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1 Dead, Dozens Rushed To Area Hospitals After Carbon Monoxide Leak At Long Island Mall
cbs ^

Posted on 02/22/2014 8:51:41 PM PST by BenLurkin

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) – One person is dead and at least two dozen others were rushed to area hospitals for apparent carbon monoxide poisoning at a mall on Long Island Saturday evening.

As CBS 2′s Hazel Sanchez reported, police said 55-year-old Steven Nelson, the manager of the Legal Sea Foods restaurant located at the Walt Whitman Shops in Huntington Station, was killed by the odorless gas.

total of 28 people were also rushed to area hospitals and treated for elevated levels of carbon monoxide, 1010 WINS reported.

“The original call was that a woman had fallen and had a head injury. That’s possibly as a result of the carbon monoxide. That ultimately was not the person who died. That was someone else. But that’s what started the response of the emergency personel,” Suffolk County Police Lt. Jack Fitzpatrick told Sanchez.

A spokesperson for Huntington Hospital said 10 of those sickened were rushed there and that others were triaged at the scene, 1010 WINS reported.

Fitzpatrick said four of those affected were ambulatory workers and three were police officers who responded to the scene, WCBS 880′s Sophia Hall reported.

Police said the leak originated in the basement of Panera Bread, possibly due to a faulty heating system, Sanchez reported.

The Panera Bread as well as the neighboring Cheesecake Factory were evacuated as a precaution.

Kathy Sella and Ashley Harper were at the Cheesecake Factory when the wait staff told the entire restaurant to get out, Sanchez reported.

“We were sitting at the bar, we are having a glass of wine. And then somebody came up to us – I think it was one of the waitresses – and she said that ‘you had to leave,’” Sella said.

“She’s like everyone has to evacuate the building and we’re like what’s the matter and she says there’s a gas leak,” Harper added.

Most of those sickened have since been treated and released. Those who remain hospitalized are expect to make a full recovery.


TOPICS: Local News
KEYWORDS: carbonmonoxide; gasleak

1 posted on 02/22/2014 8:51:41 PM PST by BenLurkin
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To: BenLurkin

Breaking bump


2 posted on 02/22/2014 8:52:19 PM PST by Jet Jaguar
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To: BenLurkin

Awful.


3 posted on 02/22/2014 8:54:49 PM PST by Beowulf9
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To: BenLurkin

The problem with CO is that there actually is no safe limit and one never actually recovers from inhaling it… yes there is the ‘official’ safe limit but the reality is that the more you ingest, the more damage is done….and any damage done is permanent. So, inhale a little and do a little permanent damage, inhale a lot and do a lot of damage.


4 posted on 02/22/2014 9:04:48 PM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: hecticskeptic

Where would it come from in a mall?


5 posted on 02/22/2014 9:05:46 PM PST by BenLurkin (This is not a statement of fact. It is either opinion or satire; or both.)
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To: BenLurkin

Someone let out a big one?


6 posted on 02/22/2014 9:17:51 PM PST by GeronL (Vote for Conservatives not for Republicans!)
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To: hecticskeptic

What permanent damage? CO binds permanently to hemoglobin, but as red cells are replaced, the carboxyhemoglobin is gotten rid of, so what permanent damage are you talking about?


7 posted on 02/22/2014 9:18:42 PM PST by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: BenLurkin

Hhmmmm...reminds me of an episode of “24”


8 posted on 02/22/2014 9:23:47 PM PST by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: BenLurkin

“She’s like everyone has to evacuate the building and we’re like what’s the matter and she says there’s a gas leak,” Harper added.
_________________________________

Wellesley grad no doubt


9 posted on 02/22/2014 9:34:24 PM PST by Tennessee Nana
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To: from occupied ga
What permanent damage?

The problem is that even a slight lack of oxygen results in a brain injury…. General cognitive ability, headaches, propensity to be distracted/disorganized/inability to multi-task etc. Then there are related physical symptoms which are things like inability to keep one’s balance, vertigo… for men, the inability to maintain an erection. By no means a complete list but it is in these areas that problems arise.

10 posted on 02/22/2014 9:40:49 PM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: hecticskeptic; BenLurkin; from occupied ga
Some serious misinformation here.

First, there is always a "safe limit" for anything. If you don't understand that, you don't understand the "fineness" of the granularity of matter.

Second, small amounts of CO will NOT do any permanent damage to the human body. Larger amounts may. (I would call death permanent damage. Brain damage is also possible but certainly NOT inevitable.)

Third, the effects of CO are not cumulative over large spans of time. They may be cumulative over short spans of time.

Fourth, the binding of CO to hemoglobin IS a reversible reaction, but it does take a while for it to occur.

CO is very toxic. If I recall correctly, the lethal dose 50% (LD50) is 1% for one minute.

11 posted on 02/22/2014 9:42:55 PM PST by rmh47 (Go Kats! - Got eight? NRA Life Member])
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To: rmh47
Some serious misinformation here....

I have some experience in this area as my brother was seriously exposed to CO a few years ago. I feel that CO is such an underrated danger that this past year, I purchased 50 CO detectors that are about the size of a key chain. I gave them away to all my family members and employees. I picked the one I did because it gives readings in trace amounts as opposed to just giving an alarm. My employees could be exposed to CO in the factories where they do work or even in hotel rooms... yes, this past year there has been quite a few incidents of high CO levels in hotel rooms due to pool heaters etc not working properly.

12 posted on 02/22/2014 9:50:45 PM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: BenLurkin

an a malling tragedy


13 posted on 02/22/2014 9:51:24 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: BenLurkin
John Kerry first response team leader said "all the victims were deniers of global warming"

he furthered "despite the fact my yacht is firmly anchored in sea ice, the beaches are open"

and additionally from the "Frosty Gator" in Tampa...

14 posted on 02/22/2014 9:51:24 PM PST by bigheadfred
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To: rmh47

It has been more than 12 years since my son got carbon monoxide poisoning, he realized before he passed out what was going on and was able to crawl to a place where someone would see him and call for help. A co-worker who was with him said that his heart was jumping out of his chest.

The ambulance crew gave him oxygen and he was in the hospital for around 30 minutes before he came to and told them what was wrong they checked and said that he had what should be a lethal dose He recovered quickly and as far as I know has had no permanent damage. The Dr. said that he had the heart of a horse because he shouldn’t have survived.

Some years later he had to have a hernia operation and the medical staff was amazed that his heart rate was only 40 beats per minute and when he was in the recovery room the alarm was constantly going off, they thought he was a marathon runner or something.


15 posted on 02/22/2014 9:56:19 PM PST by tiki
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To: rmh47
Second, small amounts of CO will NOT do any permanent damage to the human body.

What I said too, but don't expect anyone on this forum to ever admit they're wrong.

16 posted on 02/22/2014 9:56:36 PM PST by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: BenLurkin

I worked at a big company in Dallas in the 1980s. I would arrive in the morning feeling fine, but after a while I would feel crappy, and I wasn’t the only one. A team of us were assigned to figure out what the problem might be.

The result: it turned out that the main air intake for the building was located OVER THE LOADING DOCK. The big rigs would show up at the loading dock and leave their engines running, filling the building with unhealthy stuff.

Workable solution: no engines may be left running at the loading dock.

What were the architects thinking? Or did their building have air intakes over the loading dock too, so they couldn’t think?


17 posted on 02/22/2014 10:19:06 PM PST by AZLiberty (No tag today.)
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To: BenLurkin

This is horrible. When the EPA mandates CO2 sequestration and thus has several reservoirs that can be used against the population when the feds desires there will be an even worse tragedy that could have been avoided if we simply would stand up to our own government.


18 posted on 02/22/2014 10:24:56 PM PST by Pox (Good Night. I expect more respect tomorrow.)
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To: BenLurkin

So sad. You trust the air in public places. Poor thing.

At home I think I am totally safe - right, if your windows are always open and no heating is used?


19 posted on 02/23/2014 1:25:13 AM PST by Yaelle
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To: BenLurkin
Where would it come from in a mall?

Here's a link with a bit more detail.... http://www.wowktv.com/story/24796783/carbon-monoxide-detected-at-ny-mall-eatery-1-dead Not sure what 'faulty heating system' means but it could be as simple as a cracked flue pipe or heat exchanger.

20 posted on 02/23/2014 3:24:49 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: from occupied ga
Since the topic being dealt with here is a life or death one, you might want to be absolutely sure of yourself before being to glib about it. If a person has CO poisoning at lower levels, they may very well recover…. but that doesn’t mean that the recovery is so perfect that it’s as if it never happened. You might want to read this OSHA fact sheet…. See the last paragraph under ‘How Does CO harm you?’ https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/carbonmonoxide-factsheet.pdf Obviously, all of this depends on the factors that are unique to a particular situation i.e. what concentration, for how long and the particulars of the person who was exposed.
21 posted on 02/23/2014 3:31:12 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: Yaelle
At home I think I am totally safe - right, if your windows

are always open and no heating is used?

What I have is a high quality detector that measures trace elements in addition to being an alarm. These devices are recommended to be replaced every 5(?) or so and rather than throw them out, I just buy a new one but put new batteries in and keep the old ones as well .....and put it in a different part of the house. I'm up to 5 of them and even if they don't work as well as new, I always have my latest one that should be working properly.

22 posted on 02/23/2014 3:37:08 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: Pox

CO and CO2 are different gases.


23 posted on 02/23/2014 5:34:32 AM PST by muir_redwoods (When I first read it, " Atlas Shrugged" was fiction)
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To: hecticskeptic

In 2009, several tour buses parked close to ventilation shaft at an ice arena (during a major tournament) in Illinois caused an evacuation and sent several individuals to a hospital


24 posted on 02/23/2014 5:39:01 AM PST by slapshot
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To: Yaelle
You trust the air in public places.

I think the important thing is not to be the most susceptible. Let someone else be the canary in that coal mine. I just replaced my CO detectors (they were five years old). CO is one of those things I do worry about, and about which I can do something.

There was a guy on the internet that used to sell ampules of CO that you would break open and put in a plastic bad with your CO detector to test it. I can't find them anymore, now I have to depend on the age of the device.

25 posted on 02/23/2014 5:49:08 AM PST by Lonesome in Massachussets (In the long run, we are all dead.)
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To: slapshot

Link: I was officiating a game then. I thought I was coming down with the flu in the worst way.


26 posted on 02/23/2014 5:50:55 AM PST by slapshot
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To: slapshot
2009, several tour buses parked close to ventilation shaft at an ice arena…

CO can be highly insidious as far as how it builds up. Here’s one frightening example of how easily this can occur. In recent years there has been a big move to have houses more and more airtight to reduce energy costs. I believe that almost all new gas furnaces have a dedicated air supply pipe that goes to the outdoors to bring in combustion air (this isn’t the case everywhere but I believe it is with all new furnaces where I live)… so furnaces usually aren’t the problem. However, the furnace isn’t the only combustion air source in the house…. one device which is often overlooked but typically should be of far greater concern is the water heater. If a gas water heater is used that is naturally vented (as opposed to having a fan to discharge the flue gases, there is a very real likelihood that the flue gas could end up in the house if conditions change in the house that cause the indoor air pressure to drop below outdoor ambient. How could that happen? Very easily….. take a house that has been built quite airtight and now turn on some equipment that exhausts air. A few years ago, I bought a high powered hood arrangement for my kitchen that has a fan on that exhausts air at the rate of 350 cubic feet per minute. Switch that on and switch on a few bathroom exhaust fans… and for good measure, do some vacuuming with a central vac unit that is located and exhausting into the garage. All of a sudden, you might find that your house has gone quite negative and if that naturally aspirated gas fired water heater comes on at that time, it very likely will be discharging its fumes into the indoor space because it can’t vent against the air that is entering your house via the gas water heater flue pipe. If this happens to coincide with your teenage daughter having an hour long shower and someone doing a pile of laundry, that water heater could be on for a very long time… There are plenty of documented cases where this is the exact mechanism where people living in their houses have been poisoned.

27 posted on 02/23/2014 7:09:49 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: slapshot
I was officiating a game then.

Hockey arenas are notorious for CO... when it happens, it is often because something wasn't quite tuned up right on the engine of the gas powered surfacing machine. This is not all that uncommon.

All of these types of cases in conjunction withe the one I mentioned in my previous post about houses is all the more reason to always have a portable CO detector on oneself. If you send your kids over to your neighbour's house, how do you know that they don't have a CO problem? Two of the engineers that work for me were doing some testing in a steel plant just two weeks ago and somebody had inadvertently left a test port open on a steel furnace exhaust duct. Flue gas was being pumped out of it and fortunately, there were CO alarms nearby that were triggered. It can happen so easily and as already mentioned here, sometimes the person in the vicinity never knows anything other than she/he seems to inexplicable have come down with flu symptoms. One very big danger is the cockpit of small aircraft... any leakage in the exhaust system will find its way into the cabin. All these are reasons why you must have a portable CO detector on you.

28 posted on 02/23/2014 7:19:45 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: muir_redwoods
Of course they are, but when you have enough CO2 to displace most or all of the breathable air in a given area for a few minutes, what do you think is going to happen? See CO2 Suffocation or CO2 Poisoning. Not to mention Lake Nyos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lake_Nyos

29 posted on 02/23/2014 7:42:14 AM PST by Pox (Good Night. I expect more respect tomorrow.)
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To: Pox

I’m well aware of CO2’s ability to suffocate; the topic under discussion was CO. I think the government has lots easier ways to kill large numbers of people that CO2 suffocation.


30 posted on 02/23/2014 8:45:17 AM PST by muir_redwoods (When I first read it, " Atlas Shrugged" was fiction)
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To: hecticskeptic

Where did you get these tiny CO detectors?

I never heard of them.

.


31 posted on 02/23/2014 9:34:56 AM PST by Mears
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To: Mears
Where did you get these tiny CO detectors?

The company that makes the one I was talking about in an earlier post is called KWJ Engineering out of California... they make a number of products but the small CO detector is called the Pocket CO. I am not aware of another company that makes a comparable product... at least not one that gives trace readings. If you do an Ixquick on them, you can find it real fast. However, if you have a problem, just send me a private message... I can even give you the name of the individual who I'm dealing with there.

32 posted on 02/23/2014 10:52:07 AM PST by hecticskeptic
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To: hecticskeptic

I found KWJ’s website and also that of another company that sells the ones KWJ manufactures.

Information re:KWJ in the manual at following site.

http://www.pilotshop.com/catalog/pspages/co300.php?gclid=CL6vvJmY47wCFQIOOgodC

Thanks so much for your helpfulness.

M


33 posted on 02/23/2014 2:42:05 PM PST by Mears
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