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Man dies after being bitten by a common household SPIDER: dismissed tiny bite to the neck....
DAILY MAIL ^ | 27 February 2014 | DAILY MAIL REPORTER

Posted on 02/28/2014 4:58:25 AM PST by dennisw

Ronald Reese, 62, of Lakeland, Florida died February 16 from complications from a brown recluse spider bite Reese was bitten on this neck in August and numerous related illnesses and hospital stays followed

A 62-year-old Florida man's February 16 death is being blamed on a brown recluse spider bite, a fatality so rare that statistics aren't even kept for them. Ronald Reese was bitten in the neck by the spider, which are usually about the size of a U.S. quarter, all the way back in August while clearing out an old house. What followed were six agonizing months of related illnesses as the Lakeland man clung to life with an abscess eating away toward his spine until he finally let go last week.

Reese managed to make it home that day in August after he was bitten, but by the following day his father told TheLedger.com that his son could barely get out of bed. Days after that, a paralyzed Reese collapsed. The Polk County Medical Examiner deemed his death the result of complications from a spider bite, but between his collapse and his eventual death, Reese suffered terribly.

Reese's 88-year-old father William Reese said his son went through numerous procedures and was in and out of the hospital, but nothing seemed to work.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: brownreclusespider; florida

1 posted on 02/28/2014 4:58:25 AM PST by dennisw
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To: dennisw

Ugh, what a way to go..


2 posted on 02/28/2014 5:00:02 AM PST by cardinal4
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To: dennisw

Spray more insecticide!


3 posted on 02/28/2014 5:10:21 AM PST by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: cardinal4

So, where is the outcry from Mares against spider violence? One of my former work buddies got bitten by a Brown Recluse. Didn’t kill him be sure caused a big chunk of his thigh to be taken out. Nasty little devils.


4 posted on 02/28/2014 5:13:20 AM PST by rktman (Under my plan(scheme),unemployment will necessarily skyrocket! Despite the % dropping. Period.)
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To: from occupied ga
The brown recluse is common hereabouts in Missouri. Fatalities are extremely rare.
5 posted on 02/28/2014 5:14:00 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: humblegunner

ping


6 posted on 02/28/2014 5:17:52 AM PST by thackney (life is fragile, handle with prayer)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

The pictures online of those spider bites scare the beejesus out of me.

People should have drawing salve and activated charcoal on hand to draw out the venom of a spider bite.


7 posted on 02/28/2014 5:19:09 AM PST by RummyChick
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To: cardinal4

I got bit by one last spring. It sucked. Was hiding in my sweatshirt. It was unbelievably painful for about a week, the it started to heal. Thankfully it didn’t break open. Needless to say, I would rather not go through it again.


8 posted on 02/28/2014 5:19:26 AM PST by gopno1
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

My brother developed progressive cellulitis from a BR spider bite that after several years, took his life.


9 posted on 02/28/2014 5:21:12 AM PST by Right Brother
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
The brown recluse is common hereabouts in Missouri. Fatalities are extremely rare.

Maybe if all of the brown recluses in MO were shipped to NJ or NY ...

10 posted on 02/28/2014 5:23:42 AM PST by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: dennisw

Years ago a recluse bit me on my thigh...ended up with a hole I could put my fist in before it finally healed. I can only imagine how bad it would be to get bit neck/head/face.


11 posted on 02/28/2014 5:24:37 AM PST by Tammy8
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To: RummyChick
The young daughter of the guy who built our house suffered a BR bite some years ago on her right arm. The bite grew from a red spot about the size of a dime to a full 2 inches across. The girl was treated at Mayo's in Rochester and today still has a deep scar but her arm was saved.
12 posted on 02/28/2014 5:31:34 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: Tammy8
I've been bitten 3-times .twice on the left hand (hiding in my nail bag) and once on the right big toe (in my boot).
The thumb wasted away to just skin and bone after 20+ years never got my full strength back .
The brown recluse spider bite looks almost like an ant bite ,but comes to a clear blister and etches & burns
13 posted on 02/28/2014 5:41:37 AM PST by piroque ("In times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act")
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To: dennisw

It may be rare to die of this, but as we see even from the comments here this is a very dangerous creature.

I think they are found throughout the US.


14 posted on 02/28/2014 5:46:10 AM PST by jocon307
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"The native range lies roughly south of a line from southeastern Nebraska through southern Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana to southwestern Ohio. In the southern states, it is native from central Texas to western Georgia and north to Kentucky.

Despite rumors to the contrary, the brown recluse spider has not established itself in California nor anywhere outside its native range. Over the last century, occasional spiders have been intercepted in various states where they have no known established populations; these spiders may be transported fairly easily, though the lack of established populations well outside the natural range also indicates that such movement has not led to colonization of new areas, after decades of opportunities.
Note that the occurrence of brown recluses in a single building (such as a warehouse) outside of the native range is not considered a successful colonization; such single-building populations can occur (e.g., several such cases in Florida, but do not spread, and can be easily eradicated."

Source: Wikipedia

15 posted on 02/28/2014 5:51:13 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: from occupied ga

Spiders ain’t insects - but that stuff’ll kill ‘em anyhow!


16 posted on 02/28/2014 5:58:23 AM PST by Quality_Not_Quantity (Liars use facts when the truth doesn't suit their purposes.)
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To: dennisw
This woman I know, got bit by one on her leg.. the abscess was nasty, but the WORST part was, during treatment for it, she contracted MRSA. It ate away half the tissue in her leg. Nearly lost her leg and her life.

talk about bad luck

17 posted on 02/28/2014 5:59:10 AM PST by Paradox (Unexpected things coming for the next few years.)
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To: dennisw

the brown recluse is a nasty little beast


18 posted on 02/28/2014 6:05:30 AM PST by Nifster
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To: dennisw

Worst bite I ever had, worse than a pygmy rattler. I ended up with a secondary infection in my mastoid sinuses that kept me sick for almost a year.


19 posted on 02/28/2014 6:10:24 AM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: dennisw

I lived with many brown recluse spiders in west Tennessee.
My last home and business was an old 2 story school building
that was full of them. The recluse is also known as a “fiddle back” because of the violin shape mark on its back.
It looks like any small common spider.
When bitten, one will see a small blister which will, within a short time, collapse and create a volcano shaped blister. You will not likely feel anything when it bites you.
It is imperative that you get immediate treatment, consisting of massive doses of cortisone by injections. If untreated, the bight will begin to rot the skin around it, often requiring plastic surgery.
The spider was unknown in many areas, such as Tennessee, prior to the 1970s, or so. It has spread across the US in shipping shipping cartons, as people move from state to state.


20 posted on 02/28/2014 6:10:56 AM PST by AlexW
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To: trisham

They hitch rides in packing crates and luggage and can show up way beyond their natural range.


21 posted on 02/28/2014 6:12:45 AM PST by SWAMPSNIPER (The Second Amendment, a Matter of Fact, Not a Matter of Opinion)
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To: dennisw
I have heard stories and read testimonies from people who swear by a cure they used for a Brown Recluse spider bite.

It sounds odd and painful but apparently it does work.

It involves an electrical charge passed through the site of the wound. The most common way is to use the charge created by the start of a lawnmower. Remove the wire from the spark plug. Ground one side of the wound to the tip of the plug or body of the engine. The spark plug wire goes on the skin on the other side of the wound. A fast pull on the starter cord does the trick. Something about the low current/high voltage charge that destroys the venom...whether it's the enzymes in it that get zapped or something else, I don't know.

If ever I get bit I intend to try it immediately. Call me nuts but modern medical science has no cure. I would be looking to old time cures if it were me.

22 posted on 02/28/2014 6:13:02 AM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts ("The further a society drifts from truth the more it will hate those who speak it." - George Orwell)
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To: dennisw

Reading all of the anecdotes about brown recluse spider bite effects that have been posted in less than 15 minutes, I wonder how rare these problems are.


23 posted on 02/28/2014 6:13:52 AM PST by grania
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To: dennisw

That is awful! I have an elderly brother in law (84) who lives in the Texas panhandle. My son & dau-in-law went by to check on him about 3 weeks ago and found his house FULL of the spiders...even in his bedroom under the bed! They called an exterminator out immediately to take care of the problem. He is an independant ol’ cuss and won’t have a housekeeper “because they might steal something.” No bites so far!


24 posted on 02/28/2014 6:13:53 AM PST by native texan (Texans should be independent thinkers)
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To: trisham
"The native range lies roughly south of a line from southeastern Nebraska through southern Iowa, Illinois, and Indiana to southwestern Ohio. In the southern states, it is native from central Texas to western Georgia and north to Kentucky.

I'll be staying in Colorado forever now, thank you...
*shutter*
25 posted on 02/28/2014 6:14:15 AM PST by RandallFlagg ("I said I never had much use for one. Never said I didn't know how to use it." --Quigley)
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To: SWAMPSNIPER

Yes. I know that black widow spiders have been found here in Massachusetts in bags of grapes at the market. Brown recluse spiders have also found their way here in similar ways, brought in as “hitchhikers”.


26 posted on 02/28/2014 6:15:41 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: RandallFlagg

Colorado is not a bad place to be. :)


27 posted on 02/28/2014 6:16:38 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: cardinal4

Those things terrify me. I have/had them in my sheds and a few in my house. I tried a lot of things, but a powder I bought from a DIY pest control company seems to be working.


28 posted on 02/28/2014 6:17:15 AM PST by FreeAtlanta (Liberty or Big Government - you can't have both.)
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To: RummyChick

The pictures online of those spider bites scare the beejesus out of me.


We moved from Seattle to KY about three years ago and it was the one thing that concerned me. However, my neighbor has been bitten twice. Both times he just went to the doctor and they do something like using a hole punch to take out the skin around the bite and it usually heals up almost like nothing ever happened.

Apparently their bite is not poisonous but it carries a flesh eating bacteria. That’s why you have to remove the flesh close to the bite. If you don’t you end up with pictures of your thumb, etc. on the internet to scare everyone. ;-)


29 posted on 02/28/2014 6:29:50 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: dennisw

I used to hate jumping spiders (the only spider that has ever bitten me and it was worse than a bee sting) but no more. I found out they are a natural predator to Brown Recluses.

Meanwhile I found four or five black widows on my property last year.


30 posted on 02/28/2014 6:31:03 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: RummyChick

Don’t know you’ve been bit most of the time.


31 posted on 02/28/2014 6:45:09 AM PST by IMR 4350
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To: cuban leaf

Side note, we like in WA and are thinking of relocating to KY? How do you like it? We have been in the NW for a very long time, did you transition well?


32 posted on 02/28/2014 6:48:43 AM PST by ThisLittleLightofMine
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To: trisham
Colorado is not a bad place to be. :)

Unless you're a fan of the second amendment

33 posted on 02/28/2014 6:49:19 AM PST by from occupied ga (Your government is your most dangerous enemy)
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To: dennisw

34 posted on 02/28/2014 6:54:40 AM PST by ThomasMore (Islam is the Whore of Babylon!)
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To: dennisw; Kartographer
I bought my house 5 years ago and saw LOTs of black widows and brown recluses. WIth a pregnant wife, I declared war on them. CHEMICAL WARFARE! I used www.domyownpestcontrol.com and mix THIS in a 5:1 powder to water solution and use it as an exterior barrier spray. I use a 1:1 spray indoors. I have found dead field mice, lizards, skinks, and salamanders around my barrier. I haven't seen a spider in 5 years. DEMON WP is a GREAT product for SHTF pest control.
35 posted on 02/28/2014 6:55:06 AM PST by DCBryan1 (No realli, moose bytes can be quite nasti!!)
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To: RummyChick

I’m wondering where did he go for treatment? Was he offered hyperbaric oxygen along with advanced wound care?


36 posted on 02/28/2014 6:55:27 AM PST by nikos1121
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To: ThisLittleLightofMine

I lived in the Seattle area for 45 years. My transition was a piece of cake, except it took me two years to find “paying” work in my field. In hindsight it is because I went about it wrong. There is lots of work if you are in IT.

The only thing I hate is the bugs. You don’t just lay down in the grass around here and bug spray is NOT optional if you walk in the woods. Chiggers are an awful thing to get.

All that said, the people are wonderful and the climate is spectacular. It gets colder than Seattle but winter is MUCH shorter. The frost actually goes deeper into the ground in Seattle. And traffic is simply not an issue here.

Been here about 2.5 years now. We just bought the ~20 acres next to the place we originally bought. The property taxes are just a hair more PER YEAR than my monthly car payment on the car in the slide show. And the total price for BOTH properties was just over one year’s Seattle wages.

http://s409.photobucket.com/user/robbbb4/slideshow/Kentucky%20home


37 posted on 02/28/2014 6:57:22 AM PST by cuban leaf
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To: from occupied ga; trisham
Colorado is not a bad place to be. :)

Unless you're a fan of the second amendment


Oh, we'll be changing that VERY soon...
38 posted on 02/28/2014 7:01:09 AM PST by RandallFlagg ("I said I never had much use for one. Never said I didn't know how to use it." --Quigley)
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To: cuban leaf

What a beautiful place.


39 posted on 02/28/2014 7:03:37 AM PST by trisham (Zen is not easy. It takes effort to attain nothingness. And then what do you have? Bupkis.)
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To: cuban leaf
Looks like our ten acres here in the Missouri Ozarks.
I suspect we have more rocks, tho...
40 posted on 02/28/2014 7:07:44 AM PST by Eric in the Ozarks ("Say Not the Struggle Naught Availeth.")
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To: cuban leaf

In the PacNW the brown recluse is really the only spider you have to worry about. We have the hobo too, but the BR is the real baddy, and hangs out in wood piles.

We teach Scouts how to gather wood from piles - knocking them against the ground before gathering them up in their arms.

It’s the necrotizing that really does it. I had an Asst. Scoutmaster get bit on the posterior while working as a plumber. Out for three weeks. Doofus wouldn’t get treatment after begging him to do so.

It’s true, they do a sort of Mohr’s surgery to make sure the last tissue cut is free of the bad bacteria.


41 posted on 02/28/2014 7:08:21 AM PST by RinaseaofDs
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To: dennisw; All
Sadly, not too many people are aware of the fact that you can easily neutralize the spider venom with a simple electric shock at the site of the bite. One of the lower voltage stun guns is ideal for this.

I have a friend who successfully used this on himself to treat a brown recluse bite and had absolutely no ill effects. As he told me it's half a second of pain (the shock) to avoid months of agony.

More info here: Electric Shock Treatment For Venomous Insect Bites

42 posted on 02/28/2014 7:14:23 AM PST by Jed Eckert (Wolverines!!)
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To: dennisw

43 posted on 02/28/2014 7:15:15 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (WoT News: Rantburg.com)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

My son got bit on the back. Drained and antibiotics. Lots of them round here!


44 posted on 02/28/2014 7:41:56 AM PST by ExpatGator (I hate Illinois Nazis!)
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To: dennisw

I would NEVER have “dismissed” a bite from a spider “the size of a U.S. Quarter.” I would have been hysterical, and at the ER in minutes.


45 posted on 02/28/2014 7:46:50 AM PST by Arthur McGowan
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts

That is very interesting, having snuffed a handful of these critters here in FL, I’m going to file this one away. Thanks!

PS - I did a very quick search and see that others have used homemade leads run off of a stun gun to accomplish the same thing. Looks like a nice add to the casual internet research list.

Cheers


46 posted on 02/28/2014 9:44:54 AM PST by Sax
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To: Sax

Also stumbled upon this:

The biological basis for the mechanism behind the shock is:

The current will influence the hydrogen bonds of the enzymes, destroying their secondary and tertiary structure.
The high voltage, low amperage current applied will reduce metal ions and zinc, copper, magnesium, iron, or calcium ions, which are firmly bound to some venom enzymes and are mandatory cofactors for these enzymes.
The electric particles interfere with the membrane as well as the positive charged polypeptides, decreasing their cytotoxic properties.
Taken together the protective high-voltage treatment for venomous bites is at least in part due to action of the electrical current on the venom itself.

Surgery prior to this type of treatment is not the answer since the venom has not been neutralized and the wound will break down again within a few weeks or months. This is well documented.


47 posted on 02/28/2014 9:48:53 AM PST by Sax
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To: dennisw

Rest in peace.


48 posted on 02/28/2014 2:53:24 PM PST by OldNewYork
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To: native texan

Maybe he has been bit but is such a tough son of a gun that it never bothered him.

I use sticky traps that fold into a tent to catch spiders. You can buy them on Ebay for cheap. I put them along the wall.

You might try using those.


49 posted on 02/28/2014 4:05:59 PM PST by RummyChick
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To: dennisw

Dreadful. RIP.


50 posted on 02/28/2014 4:23:43 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (Resist We Much)
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