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Corrupt ‘Kids for Cash’ judge ruined more than 2,000 lives
New York Post ^ | Feb. 23, 2014 | Larry Getlen

Posted on 02/24/2014 10:11:58 AM PST by drypowder

Judge Ciavarella, who sentenced around 3,000 children in a similar manner, was later sentenced himself to 28 years in prison for financial crimes related to his acceptance of $2.2 million as a finder’s fee for the construction of a for-profit facility in which to house these so-called delinquents.

(Excerpt) Read more at nypost.com ...


TOPICS: Society
KEYWORDS: corruption
Just one major problem with US Judges, they all start out as lawyers. Oh yeah, that's right, most DC politicians are lawyers. Well, KARMA HAPPENS!
1 posted on 02/24/2014 10:11:58 AM PST by drypowder
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To: drypowder

Ambulance chasers in cheap polyester robes.

But you gotta say “yes your honor”. “No your honor”.

But that’s OK. Ukrainian photo day may come here some day.


2 posted on 02/24/2014 10:30:16 AM PST by DariusBane (Liberty and Risk. Flip sides of the same coin. So how much risk will YOU accept?)
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To: drypowder

Whose genius idea was it to privatise the justice/prison system anyway? At the risk of sounding lefty, allowing the existence of a for-profit prison system is a hell of a conflict of interest when it comes to facilitating justice and rehabilitation.


3 posted on 02/24/2014 10:30:29 AM PST by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: drypowder

From his Wiki:

“In 1995 he ran for judge in Luzerne County on the Democratic ticket and was elected to a ten year term. He was re-elected to a second ten year term in 2005. Ciavarella was also active in several civic and Catholic organizations. He is married to the former Cindy Baer and the couple have three children.[1]”

Funny how the party affiliation is missing . . . the NY Post is usually better than that.


4 posted on 02/24/2014 10:31:38 AM PST by LRoggy (Peter's Son's Business)
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To: drypowder
Just one major problem with US Judges, they all start out as lawyers.

There is no legal reason for them to be lawyers. I am leaning toward the idea of not allowing more then half of the judges in any area to be lawyers.

5 posted on 02/24/2014 10:34:08 AM PST by Harmless Teddy Bear (Proud Infidel, Gun Nut, Religious Fanatic and Freedom Fiend)
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To: drypowder

Truly a horrible situation. I didn’t know you could get a ‘funders fee” for — profitably caging children.


6 posted on 02/24/2014 10:34:24 AM PST by Mrs. Don-o ("The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately wicked: who can know it?" - Jeremiah 17:9)
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To: sinsofsolarempirefan

Not necessarily inherently.

The cops, prosecutors and certainly the judges aren’t supposed to have any financial connection to the for-profit prison.

IOW, the prison and judge were already breaking multiple laws.

What a horrible story!

However, in the service of context I’d like to point out that the judge never sentenced 2000 children improperly. There is, I would say, a very good chance the majority of those sentenced got exactly what they deserved.

Doesn’t justify the breakdown in due process here, but does mean the headline is more than a little hyperbolic. It should be noted that the stories in the article are exactly that, one side’s story of what happened. They are unlikely to be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.


7 posted on 02/24/2014 10:41:05 AM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: sinsofsolarempirefan

It gets better. Many of these places have State contracts that require a certain percentage of “bed” occupancy. If the beds go empty, they still get paid.


8 posted on 02/24/2014 10:41:41 AM PST by Wolfie
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To: Sherman Logan
There is, I would say, a very good chance the majority of those sentenced got exactly what they deserved.

Doesn’t justify the breakdown in due process here, but does mean the headline is more than a little hyperbolic. It should be noted that the stories in the article are exactly that, one side’s story of what happened. They are unlikely to be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

Blaming the victims, I see. The hyperbole is completely legitimate, every sentence he passed down is under a cloud now. In a strange twist, society is the victim as well. Officers of the court must never countenance even the appearance of a conflict of interest for fear of tainting justice. Now society can not distinguish the guilty from the innocent because due process was suborned. No one can safely make the claim any of the sentenced "got what they deserved". Let's add to that the essential fact that children were taken from parents, that people were coerced into giving up their rights to legal representation - these things are not contested btw - who pays for all of this? They are owed compensation to make them whole, and they can't be made whole because they were minors. Due process was suborned. There is no way to get around that. Every case that ever had a connection with this judge is completely unreliable. He was only able to get away with it for so long because no one who had a responsibility to ensure justice actually verified it was done. So he was not alone in complicity.

9 posted on 02/24/2014 11:50:31 AM PST by no-s (when democracy is displaced by tyranny, the armed citizen still gets to vote)
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To: no-s

The “children” in this case were victimized by a lack of proper due process.

This is quite different from saying they were treated unfairly on a cosmic justice scale.

Let’s look at an example. Let’s say a man is convicted of and executed for a murder he did not commit. This was a failure of the justice system to properly handle his case. He has a legitimate right to complain about that as a miscarriage of justice.

But let’s also assume this same man had committed several other murder for which he was not arrested. He deserves to die for them, so to my mind thereby loses his right to claim that he was treated unjustly on the scale of cosmic justice. In fact, the element of poetic justice starts to creep in.

This is of course all theoretical, as humans don’t have access to knowledge about cosmic justice.

You are quite correct that this judge has tainted every single case in which he was involved. Which is why all of them are being re-examined, as they should be. IMO every benefit of doubt should go the child in each such case. Generous compensation should be given those who were mistreated.

My only point is that if a child would have received a similar sentence from another judge who was not corrupt, then that child has no right (on the cosmic justice scale) to claim he/she received an unfair sentence. Unfair trials often, indeed in America probably most of the time, produce a just result.


10 posted on 02/24/2014 12:07:43 PM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: Sherman Logan

“The cops, prosecutors and certainly the judges aren’t supposed to have any financial connection to the for-profit prison.”

Of course, it does provide a strong incentive for the private prison not to work too hard on anything related to rehabilitation, assuming they get paid per ‘customer’.


11 posted on 02/24/2014 1:01:28 PM PST by sinsofsolarempirefan
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To: Mrs. Don-o

12 posted on 02/24/2014 1:17:10 PM PST by Neidermeyer (I used to be disgusted , now I try to be amused.)
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To: Sherman Logan
Unfair trials often, indeed in America probably most of the time, produce a just result.

But, as you say, we do not access to knowledge about cosmic justice. So how could we know for certain? If it is possible for a person who is innocent only of the one thing (but guilty of other crimes unknown for certain) to be convicted and sentenced unjustly for that one thing, who's to say it couldn't happen for another who is innocent of any crime whatsoever?

Willingness to accept the conviction of innocents in the name of "cosmic justice" is supporting actual injustice "just in case". We should do better to take care so that ridiculous laws and corrupt judges do not undermine the concept of guilt beyond all reasonable doubt. Follow that path and eventually guilt and innocence become subject to the opinion of the powerful.

13 posted on 02/24/2014 2:54:52 PM PST by no-s (when democracy is displaced by tyranny, the armed citizen still gets to vote)
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To: no-s

I think you are misunderstanding me. I fully agree that everyone who has had a flawed trial should have their case reviewed and if appropriate be paid generous compensation, have their record cleared, etc.

I’m merely pointing that when I stand before God, I cannot claim I was victimized in any real sense if I was punished for a crime I didn’t commit, when I got away with others without being caught.

Since we as fallible humans cannot know who does and does not fit this paradigm, we must and should treat them all as victims of injustice.

But that doesn’t mean I am required to look at a group and agree they were all innocents


14 posted on 02/24/2014 4:20:18 PM PST by Sherman Logan
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To: drypowder

Perhaps we need to eliminate the volunteer system of judges.

Make it a mandatory conscription for six years with all the pension benefits they pertain.

Any qualified lawyer of 10 years can be randomly called up.


15 posted on 02/25/2014 12:22:54 PM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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To: longtermmemmory

you may be on to something. maybe we ought to do that for all judges and federal politicians as well; No degree of any kind required, must be an American born citizen with two American born citizen parents and must pass a pro Constitutional quiz to qualify.


16 posted on 02/25/2014 1:38:51 PM PST by drypowder
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To: drypowder

No not quite, you second part is just a non-starter in any serious conversation.

Best example would be no former DOJ lawyers. No former prosecutors or public defenders.

The compromise would be to require them to be out of the public payroll for a minimum of six years. (that includes no special court appointments or magistrate duty)

going all “birthery” would not sell to the public at large and never be taken serious.


17 posted on 02/27/2014 7:57:07 AM PST by longtermmemmory (VOTE! http://www.senate.gov and http://www.house.gov)
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