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Anyone ever use "powdered butter"?

Posted on 02/28/2014 11:39:15 AM PST by djf

Local grocery store has large (#10 I think) cans of "powdered butter".

How in the heck do they "powder" the fats?

I assume you add water to it to use it, but maybe you add corn oil or peanut oil.

Help! I'm confused!


TOPICS: Food
KEYWORDS: butter
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1 posted on 02/28/2014 11:39:15 AM PST by djf
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To: djf

You use it to make your powdered eggs, silly.


2 posted on 02/28/2014 11:41:06 AM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: djf

yeah but it works best if you rub her until she is steaming


3 posted on 02/28/2014 11:41:25 AM PST by bigheadfred
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To: JRandomFreeper

Ping!


4 posted on 02/28/2014 11:41:57 AM PST by lysie
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It's February 28th

Do You Know Where Your Donation Is?


Click The Pic To Donate

Please Donate Now

5 posted on 02/28/2014 11:42:32 AM PST by DJ MacWoW (The Fed Gov is not one ring to rule them all)
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To: djf

You use it in recipes, the box will tell you the substitution ratios. If there is a way use it to make butter like you would spread on something, I’m not aware of it.


6 posted on 02/28/2014 11:45:56 AM PST by thorvaldr
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To: lysie; djf
I've never used the product, so I can't speak to it.

I have used the canned butter from New Zealand and it is excellent.

/johnny

7 posted on 02/28/2014 11:47:21 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: djf

I know nothing about cooking but the water was taken out to dehydrate it, so you have to put it back in. What happens after that I have no idea.


8 posted on 02/28/2014 11:48:50 AM PST by steve86 (Some things aren't really true but you wouldn't be half surprised if they were.)
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To: djf

http://shop.honeyville.com/powdered-butter.html


9 posted on 02/28/2014 11:48:56 AM PST by mabarker1 (Please, Somebody Impeach the kenyan!!!!)
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To: djf

http://www.ehow.com/how_8490392_use-butter-powder.html


10 posted on 02/28/2014 11:49:03 AM PST by Dr. Bogus Pachysandra ( Ya can't pick up a turd by the clean end!)
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To: djf

“I assume you add water to it to use it, but maybe you add corn oil or peanut oil.”

Peanut oil works best.


11 posted on 02/28/2014 11:49:58 AM PST by TexasGator
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To: djf

Wonder how that would have worked in the movie “Last Tango In Paris”?


12 posted on 02/28/2014 11:50:34 AM PST by Howie66 (John Wayne McCornyn...he's just like US! Honest!)
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To: djf

I’ve not used it (honestly never heard of it before now), but here is a website that gives its history and how they manage to dehydrate it:

https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/butter_powder.htm#.UxDn287hfqg


13 posted on 02/28/2014 11:50:39 AM PST by DemforBush (A Repo Man is *always* intense.)
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra

Yes, put the water back in — rehydrate it.


14 posted on 02/28/2014 11:51:14 AM PST by steve86 (Some things aren't really true but you wouldn't be half surprised if they were.)
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To: djf
Our butter powder is a fine, free flowing powder. By looking at it you'd never guess it's #1 ingredient is butter. Many people say, "I didn't think you could dehydrate fat." And they're right. You can't dehydrate fat as dehydrate literally means to 'remove the water' and fat has none. The small amount of water in butter is removed, however. Then, the powder is made by cleverly processing milk solids with the butter. Reconstituted butter powder looks much like whipped butter and tastes like butter with an added milky flavor to it. Because it does have a milky taste, some people find it takes just a bit of getting used to as a spread on bread. However, the mouth 'feel' is the same as butter and it looks and spreads much like butter after it has been reconstituted. It will even melt into hot toast and pancakes almost as fast as regular butter.

https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/butter_powder.htm

15 posted on 02/28/2014 11:51:31 AM PST by Abby4116
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To: DemforBush

We have all those dried products in #10 cans — my wife will know what to do if/when the time comes. She grew up making do in a very poor third-world country and this stuff is a luxury.


16 posted on 02/28/2014 11:53:25 AM PST by steve86 (Some things aren't really true but you wouldn't be half surprised if they were.)
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To: djf

I used to buy “Molly McButter” and sprinkle it on steamed vegetables. Perhaps it was powdered butter. Anyway, it worked on warm, moist food best, but you could also put it on popcorn.


17 posted on 02/28/2014 11:55:23 AM PST by married21 ( As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.)
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To: djf

I know a guy who invented powdered water — But he doesn’t know what to add...so, yeah.


18 posted on 02/28/2014 11:55:49 AM PST by areukiddingme1 (areukiddingme1 is a synonym for a Retired U.S. Navy Chief Petty Officer and tired of liberal BS.))
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To: djf
Anyone ever use "powdered butter"?

Not for anything kinky, if that's what you're asking.

19 posted on 02/28/2014 11:56:37 AM PST by humblegunner
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Honeyville’s Powdered Butter is amazingly versatile, convenient, useful and full of flavor. You can easily substitute it for real butter in any recipe, whether you’re making some mashed potatoes or baking a birthday cake. Since there is no refrigeration required, you can take your butter powder anywhere and use it to make some pancakes on a backpacking trip, or put together some tin foil meals that need butter and enjoy a family campfire dinner. It’s a great timesaver for everyday and long term use.

Think of all the meals and recipes that ask for butter and imagine going to the fridge just to find that you’re out. No need to make an extra trip to the grocery store, because you have some dried butter ready to be used! Powdered butter is very easy-to-use in any recipe, so it’s a natural must-have for both food storage and daily kitchen needs.

Shelf-Life: Stores for 3 to 5 years in a sealed #10 can (oxygen absorber included) under ideal storage conditions (cool, dry place). Once opened, it has an average shelf life of 6 to 12 months.

Instructions: Blend 3 tablespoons powdered butter and 1 teaspoon warm water. The texture and flavor can change with more or less water.

Uses: Able to be used in combination with baked goods, potatoes, pastas and anything that requires butter.

Packaging: Powdered Butter is sealed air tight in a #10 can and weighs approximately 2.25 pounds. A case contains 6 #10 cans and weighs 13.5 pounds. Each can contains 51 servings. One serving size is 3 tablespoons.

Ingredients: Butter (cream, water, salt), Nonfat Milk, Tocopherols, Ascorbyl Palmitate and BHT (added to protect flavor). Contains less than 2% Silicon Dioxide as an anti-caking agent.

Allergen information: Contains milk. This product is produced on equipment that processes products containing soy, wheat, milk, egg, peanut, and tree nuts.


20 posted on 02/28/2014 11:57:23 AM PST by mabarker1 (Please, Somebody Impeach the kenyan!!!!)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Rookie that I am, I never heard of canned butter.


21 posted on 02/28/2014 11:59:23 AM PST by lysie
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To: djf

Probably meant as a lower-fat alternative, such as Butter Buds.

Typically, if a food already has considerable fat content, you wouldn’t want to add more fat to give it a buttery flavor. Or it may have a flavor-bearing alternative, such as yogurt. Butter powder, then, contains the dry flavors that make butter butter, and not just fat. These include whey and other milk proteins, malto-dextrin and salt.


22 posted on 02/28/2014 12:03:26 PM PST by dangus
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To: djf

Where is it? Next to the Instant Beer?


23 posted on 02/28/2014 12:04:54 PM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: steve86

No, you do NOT “rehydrate” butter!

The main liquid in butter is oil, not water!


24 posted on 02/28/2014 12:04:58 PM PST by dangus
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To: areukiddingme1

“I know a guy who invented powdered water — But he doesn’t know what to add”

Bourbon DUH!


25 posted on 02/28/2014 12:06:46 PM PST by IMR 4350
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To: djf

Not unlike using buttermilk solids (powdered). It does require some water to reconstitute. When you have no refrig and you are eating out of your survivalist food supply it would come in handy


26 posted on 02/28/2014 12:07:30 PM PST by Nifster
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To: mabarker1

I use buttermilk powder often while baking..


27 posted on 02/28/2014 12:10:04 PM PST by ken5050 (I fear a world run by adults who were never spanked as kids and got trophies just for participating)
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To: lysie; JRandomFreeper

28 posted on 02/28/2014 12:10:24 PM PST by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: djf

We were so poor growing up my mother had powdered milk in her brestisis


29 posted on 02/28/2014 12:11:40 PM PST by al baby (Hi MomÂ… I was refereeing to Obama)
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To: Kartographer

Looks good. Thank you.


30 posted on 02/28/2014 12:12:09 PM PST by lysie
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To: Kartographer

31 posted on 02/28/2014 12:12:14 PM PST by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: appalachian_dweller; OldPossum; DuncanWaring; VirginiaMom; CodeToad; goosie; kalee; ...

Preppers’ PING!!


32 posted on 02/28/2014 12:15:11 PM PST by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: djf

bleah < |:P~

33 posted on 02/28/2014 12:20:20 PM PST by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: 1rudeboy
You use it to make your powdered eggs, silly.

Powdered eggs suck so bad they should be outlawed.

5.56mm

34 posted on 02/28/2014 12:23:49 PM PST by M Kehoe
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To: ken5050

Yep, got a can in stock:

Biscuits, Pancakes, Waffles, etc.

and it don’t go bad like a carton will.

I’m gonna get some of this butter to put in the stash since Mama won’t let Me get a cow or goat because She thinks I’ll eat them. (and She’s right if they don’t produce or times get tough) same for the pet pig I want.


35 posted on 02/28/2014 12:24:14 PM PST by mabarker1 (Please, Somebody Impeach the kenyan!!!!)
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To: djf

How does this stack up against Clarified Butter?


36 posted on 02/28/2014 12:29:15 PM PST by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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To: djf

I’ve never tried any but have read some people don’t like powdered butter. I’ve also seen that buying a “Butter Buds” type product in bulk (myspicer.com) is cheaper than store bought. Adding coconut oil (ratio unknown) to the powdered buds makes a tasty spreadable product.


37 posted on 02/28/2014 12:55:50 PM PST by bgill
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To: djf

I must say I am repulsed by the thought of powdered butter...just sucking the moisture, vitamins, and other relevant substances out of something, and then ‘adding water’ later leaves me thinking, how tasteless.

I understand dried fruit and other preserving methods, for long term storage. The taste is somehow never the same though.

Actually, I can’t help you, just ranting about man made foods that have no real taste. I would miss the real stuff during a crisis. I believe in emergency supplies too.
Hope you figure out how to make it butter again.


38 posted on 02/28/2014 12:59:18 PM PST by Kackikat
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To: djf

Didn’t know you could do that.

Maybe its a butter substitute of some sort?


39 posted on 02/28/2014 1:06:51 PM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: djf

It’s basically butter flavored powdered milk.


40 posted on 02/28/2014 1:10:44 PM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: djf; Kartographer; JRandomFreeper; greeneyes; All
I read the posts through number 38 to see what people said about powdered butter.

I dealt with this subject years ago in my preps. I prepared for no power, therefore no fridge. Powdered butter is too expensive and it isn't solid like butter, so I didn't store any. For baked goods, I would use, which I have stored, Butter Flavored Crisco, to substitute for butter. Why spend gobs of money for powder when you can use butter Crisco and get the same results? Don't want to dig out a can but I recall the substitution instructions are on the Butter Flavored Crisco can.

To put on food to eat right then, I stored bottles of Molly McButter sprinkles. It has an intense butter flavor and you will definitely taste butter on your potatoes or whatever you put it on. I haven't tried sprinkling it on toast but it that didn't work well, I'd use a flavored syrup on toast and eat it with a fork.

So, my opinion is, which I did - is, the cheapest method with reliable results is, Butter Flavored Crisco and Molly McButter sprinkles.

41 posted on 02/28/2014 1:19:54 PM PST by Marcella ((Prepping can save your life today. I am a Christian, not a Muslim.))
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To: djf

Butter powder was originally developed for the processed foods industry. When used in baking, butter powder really shines. As it is mostly butter, the flavor really comes through in your baked goods. Butter powder is extremely handy in mixes. Being in a powdered form, it blends easily with the other dry ingredients in a mix. Then, weeks or months later when it’s reconstituted, the batter acts just as if you’d added butter. And of course, the end result is a dish or baked good that has a great flavor. You can use butter powder in many of the same dishes where you’d use regular butter. Add butter powder to your cooked vegetables, macaroni and cheese, instant rice or in any cooked dish calling for butter.

Our butter powder is a fine, free flowing powder. By looking at it you’d never guess it’s #1 ingredient is butter. Many people say, “I didn’t think you could dehydrate fat.” And they’re right. You can’t dehydrate fat as dehydrate literally means to ‘remove the water’ and fat has none. The small amount of water in butter is removed, however. Then, the powder is made by cleverly processing milk solids with the butter. Reconstituted butter powder looks much like whipped butter and tastes like butter with an added milky flavor to it. Because it does have a milky taste, some people find it takes just a bit of getting used to as a spread on bread. However, the mouth ‘feel’ is the same as butter and it looks and spreads much like butter after it has been reconstituted. It will even melt into hot toast and pancakes almost as fast as regular butter.

Butter powder’s big advantage over regular butter is it’s non-perishable qualities. Butter powder also has an antioxidant added to help keep it fresh. The antioxidants coupled with USA Emergency Supplies’ packaging technology gives you a product that remains fresh and wholesome for years after purchasing it.

The above is from https://www.usaemergencysupply.com/information_center/butter_powder.htm


42 posted on 02/28/2014 1:24:32 PM PST by GGpaX4DumpedTea (I am a Tea Party descendant...steeped in the Constitutional Republic given to us by the Founders)
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To: djf

43 posted on 02/28/2014 1:34:08 PM PST by Organic Panic
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To: Starstruck

It’s almost the opposite.
Clarified butter is all butterfat with the milk solids and some of the moisture removed.
Powdered butter is no fat with added milk solids.


44 posted on 02/28/2014 1:36:27 PM PST by Nonsense Unlimited
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To: Kartographer

That cheese is good...I’ve had it before.


45 posted on 02/28/2014 1:43:19 PM PST by moovova
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To: Starstruck

“How does this stack up against Clarified Butter?”

Clarified butter is horrible on powdered lobster.


46 posted on 02/28/2014 1:49:33 PM PST by moovova
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To: 1rudeboy

You use it to make your powdered eggs, silly.
= = = = = = = = = = =
We ‘lived’ off powdered eggs and powdered milk while aboard ship.

Chocolate syrup (if availbable) ‘helped’ the milk and LOTS and LOTS of salt and pepper made the eggs edible.

On Sundays, they would make us ‘Powdered Eggs to Order’.
They all looked scrambled (some kind of yellowish mass) but if you wanted ‘Sunnyside Up’ you just told the ‘Chef’ and when you got to the proper recepticle they were there. Right in there with the ‘Poached’, ‘Over Easy’,’Soft Boiled’, ‘Hard Boiled’, ‘Hard Scrambled’ etc etc.

We did get ‘fresh’ milk on occasion but I don’t really remember REAL eggs once underway, would imagine enough rolls of the ship and they would break anyway.

Oh yes, the bread almost always had some kind of ‘creature’ in it and we were advised it was extra protein and if something crunchy were to be found in the powdered eggs, it was claimed it must have been an egg shell.....


47 posted on 02/28/2014 2:05:04 PM PST by xrmusn (6/98 --When you have them by the short hairs, the minds and hearts soon follow.)
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To: TexasGator

I remember reading in a story to mix the powder with coconut oil. I only use it in bread baking.


48 posted on 02/28/2014 2:19:44 PM PST by goosie
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To: djf

Wake me up when they come up with powdered beer.


49 posted on 02/28/2014 2:36:51 PM PST by Sawdring
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To: Nonsense Unlimited
It’s almost the opposite.

Kinda talking about shelf life here. If not I will be eating the real thing.

50 posted on 02/28/2014 2:58:19 PM PST by Starstruck (If my reply offends, you probably don't understand sarcasm or criticism...or do.)
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