/16/2014 8:44:44 PM PST by jttpwalsh
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To: The Antiyuppie

When the light hits the face of the dam just right.... you can make out the impressions of the faces....
Really.
http://tinyurl.com/m57xu66


48 posted on 02/16/2014 9:03:15 PM PST by minnesota_bound
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To: RightOnTheBorder

Hoover dam serendipitously utilized non-reactive aggregate in the mix, and that concrete turned out to be just about some of the best concrete you could make, even to today’s standards.


49 posted on 02/16/2014 9:22:03 PM PST by Axenolith (Government blows, and that which governs least, blows least...)
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