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Any Freepers who have had gall bladder surgery?
Feb 20, 2014 | Me

Posted on 02/20/2014 9:04:16 AM PST by taxcontrol

I just did a 3 day stint in the hospital for Pancreatitis which may be caused by gall stones. The doctor recommends that I get my gall bladder and the gall stones removed. Considering that I have good insurance, I am going to go through the procedure.


TOPICS: Chit/Chat; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: gallbladder; gallbladdersurgery; surgery
So my questions to my fellow Freepers is simply this, what should I expect? What can I do to help my recovery? Any other recommendations or considerations?
1 posted on 02/20/2014 9:04:16 AM PST by taxcontrol
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To: taxcontrol

Bookmarking this thread...my wife has to undergo the same thing.


2 posted on 02/20/2014 9:08:06 AM PST by ItsOurTimeNow ("Scheming demons dressed in kingly guise, beating down the multitudes and scoffing at the wise.")
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To: taxcontrol

Had mine removed with three very small incisions. Apparently took 45 minutes. Awoke blissful from Propofol. I had zero post operative pain but spent three days at home recupurating and taking vicodin.
Easy.


3 posted on 02/20/2014 9:08:58 AM PST by daniel boob (TEA Party Patriot)
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To: taxcontrol

I did the gall bladder flush at home. Passed all gallstones. Subsequent test showed I had none. This was 16 years ago and I still have my God-given, functioning gall bladder with no problems.

I would never have gall bladder surgery myself. It sets you up for a life of poor fat digestion - despite what doctors tell you. According to them, the gall bladder is unnecessary. God, apparently had parts left over and doled them out to fill the extra space in the human abdomen.

BTW, it cost me a total of about $8 to treat at home. I’ve also had a sister do it successfully and two other friends. Same result for us all.

... but that’s us. You will have to make your own decision.


4 posted on 02/20/2014 9:09:54 AM PST by aMorePerfectUnion
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To: taxcontrol

I had gaul bladder surgery a few years ago. There was no other complications so my experience might be different.

The surgeon did it as an outpatient procedure. He cut three slots about 3/4 inch long and removed the gaul bladder through one of them. There were no complications and I went home within a couple of hours.

I just took it easy for a couple of days and healed rapidly. The 3 cuts were closed by staples and they were removed in maybe a week. All in all a piece of cake.

They do put you under tho. When I awoke the surgeon was sitting beside me and he explained that everything went fine.


5 posted on 02/20/2014 9:10:13 AM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: taxcontrol

... forgot two things...

1. Good luck, whatever you decide.
2. If I can help steer you to info, please pm me.


6 posted on 02/20/2014 9:11:58 AM PST by aMorePerfectUnion
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To: taxcontrol
Usually it is a simple procedure(unduly expensive by the way)I have noticed no ill effects from the removal of my gall bladder. If your surgeon is conservative you may stay overnight for observation. If you had inflammation of the pancreas do the gall bladder surgery NOW!

There are risks from any surgery which your physician will explain, such risky events rarely occur.

7 posted on 02/20/2014 9:12:28 AM PST by AEMILIUS PAULUS (It is a shame that when these people give a riot)
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To: taxcontrol

I didn’t have the surgery, but both my husband and son did. It is an outpatient procedure, now. Do it. Pancreatitis will return, you can count on it. It is very serious and painful, as you know.


8 posted on 02/20/2014 9:14:45 AM PST by Eva
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To: aMorePerfectUnion

What did you use for a gall bladder flush?


9 posted on 02/20/2014 9:15:08 AM PST by Tired of Taxes
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To: taxcontrol

These days they can remove the gallbladder “laparoscopically”, meaning they just make very tiny incisions. Be sure that is how they plan to do it.

This also leads to less stress on the system and a faster recovery of maybe a couple of weeks, instead of some 6 weeks recovery after a “traditional” surgery, the way they used to do it in the old days.

Laparoscopic surgery has been around for quite a while, as in quite a few years, so it’s a fully accepted procedure and many if not most surgeons are proficient in performing it.

Here is some info from WebMD.

http://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/laparoscopic-gallbladder-surgery-for-gallstones

I recommend you discuss it with your doctor and make sure to have the surgery laparoscopically, it is performed under general anesthesia and would also recommend you discuss with your doctor to stay in the hospital at least a day or two — at WebMD they say it could be performed so they send you home the same day, I think you should stay in the hospital to make sure everything is fine, before they send you home.

Good luck — there is nothing to be concerned about.


10 posted on 02/20/2014 9:16:04 AM PST by Innovative ("Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." -- Vince Lombardi)
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To: taxcontrol

It’s really not bad, as far as surgeries go. Your abdomen will be covered in bruises and you’ll look like you swallowed a basketball until the gas goes away. No big incisions, no real pain- just discomfort from being inflated. You’ll probably get liquids and soup for a couple days and work your way back to normal food. You might find that grease doesn’t quite agree with you the way that it once did.


11 posted on 02/20/2014 9:17:54 AM PST by SoKatt ("Change" is not a strategy!)
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To: aMorePerfectUnion; taxcontrol

Glad to hear that your gallbladder flush worked out.

But if the gallstones are large and there are many of them, it may not work.

Gallbladder surgery these days is pretty safe and straight forward.

The notion that you can’t eat fatty foods after your gallbladder is removed is a myth.


12 posted on 02/20/2014 9:19:16 AM PST by Innovative ("Winning isn't everything, it's the only thing." -- Vince Lombardi)
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To: Tired of Taxes

http://www.quackwatch.com/01QuackeryRelatedTopics/flushes.html


13 posted on 02/20/2014 9:19:49 AM PST by Dick Vomer (democrats are like flies, whatever they don't eat they sh#t on.)
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To: taxcontrol

My Mom landed up in the ER with pancreatitus several years ago. They took her gall bladder out with the new less invasive procedure and she went home the same day. Three little puncture holes and they just sucked out the gall bladder and in a few days she was fine.


14 posted on 02/20/2014 9:20:06 AM PST by Georgia Girl 2 (The only purpose of a pistol is to fight your way back to the rifle you should never have dropped.)
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To: aMorePerfectUnion

True about the digestion. Mine is not the same but at the time, my gallbladder was inflamed & needed removal ASAP.
Wish I would have known about the flush, I’ve always had a tempermental stomach & didn’t realize was gallstones until too late.
Had mine done 5yrs ago, outpatient & recovery was more soreness than pain. Was home same day & few days for recovery. Have tiny scars from the laparoscopic surgery & yes, anesthesia is required.


15 posted on 02/20/2014 9:23:20 AM PST by rainee (Her)
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To: taxcontrol

I had mine removed subsequent to pancreatitis. Beyond a couple secondary infections caused by having so much tissue damaged and killed by the powerful digestive juices spilled into my gut by the ruptured pancreas, no problems, no life lifestyle changes needed.

Simple operation, 3, maybe 4, 1 inch scars (can’t find mine to count...)


16 posted on 02/20/2014 9:27:43 AM PST by null and void (<--- unwilling cattle-car passenger on the bullet train to serfdom)
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To: taxcontrol

I had mine removed in 2005. Basically I was so sick and throwing up that my wife took me to ER. They admitted me and scheduled the surgery for the next day. They put me out and did laproscopic surgery to remove the gall bladder. After that they leave a drainage tube in you to drain out what’s left inside. I was in the hospital a couple of days as I recall. Then I was released to go home still with the drainage tube stuck in my side. I had to go back about a week later to have the drainage tube yanked out. Yeah, you heard it right, yanked out. That felt like a kick in the gut. When it was over it healed up and now I just have some small scars. No problems since then with that.


17 posted on 02/20/2014 9:29:24 AM PST by fulltlt
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To: aMorePerfectUnion
According to them, the gall bladder is unnecessary.

LOL, Mine said the same thing.

Everything from snails to whales has a gall bladder, it must serve some crucial function for it to be preserved through so much evolution!

18 posted on 02/20/2014 9:32:01 AM PST by null and void (<--- unwilling cattle-car passenger on the bullet train to serfdom)
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To: taxcontrol

Like the majority here are saying, it is an easy out patient procedure. I was sore for about 24 hours, but lots of pillows and drugs helped a lot.

The only thing that has changed in the last five years is that fat likes hanging around on my body more ~ ‘course that could have something to do with age & lack of exercise.


19 posted on 02/20/2014 9:39:19 AM PST by TheMom (Stressed spelled backwards is Desserts!)
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To: Innovative

“But if the gallstones are large and there are many of them, it may not work.”

Oh, you’d be amazed at the size of what came out! Large and small.

“Gallbladder surgery these days is pretty safe and straight forward.”

Yes. But almost always unnecessary.

“The notion that you can’t eat fatty foods after your gallbladder is removed is a myth.”

You will need added bile salts with each meal to digest them correctly. You will need to be the new gall bladder - or not get correct nutrition.


20 posted on 02/20/2014 9:43:33 AM PST by aMorePerfectUnion
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To: Tired of Taxes

Pm me


21 posted on 02/20/2014 9:44:32 AM PST by aMorePerfectUnion
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To: Dick Vomer

Quack watch is funded by the trade group of the drug companies. The guy in charge is a non-practicing psychiatrist.


22 posted on 02/20/2014 9:46:18 AM PST by aMorePerfectUnion
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To: taxcontrol

My sister just had this done as emergency surgery. She got through it fine, but is still recovering.


23 posted on 02/20/2014 9:47:25 AM PST by CityCenter (Resist Obamacare!)
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To: taxcontrol

My experience:

It was a quick laparoscopic procedure. 3 small holes (like 1/4” punctures) on my upper stomach and a 1” incision on the bottom of my belly-button (where they exited the gall bladder). I have almost no scarring now. If you know right where to look, you can sort of make out the incisions.

1st day was a breeze. No ill effects or discomfort at all.
2nd day was ok. They can’t remove all of the gas/air they put in you and I felt a bit bloated.
3rd day, woke up feeling like I had done a bunch of sit-ups the day before. Not disabling pain, but uncomfortable and I was glad I was home and not travelling.
4th day was like the 1st day and it was done. No more issues after that. I never felt the need to take any pain meds or even a tylenol.

I haven’t had any problems. I was warned I may need to adjust my diet, but I haven’t changed a thing. As far as that goes, they may have given me a glass of water in the hospital instead of the cholesystectomy. I can’t tell any difference before or after.

However, I have a friend who has to take a “Nexium” pill (I think that’s what it’s called) every day after his was removed. He also has to watch what he eats as some types of food mess with him. But, it also doesn’t stop him from eating those foods when he really wants to — he just knows to expect to be gassy afterwards.

Best of luck to you!


24 posted on 02/20/2014 9:51:12 AM PST by jaydee770
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To: taxcontrol

My wife had it done several years ago and she recovered in about a week with minimal pain. However, she can’t eat any greasy foods now, or else she has to make a beeline straight to the bathroom.


25 posted on 02/20/2014 9:51:43 AM PST by Timber Rattler (Just say NO! to RINOS and the GOP-E)
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To: taxcontrol

Piece of cake. Had surgery at 7am went home at 6pm. Haven’t had any symptoms or anything unusual afterwards. Don’t seem to miss it. Good luck.


26 posted on 02/20/2014 9:55:37 AM PST by Rodd OB (24 year Simi Valleyer)
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To: taxcontrol

Been there, done that.

Went in for the doc to scope my gallbladder for stones and sediment before considering an operation. They told me that there was a 10% chance of getting pancreatitis. I won the prize... My gallbladder was so full of stones/sediment that the fluid they used when doing the scope apparently aggravated the pancreas due to stone and sediment blockage. I had to stay in the hospital until the pancreatitis subsided and then had the surgery. They started with the laparoscopic route but when they tried to pull the gallbladder out, it burst and they ended up giving me a 7 inch zipper after cleaning out my insides. Recovery sucked but I have not had another issue since. I realized in the decade or so since the surgery that my gallbladder was likely causing all sorts of problems in previous years which I no longer experience.


27 posted on 02/20/2014 9:55:37 AM PST by NoCoAg
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To: SoKatt

I had gall bladder surgery 40 years ago and things are MUCH better now. Then it was 3.5 hours on the table, in hospital for a week and off work for 6 weeks. Now it is almost an outpatient procedure.

They took 300 small stones out of my body and left me with scars that looked like I lost a sword fight.


28 posted on 02/20/2014 9:55:55 AM PST by Wordkraft (Remember who the Collaborators are.)
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To: taxcontrol

My wife had hers removed a long time ago. The big problem is you’ll need to level out your fatty food intake, the gallbladder is where your body stores excess bile for digesting fat. If you regularly eat a lot of fatty foods your body can handle it by upping production, but if you tend to eat lean your body lowers production then if you suddenly have a fatty meal your body doesn’t have that excess. This makes for unpleasant digestion and post digestion, nothing dangerous just unhappy.


29 posted on 02/20/2014 10:00:08 AM PST by discostu (I don't meme well.)
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To: taxcontrol

Laparoscopic surgery is a breeze. Three small incisions, covered with Band-Aids. You go home the next day with almost no pain and zero restrictions, except for what you can lift for a few weeks. I think it was nothing over 5lbs. You can drive almost immediately too. Oh, while your liver adjusts to taking over the pancreas’s job, food proceeds very rapidly through your system. I lost ten pounds.


30 posted on 02/20/2014 10:03:07 AM PST by Wiser now (Socialism does not eliminate poverty, it guarantees it.)
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To: taxcontrol

Laparoscopic surgery is a breeze. Three small incisions, covered with Band-Aids. You go home the next day with almost no pain and zero restrictions, except for what you can lift for a few weeks. I think it was nothing over 5lbs. You can drive almost immediately too. Oh, while your liver adjusts to taking over the pancreas’s job, food proceeds very rapidly through your system. I lost ten pounds.


31 posted on 02/20/2014 10:03:37 AM PST by Wiser now (Socialism does not eliminate poverty, it guarantees it.)
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To: taxcontrol
Had mine removed in 2008, after several years of increasingly severe gall bladder attacks.

Recovery after the surgery was nothing compared to the gall bladder attacks themselves (which in my case, lasted many hours and were excruciatingly painful). The worst thing following the surgery was the pain I had in my right shoulder, apparently due to the nitrogen (or whatever gas they use) rising from my abdomen. But that only lasted for the first two days, and a couple of Oxycodones or whatever they gave me knocked that right out for 4 hours at a time :-) Other than that, it just felt like I had done way too many sit-ups.

I have had no side effects from the surgery, can eat whatever I want, and do not experience any of the problems some people seem to have with greasy foods, etc.

Cholecystectomy is the most commonly performed operation there is, and it is well worth not having to worry about gall bladder attacks, or the potential for pancreatitis, various cancers, etc., that can result from gallstones in the biliary tract.

32 posted on 02/20/2014 10:06:04 AM PST by Sicon ("All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others." - G. Orwell)
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To: Wordkraft

My Mother had gall bladder surgery back in the early 60s. She actually came close to dying. Even after the surgeon said she was doing fine, she looked almost dead.

All of her children saw her and almost panicked us. We all went to the surgeon and he said she was fine. My oldest Sister did somehow find out that she in fact almost died.

It did make us realize just how much we loved her.


33 posted on 02/20/2014 10:24:23 AM PST by yarddog (Romans 8: verses 38 and 39. "For I am persuaded".)
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To: taxcontrol

Get a second opinion from a gastro specialist. There are many situations when it is not necessary.


34 posted on 02/20/2014 10:26:18 AM PST by kenmcg
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To: kenmcg

I had mine removed laproscopically ten years ago. No problems then or since. I can eat anything...no problems.


35 posted on 02/20/2014 10:33:19 AM PST by hal ogen (First Amendment or Reeducation Camp?)
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To: taxcontrol

Had mine out a month ago. Went in at 6am was home at noon. Not much pain but had a nasty case of hiccups. They gave me a script that fixed that right up. Went back to work the next day but many say I am tougher than most so give your self a few days.

Post removal life has changed a bit. Fatty foods will sometimes pass through after a short visit but that seems to be mellowing out and happening less and less..

Some will say all you have to do is flush your gallbladdder out. I suggest you research this and talk with your doctor. I obviously passed on flushing it.


36 posted on 02/20/2014 10:38:57 AM PST by cableguymn (It's time for a second political party.)
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To: taxcontrol

If it were me, I would avoid that surgery if at all possible... I mean unless it is the only way to save my life.

Otherwise I would use a mixture vinegar, olive oil, lemon juice, and water as a way to dissolve the stones. I know this does work, but I would verify the results medically.

This is NOT medical advice from me to you. I am just sharing an opinion by way of what I would probably do in your situation.


37 posted on 02/20/2014 10:40:30 AM PST by unlearner (You will never come to know that which you do not know until you first know that you do not know it.)
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To: taxcontrol

Mrs. Hugin had gall bladder surgery about 20 years ago. There are two methods. The old fashioned method is to cut open several inches of stomach muscles and open it up. The newer method only requires a couple of small incisions, and the bladder is removed with a laprascope. Mrs. Hugin had the former because she had massive inflammation and the surgeon wanted to see what was going on. It took several weeks to heal up, and was very painful. I’ve talked to people who had the laprascopic surgery and it’s much less of an ordeal.


38 posted on 02/20/2014 10:40:32 AM PST by Hugin
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To: taxcontrol

I felt like one of those balloons in the Thanksgiving day parade the night after the surgery. I never had any significant pain and felt pretty much back to normal in a couple of days.

That being said, after the surgery I had diarrhea every time I ate fatty food and I think that passing all of that unabsorbed fat for years may have caused my colon cancer.

Good luck. Talk to your surgeon about all the risks and benefits.


39 posted on 02/20/2014 10:48:45 AM PST by dangerdoc (I don't think you should be forced to make the same decision I did even if I know I'm right.)
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To: aMorePerfectUnion

Quack watch is funded by the trade group of the drug companies. The guy in charge is a non-practicing psychiatrist.

It was just a source that had citations. If you or a loved on has had pancreatitis or cholangitis I’d recommend having the gallbag removed and an ERCP in order to make sure a stone isn’t lodged in the duct. You can actually die from an infection or complication.

Of course you can chose the cleanse or flush. Free country, etc, etc. your mileage may differ and past results are not indicative of future earnings disclaimer.


40 posted on 02/20/2014 10:53:53 AM PST by Dick Vomer (democrats are like flies, whatever they don't eat they sh#t on.)
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To: AEMILIUS PAULUS

as a nurse for 35 years, if you have to have your GB out, you are living in the right time. When I began my career you could look forward to a week in ICU with tubes in most of your orifices, plus a few u didn’t know you had, a huge belly incision, lots of pain, and a good possibility of dying. Now, we send you home the same day. It is one of the great advances in surgery in my lifetime. I still have my GB, but don’t fear losing it like I used to.
I will give you the advice I give all the patients I send home, WALK, WALK,WALK. Drink plenty of water. Don’t get constipated. from the pain pills.


41 posted on 02/20/2014 11:30:18 AM PST by az wildkitten (8 years 'til I retire)
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To: taxcontrol

I had it done. The surgery was easy. I just have the ‘dumping’ syndrome after the fact/when I eat. I understand that’s not common.

Get up and walk afterwards. It’s not a ‘bad’ surgery at all. Tiny poke holes left is all right afterwards.


42 posted on 02/20/2014 11:33:49 AM PST by combat_boots (The Lion of Judah cometh. Hallelujah. Gloria Patri, Filio et Spiritui Sancto!)
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To: taxcontrol

Be sure to find a surgeon with lots of experience and who would do the procedure either laproscopically or with robotic surgery. Both procedures use only a couple of small incisions. My daughter just had large ovarian cysts removed with robotic surgery and had a quick recovery.


43 posted on 02/20/2014 11:36:43 AM PST by The Great RJ
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To: taxcontrol
I had mine out in 2007 after five months of very bad gall bladder attacks. For several years I had been taking antacids thinking it was heartburn. My internist ordered an ultrasound and that confirmed her diagnosis.

Went into the hospital four days later at 5 A. M. and was on my way home at 4:00 in the afternoon. I had no complications from the laparoscopy, but three weeks later I started feeling like I did before the surgery. Turned out that a single gall stone was stuck at the bottom of the biliary tube which dumps into the small intestine.

I had another outpatient procedure called an endoscopy (in which tiny surgical instruments attached to a tube are inserted through the mouth, wound down through the stomach and the offending gall stone removed with a tiny robotic clamp.) The recovery from the endoscopy took longer than the original laparoscopy.

However, the 35 pounds I lost in the five months leading up to the surgery have not returned and the only thing I have to be careful about is eating too much pasta.

44 posted on 02/20/2014 12:51:34 PM PST by 45Auto (Big holes are (almost) always better.)
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