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Sony And Panasonic Announce The 1TB Archival Disc
Hardocp ^ | Monday March 10, 2014 | Posted by Steve 8:13 AM (CST)

Posted on 03/10/2014 8:54:35 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach

Sony Corporation and Panasonic today announced that they have formulated "Archival Disc", a new standard for professional-use, next-generation optical discs, with the objective of expanding the market for long-term digital data storage. Optical discs have excellent properties to protect themselves against the environment, such as dust-resistance and water-resistance, and can also withstand changes in temperature and humidity when stored.


(Excerpt) Read more at hardocp.com ...


TOPICS: Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: hitech

1 posted on 03/10/2014 8:54:36 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

They are just announcing this? That seems small for someone who wants a lot of movies. My computer HD is 2TB and I got that last year!


2 posted on 03/10/2014 8:56:25 AM PDT by Red in Blue PA (When Injustice becomes Law, Resistance Becomes Duty.-Thomas Jefferson)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Copying file 1 of 290,389; 926 GB total
Estimated time remaining: 209 hours, 37 minutes

3 posted on 03/10/2014 8:58:18 AM PDT by GreenAccord (Bacon Akbar)
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To: Red in Blue PA

Sorry, misread that. Missed optical discs.

Not sure I would trust them over time however, as they can warp, get scratched, crack fairly easily etc.

For archiving important docs, I buy 64GB flash drives and put them in baggies in a safe to keep the moisture out. And because they are relatively inexpensive, one can do this multiple times so if there is one failure, you have another copy.


4 posted on 03/10/2014 8:58:24 AM PDT by Red in Blue PA (When Injustice becomes Law, Resistance Becomes Duty.-Thomas Jefferson)
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To: ShadowAce; SunkenCiv; Las Vegas Dave

fyi


5 posted on 03/10/2014 8:58:56 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; Salo; JosephW; Only1choice____Freedom; amigatec; Still Thinking; ...

6 posted on 03/10/2014 8:59:49 AM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: GreenAccord

I’m still working on printing the internet.

/johnny


7 posted on 03/10/2014 9:05:00 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Red in Blue PA

Store your flash drive in an anti-static bag and place it in a fireproof safe.


8 posted on 03/10/2014 9:07:40 AM PDT by miliantnutcase
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To: JRandomFreeper

You should have used FIT TO 1 PAGE. BTW, Tray 1 is empty again.


9 posted on 03/10/2014 9:08:54 AM PDT by GreenAccord (Bacon Akbar)
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To: Red in Blue PA
For archiving important docs, I buy 64GB flash drives and put them in baggies in a safe to keep the moisture out. And because they are relatively inexpensive, one can do this multiple times so if there is one failure, you have another copy.

You do understand that when you program flash, you're essentially charging a capacitor, right? And that, like all capacitors, the charge in flash leaks off?

Last time I looked into it, flash was only rated to hold its charge for about 10 years.

10 posted on 03/10/2014 9:13:49 AM PDT by Vroomfondel
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To: Red in Blue PA

Flash drives, especially with USB3 are also MUCH faster.

Optical media is all but obsolete, IMO.


11 posted on 03/10/2014 9:15:27 AM PDT by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: Red in Blue PA; GreenAccord
There is also the M-Disc from the Provo Utah co, ,....but it is smaller capacity.

Requires a stronger laser burner to affect the metal in the disc.

Capacity is at DVD level.

12 posted on 03/10/2014 9:15:52 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
I'm skeptical that a new format like this can get enough market share to overcome worries that it will quickly become obsolete.

The soundest archiving strategy is to make multiple copies of everything and copy them onto the new generation of media as the old one starts to fade out.

13 posted on 03/10/2014 9:19:25 AM PDT by Aqua Buddhist
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To: Vroomfondel
"Last time I looked into it, flash was only rated to hold its charge for about 10 years."

In 10 years, you would probably have a difficult time finding a device that's physically compatible with anything we are using to store data on today.(if history is any indicator) Of course, USB and CD type drives have stuck with us for a long time now, so I could be wrong. You'd probably be challenged to now find a new machine with IDE connections.

14 posted on 03/10/2014 9:19:57 AM PDT by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

I just use Crashplan for offsite backup.


15 posted on 03/10/2014 9:22:23 AM PDT by for-q-clinton (If at first you don't succeed keep on sucking until you do succeed)
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To: All
Link:

ENGRAVE TODAY, STORE FOR A LIFETIME

WHY YOU NEED TO USE THE LG M-READY DRIVE

16 posted on 03/10/2014 9:24:29 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
I have a commercial music CD that I bought in ‘87 (Tijuana Brass,IIRC) that still plays perfectly.I have data and music CD-Rs that are 15 years old that have preserved their data perfectly.Pretty amazing,IMO.
17 posted on 03/10/2014 9:24:32 AM PDT by Gay State Conservative (Stalin Blamed The Kulaks,Obama Blames The Tea Party)
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To: All
Another link:

This is a Press Release edited by StorageNewsletter.com on 2013.01.10<)> AddThis Social Bookmark Button U.S.-based Millenniata, Inc. will offer Blu-ray M-DISCs in the second quarter of 2013, increasing both the storage capacity and the accessibility of the M-DISC.

The announcement, made at the Storage Visions Conference in Las Vegas, NE marks a step forward in permanent data storage solutions for businesses and consumers by making the M-DISC available in all the standard optical disc formats.

The other advance in the growing worldwide acceptance of the M-DISC DVD and the forthcoming Blu-ray M-DISC is the marketing and distribution partnership with Imation Corp. announced at the Storage Visions Conference. Millenniata and Imation have agreed to co-brand and distribute both the M-DISC and Blu-ray M-DISC under Imation's TDK, Memorex and Imation brands.

Ritek Corporation, manufacturer of optical storage media, will produce the new Blu-ray M-DISC as part of its manufacturing agreement with Millenniata. In addition, Ritek has signed a license agreement with Millenniata to distribute and co-brand both the DVD and Blu-ray M-DISCs through its established distribution and reseller channel as a secondary distribution channel for the M-DISC products behind Imation.

The new Blu-ray M-DISCs will be writable and readable on any Blu-ray combo drive - a step for Millenniata and the convenience of this permanent storage technology. The Blu-ray M-DISCs will also offer at least five times the amount of storage as the standard 4.7GB M-DISC.

"This is very exciting news for us and the entire permanent data storage industry," said Paul Brockbank, Millenniata president and CEO. "The new Blu-ray M-DISCs will not only open the doors to more storage space, but also allow users to employ our optical discs with virtually any Blu-ray drive."

Millenniata produces the M-DISC, which provides data loss prevention by laser etching data (files, photos, videos, etc.) into an inorganic rock-like material that is not available from any other recordable media.

A recent study performed by the U.S. Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake, CA tested five brands of archival-quality DVD discs, including the Millenniata M-DISC for data longevity and reliability. The test found that M-DISC was the only solution that suffered no degradation or data loss under the harsh testing environments. All other discs tested failed.

Currently, only M-DISC compatible drives can write to the DVD version of M-DISC, but it can be read in any DVD drive. Millenniata partner LG Electronics offers an affordable M-Ready optical drive for customers who want the peace of mind of having their important information stored forever.

Additionally, Acer, Inc. is now offering a permanent storage solution to its global customers with the integration of M-DISC compatible Hitachi LG Data Storage (HLDS) DVD and Blu-ray optical drives in Acer computers.

The M-DISC Ready drives are available on the recently launched M series of notebooks under Acer's Aspire range. Hitachi-LG Data Storage, Inc. (HLDS) manufactures the M-DISC compatible drives in partnership with Millenniata.

With all the daily news on the WW storage industry, this website is updated every day at 9AM in Chicago or 4PM in Paris. You can subscribe to receive an email with the daily headlines. Stay informed ! Subscribe to our free newsletter...

18 posted on 03/10/2014 9:35:54 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Gay State Conservative
The M-Disk will go well beyond 15 years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/M-DISC

19 posted on 03/10/2014 9:41:25 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

Bookmark


20 posted on 03/10/2014 9:52:35 AM PDT by publius911 ( At least Nixon had the good g race to resign!)
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To: publius911
I think the M- disc is the best for real long term storage.

See my updates.

Looks like a competitive market is occurring.

21 posted on 03/10/2014 10:05:17 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach
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To: Aqua Buddhist

I’m doing that using hard drives.

It would be really nice to have a simpler solution.


22 posted on 03/10/2014 10:19:18 AM PDT by dangerdoc (I don't think you should be forced to make the same decision I did even if I know I'm right.)
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To: Red in Blue PA

while your statement about your computer’s hard drive is true, so too is one of the lead in comments:

“Optical discs have excellent properties to protect themselves against the environment, such as dust-resistance and water-resistance, and can also withstand changes in temperature and humidity when stored.”

between computer hard drives and optical disks, the term “excellent” in the statement above can be translated as “superior”, which is why digital archivists will be interested in the development


23 posted on 03/10/2014 10:30:46 AM PDT by Wuli
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To: KoRn
Optical media is all but obsolete, IMO.

It's obsolete for short-term read/write, but it's superior in almost every way except for sealed spinning disk. For backups, writing critical data to optical disk and securing it in a fire safe or a temperature-controlled warehouse is about the best you can get for private, retrievable storage.

I've personally started writing encrypted backups to the Amazon cloud (Glacier), and it's insanely convenient; however, if they ever crack 2048-bit RSA encryption, my backups are as good as hacked. The BD-RWs I have in my fire safe, however, are not going anywhere and will survive the harshest fires.

Optical is definitely falling out of use, but it still has its place.

24 posted on 03/10/2014 11:14:53 AM PDT by rarestia (It's time to water the Tree of Liberty.)
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To: Red in Blue PA

If you really want to keep them dry, I suggest a desiccant material be put in the baggie also. Mainly an issue if you lose electrical power.

Isn’t excessive dryness potentially damaging? Static electricity or some such?


25 posted on 03/10/2014 11:18:03 AM PDT by Sherman Logan
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To: KoRn

USB has been around long enough that even if it gets replaced there will be readily available adapter units (plug one end into the new type of port, plug a USB cord into the other). At that point, it’ll be time to copy all important files onto the new standard media.


26 posted on 03/10/2014 11:19:06 AM PDT by Aqua Buddhist
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To: Gay State Conservative
I still have the very first CD I ever purchased. (DSOTM) Yes, it still plays. There is a big difference between music and data though, because CD players were designed to recover gracefully from errors. If you miss a few bits of a song, you won't notice while listening, but if you drop bits from your files, the result can be quickly catastrophic. I must say though, that I'm extremely happy with how long my music CDs have lasted. cdparanoia can actually report how successful it is in ripping the data off a CD.
27 posted on 03/10/2014 12:41:06 PM PDT by zeugma (Is it evil of me to teach my bird to say "here kitty, kitty"?)
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To: GreenAccord
Estimated time remaining: 209 hours, 37 minutes

Aye...therein lies the rub.

28 posted on 03/11/2014 6:17:56 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (Truth sounds like hate...to those who hate truth.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

And I used to think I was the cat’s meow when I installed my 120Mb 3.5” Super Disk drive...10 years ago.


29 posted on 03/11/2014 6:19:53 AM PDT by Bloody Sam Roberts (Truth sounds like hate...to those who hate truth.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

30 posted on 03/11/2014 6:29:00 AM PDT by Daffynition ("If you think you can do a thing or think you can't do a thing, you're right." ~ Henry Ford)
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