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Imagine making children illiterate
EdArticle ^ | July 9, 2013 | Bruce Deitrick Price

Posted on 02/20/2014 3:43:06 PM PST by BruceDeitrickPrice

Not all at once, by some surgical procedure.

No, this will be a slow, subtle process, taking place over years. Every step will be conducted with utmost seriousness. Scientific validity will be claimed. Endless research will be constantly referenced.

If there is little progress or outright failure, teachers always seem amazed, as if such a thing had never happened before. Principals explain that the school is doing everything it can, if only parents would help in this delicate training.

Children and families will be told with absolute confidence: we use the best methods here and our students learn to be lifelong readers. Neither assertion is true.

What sort of people could participate in such a charade? How could they come to work each day, observing happy, normal children in the playground, and knowing they will be kept from reaching their full potential?

Learning to read (or learning not to read) is a somewhat technical process. Even if done quickly, it could take almost a year. If done badly, the process simply seems to take longer. Surely next year the child will get it, or the year after that. Meanwhile, elaborate tutoring and remediation services are available. Drugs can be prescribed.

Throughout this entire process, the family never understands what is going on. The children never understand what is being done to them, i.e., they are being made permanently illiterate. They don’t get better. At the same time, they don’t get worse. Never having been literate, they can’t judge the difference. We have millions of children in the third or fourth grade who cannot read appreciably better than when they first got there.

So what has been happening in all those many months and hundreds of hours of instruction? Nothing has been happening, that’s the genius of reading in America (and several other English-speaking countries). Teachers use methods that don’t work. Many teachers may sincerely believe that they are doing the correct thing. That’s an important part of the program’s success. The teachers are brainwashed when they’re at ed school; or they are forced into line by relentless directives from on high. They’re not allowed to pick the curriculum. Nothing changes unless many parents complain. Often as not the school district will choose an equally bad reading program.

We can’t blame much on the teachers, although they should speak up more than they do. You have to look at the top of the education food chain. Look, for example at the professors at Harvard’s Graduate School of Education. Look at superintendents of large districts. These are the people in charge; these are the people making sure that millions of children are not learning to read.

That verdict is a harsh one and makes us uncomfortable. But this pattern goes back to 1930s, when Whole Word was first introduced. It can’t work; and the people in charge had to know it didn’t work. (Phonics is always the correct choice). It’s simpler to understand all our problems if you simply accept this description: the fix was in. Ideologues plotted to make sure that the schools would dumb down children, rather than elevate them. Bogus methods had to be used.

Apparently, they want to control the society. To do this they needed to make everybody dimmer than they are themselves. Quite a challenge for these soulless little technocrats; but they were not deterred. They had billion-dollar budgets and a staff of thousands. All these people were laboring away on further refinements, new marketing copy, clever jargon, in order to sell bad ideas to an overly trusting public.

Possibly they are proud of themselves. They did create 50 million functional illiterates in the US. That’s people who almost without exception could have been taken up another notch or two. But they were, carefully and designedly, kept semi-literate.

It’s fascinating to contemplate people so committed to a cause, so vicious, so oblivious to what they’re doing with their lives, that they would engage in the systematic dumbing down of children. How else can we describe what they did?

Another school year will start soon. Will millions more children be ground down by quackery? Or will the country’s intellectual common sense assert itself?

All that’s necessary for evil education ideas to triumph is for good people to do nothing.

------

See:::"Reading Is Easy.—You have to work to make kids illiterate"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-JV0tPGn-Ws

..


TOPICS: Books/Literature; Business/Economy; Education; Society
KEYWORDS: commoncore; curriculum; dyslexia; learning; phonics; schools; teaching; wholeword

1 posted on 02/20/2014 3:43:07 PM PST by BruceDeitrickPrice
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To: BruceDeitrickPrice

Part of the process was “scientific” racism programming. Lots of people today believe that black or Mexican children can’t learn to read, because they have marginally lower average IQs than white or Asian students. Never mind the fact that practically everyone’s IQ was lower a few generations ago ... when malnutrition was the standard, rather than the exception ... yet, children instructed with phonics learned to read. Children drilled in math facts learned to do arithmetic. Children drilled in penmanship could write.


2 posted on 02/20/2014 3:52:03 PM PST by Tax-chick (The future is not going to take us seriously.)
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To: BruceDeitrickPrice

Public School is Child Abuse. (AKA Government School)


3 posted on 02/20/2014 3:56:40 PM PST by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it, and the Constitution and law mean what WE say.)
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To: Tax-chick
In the 1960's the The Stratemeyer Syndicate had the books in the Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys and other series rewritten. They dropped the number of chapters from 25 to 20 because children wouldn't read such long books anymore.

It is interesting when you read the original and the rewrite and see how much even then schools were failing.

4 posted on 02/20/2014 4:02:12 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: BruceDeitrickPrice

After a few basic lessons in the sounds that letters make, My kids learned to read on the internet for the most part, and read WAY above their age level.


5 posted on 02/20/2014 4:03:13 PM PST by Paradox (Unexpected things coming for the next few years.)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

I’m sure that would be interesting. I didn’t start reading Nancy Drew until the 1970s, and I don’t know how many of those were new versions vs. older ones still on library shelves or in garage sales.


6 posted on 02/20/2014 4:55:22 PM PST by Tax-chick (The future is not going to take us seriously.)
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To: Tax-chick

You won’t realize the huge decline in education until you see textbooks from the early part of the 20th century. Third grade to sixth grade readers had selections from Shakespeare, the Bible, Lincoln, Tennyson, Wordsworth, Rudyard Kipling and other literary giants, now read only by top students in high school and college. Hard to believe but true.


7 posted on 02/20/2014 5:08:30 PM PST by Liberty Wins ( The average lefty is synapse challenged)
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To: BruceDeitrickPrice

Any parent could counter that simply by reading to their children every night. Read books that are above the child’s reading level, so they can HEAR proper language, and explain words that they may not know; THAT will increase vocabulary. Then have them read to YOU so they’ll have more practice. Get them a Library Card and USE it, or, if you have a Kindle, download lots of books for them.


8 posted on 02/20/2014 5:11:31 PM PST by SuziQ
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To: BruceDeitrickPrice
We have millions of children in the third or fourth grade who cannot read appreciably better than when they first got there.

Malpractice. Nothing simpler than phonics. I am not a "credentialed" teacher but taught two of my tykes to read... with phonics. We didn't even finish the book and they "got it" and took off reading.

9 posted on 02/20/2014 5:12:55 PM PST by Lizavetta
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To: BruceDeitrickPrice

Evil.


10 posted on 02/20/2014 5:40:18 PM PST by Talisker (One who commands, must obey.)
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To: Tax-chick

bttt


11 posted on 02/20/2014 8:22:06 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: Tax-chick

Where was malnutrition “standard”?


12 posted on 02/21/2014 4:58:28 AM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Across much of the South, for example. Remember the studies that showed pellagra was a nutrient deficiency disease, rather than communicable?


13 posted on 02/21/2014 5:22:14 AM PST by Tax-chick (The future is not going to take us seriously.)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear
In the 1960's the The Stratemeyer Syndicate had the books in the Nancy Drew, Hardy Boys and other series rewritten. They dropped the number of chapters from 25 to 20 because children wouldn't read such long books anymore.

It is interesting when you read the original and the rewrite and see how much even then schools were failing.

I recently read the Nancy Drew mystery The Hidden Staircase (New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1930), which was a favorite of my mother's when she was growing up, and found it to be a well-written story that even grown-ups could appreciate. I started to read the revised version from the 1960's, but it was so dumbed down that it failed to hold my interest after I had read only a few pages.

14 posted on 02/23/2014 9:29:07 AM PST by Fiji Hill
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To: SWAMPSNIPER; Tax-chick
Other common illnesses caused by malnutrition that are no longer seen are goiters and rickets. My Dad had rickets as a child and it was not at all uncommon. This was in the late 40s. And then there was Scurvy.

And then there is iodine deficiency which is still the leading cause of preventable mental retardation.

15 posted on 02/23/2014 12:31:55 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

I’m reading a book about the Italian campaign in World War II, 1934-44. One point that struck me was how little food people had in Sicily and southern Italy, even before the war.


16 posted on 02/23/2014 12:47:21 PM PST by Tax-chick (The future is not going to take us seriously.)
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To: Tax-chick
It wasn't until the 1980s when we began having more then enough as regards to food. Since the 1950’s the supply was growing and we had less people hungry but true abundance for all in the USA wasn't until that point.

There is a reason why SciFi writers had the future being a very hungry place, they were looking at the past and projecting.

Prior to the 1950s people did starve to death in the West and the further you go back the more common it became.

17 posted on 02/23/2014 12:56:44 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

The Great Depression wasn’t even 100 years ago. I was talking about guns to someone at church yesterday, and he wondered what people storing guns and ammunition expected to happen ... the Zombie Apocalypse? I told him about the book I was reading, and observed that those people didn’t expect the Zombie Apocalypse (or the German 10th Army, or Bomber Command) either, but World War II happened all over them.

Stuff you don’t expect can happen.


18 posted on 02/23/2014 2:14:48 PM PST by Tax-chick (The future is not going to take us seriously.)
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To: Tax-chick
There was a gentleman following The Great War who decided that he wanted to live out his days in peace and quiet far from war. So he packed up the family and moved to Guam.

Didn't work out as planned.

19 posted on 02/23/2014 5:21:50 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Like the man who moved from the battlefield at Gettysburg and ended up on the battlefield at Appamattox.


20 posted on 02/23/2014 5:22:46 PM PST by Tax-chick (The future is not going to take us seriously.)
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To: Tax-chick
Que sera, sera.

Some things can be prevented by planning and foresight. Other times only being warned of God in a dream is going to keep you from ending up in the soup.

21 posted on 02/23/2014 5:29:01 PM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Excellent point. Crazy old world out there.


22 posted on 02/23/2014 5:29:52 PM PST by Tax-chick (The future is not going to take us seriously.)
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To: BruceDeitrickPrice

This is why Common Core is using Federal manuals as reading assignments: to train people to hate reading.


23 posted on 02/23/2014 5:33:15 PM PST by combat_boots (The Lion of Judah cometh. Hallelujah. Gloria Patri, Filio et Spiritui Sancto!)
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